DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Maybe you all saw my previous post, but I figured I should start a new one for this specific topic.

What I've heard so far from contractors:

1. reglue, with contact cement (one said this was no good, it will fall off again)

2. Use metal strips? Mentioned a "kit" - sounds bogus that there's an actual kit for this.

3. Use sheet metal screws and large washers in combination with glue?

4. My idea . . . 2 part 5 min. epoxy.. . . I glue lots of stuff with that and it's good stuff. Holds up even under water in my pool. And then 4 screws w/ large washers, to be extra sure.

5. I didn't get a chance to see exactly where it came from, but it's square (31" x 31") and removing the top of the unit gives access. Will I be able to see where it goes? I also have the installation manual, though I'm not sure it shows where the insulation is.

6. I know to disconnect the power to the unit.

Might be easier to just do it myself.
 

·
Household Handyman
Joined
·
2,480 Posts
It sounds as if you are talking about the insulation being on the inside of the ductwork, which is unusual in this area except for industrial applications. Insulation on the inside of sheet metal ductwork in industrial applications that I have worked on are held in place by a unique fastener. This fastener looks like a long nail made to a flat metal plate approximately two inches (2") square and on the back of the square part there is a peel-off paper which reveals a very sticky glue. You just slap this nail onto the inside of the ductwork, then push the compacted fiberglass onto the nail, then bend the end of the nail over slightly. I've seen thousands of these used and they hold very well. Where to get them? I'd start by going, not calling, a local HVAC supply house, tell them your situation, ask about the fasteners and see if they have them and will sell you some. Someone will probably chime in here with the name of these and more info now. Good Luck, David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That sounds like the stuff

It sounds as if you are talking about the insulation being on the inside of the ductwork, which is unusual in this area except for industrial applications. Insulation on the inside of sheet metal ductwork in industrial applications that I have worked on are held in place by a unique fastener. This fastener looks like a long nail made to a flat metal plate approximately two inches (2") square and on the back of the square part there is a peel-off paper which reveals a very sticky glue. You just slap this nail onto the inside of the ductwork, then push the compacted fiberglass onto the nail, then bend the end of the nail over slightly. I've seen thousands of these used and they hold very well. Where to get them? I'd start by going, not calling, a local HVAC supply house, tell them your situation, ask about the fasteners and see if they have them and will sell you some. Someone will probably chime in here with the name of these and more info now. Good Luck, David
That's it I think! It's 31 X 31" fiberglass on one side, aluminum shiny on the other, then there are two pieces of square metal (approx. 2" sq.) "tabs" with nails though them and the nails are bent slightly. So I have the piece of insulation intact. I was told this was quite common for them to come off. But the nail, metal tab, and insulation are all there. The nail must have let loose, they weren't bent to 90 degrees, just slightly bent. Glue is on the fiberglass side , not the shiny side. I may go up today and see if I can see where it goes (first I want to make sure I have some washers and sheet metall screws to reinforce it. I'll let you all know.
 

·
Hvac Pro
Joined
·
23,362 Posts
Duro dyne makes them:http://www.durodynecanada.ca/canada/products/insul_fasteners/sah.htm

See if a hvac sheet metal shop may sell you some. There is a metal tab which slides on the nail and locks the insulation in place. They are prone to falling off. If you perforate the duct with sheet metals screws you may have rust or a water leak unless you coat it with silicone where it is exposed to the rain/elements.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top