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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

I'm hoping that you can help with a problem I've encountered after removing wallpaper in my bathroom. The wallpaper was strippable and came off pretty easy other than a few hard spots, but after taking it off, I'm left with a lot of different textures on the wall that I'm not sure what to do about before painting. There are areas of clean drywall without primer and some with primer, but the problem textures come from a previous wallpaper that was not removed correctly:

1) There are several large areas all over the walls where the top layer of drywall was ripped off and filled in with joint compound (I think) to make it smoother. There are also other areas that I think were old wallpaper/glue that could not be removed, so they covered them with joint compound too.

2) Other areas where the top layer of drywall ripped a little bit but not enough to cover with joint compound. Instead, it seems like there's only primer covering these areas, so the texture is quite rough.

3) Other parts where the primer flaked off in bits when I removed the wallpaper.

So in the end, I have areas of smooth drywall, areas of smooth-ish joint compound, areas of flaked-off primer, and areas of rough/ripped drywall covered with primer. It seems to me that if I put a coat of primer and paint the wall as is, all of these different textures will show through the paint. What can I do to make the paint job look even/smooth?

Can I just sand all the rough parts as much as possible and then put a coat or two of primer on before painting? Would a high build primer hide the imperfections on the wall? Or, do I need to smooth out the entire wall with joint compound to give it all the same texture, and then put primer over it? (This seems like it would be very time consuming.)

Also, I can't see any glue on the wall after removing the wallpaper, but if I wipe with a wet rag, I can feel stickiness on the wall--I imagine this is leftover glue. Do I need to wipe that off until it's not sticky at all anymore? Would sanding instead get rid of the glue?

I'd really appreciate any help/suggestions. Thanks in advance!

Newkirk
 

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Buy a can of Gardz primer. Sand the wall to remove high spots and rough spots. Apply the Gardz to all those torn areas of drywall and those sticky spots. This will seal up the damage so you can apply a skim coat. You may have to apply 2 coats of joint compound. Sand smooth, vac up the dust, prime the jc with drywall primer and repaint.

Lots of useful info (including video) in this recent thread:
http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/skim-coat-textured-walls-385506/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, Gymschu, and thanks for the link to the other post/video--very helpful! I checked at Home Depot/Lowe's in my area and they don't have Gardz, but they do have Roman RX-35, which seems to be similar. Would this do the job as well?

Is the point of the Gardz simply to cover up the glue/sticky spots? The wall actually doesn't feel sticky at all when dry, only if I apply a wet rag to it. What would happen if I used a regular primer/sealer instead before the skim coat? The previous person had already primed most of the wall, including the damaged rough areas (and only a very little bit of that primer came off when I took off the wallpaper)--so I would pretty much be putting the Gardz on top of primer or joint compound that's already there.

Thanks again for your help!

Newkirk
 

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paper hanger and painter
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Thank you, Gymschu, and thanks for the link to the other post/video--very helpful! I checked at Home Depot/Lowe's in my area and they don't have Gardz, but they do have Roman RX-35, which seems to be similar. Would this do the job as well?

Is the point of the Gardz simply to cover up the glue/sticky spots? The wall actually doesn't feel sticky at all when dry, only if I apply a wet rag to it. What would happen if I used a regular primer/sealer instead before the skim coat? The previous person had already primed most of the wall, including the damaged rough areas (and only a very little bit of that primer came off when I took off the wallpaper)--so I would pretty much be putting the Gardz on top of primer or joint compound that's already there.

Thanks again for your help!

Newkirk
Rx-35 is no where near as good as Gardz. If your walls fell tacky after the wet rag thing, then you have not removed it all and is the reason for the Gardz, to seal it up. if you apply regular water based primer it will not seal the paste and you will have one awful mess on your hands, trust us. You can get Gardz from amazon if need be. If you have a PPG store near by, they might have it or will get it for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks! Ordered Gardz from Amazon and it should be here tomorrow. I know what you mean about the glue now. There was some mold behind the wallpaper above the tub, and when I sprayed some moldicide on the walls there was all this thick glue that for some reason wasn't as thick in other parts that I had tested before. So thank you for the suggestion of using Gardz--seems essential! Should I try and get rid of the glue where it's thicker, or I'm I okay just putting the Gardz over it? It would be nice to not worry about removing any glue. Thanks!

Newkirk
 
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