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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll start off by stating I live in Central Texas - so that you can think about what type of weather we have here: We have about 19 sub-freezing day in the winter; about 90-100 days, low 90s to low 100s in the summer, and an average of 79 rain days a year with an average about 13 inches of rain each year, with May and June having 5 and 4 inches, respectively.

I had racoons get into my attic and they made their way to the space between the 1st and 2nd floor by climbing down the shaft for the AC flex duct running from the 2nd story to the 1st.

The space is about 16 inches (top to bottom), created by the pre-manufactured trusses they used to create the ceiling of the 1st story (level) and the floor of the 2nd story (level). I haven't for the life of me been able to find what this space is called.

In this space they damaged alot of AC duct, electrical cabling jackets and, from I can tell, they were trying to find a way out and knocked down or tore up almost all the insulation in the exterior walls AND (this is related directly to my question) the asphalt paper that was used to wrap the house.

I had to have the sheetrock ceiling for the 1st story removed to get to this area to fix the electric. With the sheetrock down it makes it easier to replace the AC flexduct.

I need to make sure that the asphalt paper in the exterior wall is fixed the right way. I had 3 contractors come by and each gave me a different method (and price) to fix the damage to the asphalt paper. Since none of them (separately, without me telling them what the other said) were in agreement on how it should be fixed, I did my own research, but cannot find much on this - other than to fix it 'the right way' 'from the outside'. But tearing down the exterior brick walls (3 sides) and fiber-cement siding (back side) to replace the asphalt paper (approximate 16 inches tall x 22 inches wide) (spaces between the trusses) seems very excessive to me, not to mention it would be very costly.

As already stated, I live in Central Texas, and not sure why asphalt paper is used in homes here, is it for the rain, or the wind, or both? If it's just for the wind, seems like cutting squares to put in the spaces, secure it with staples and then insulate behind it will do the trick. If it is for rain, then that solution will not work.

Anyone have a similar experience, or advice to share? And how was it fixed?

One photo attached, with some damage to asphalt paper, but in almost all the other areas, the asphalt paper was torn off from stud to stud (side to side, top to bottom).

Thank you in advance for your review and replies.
 

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You need damproofing material in the air space between the back of the brick and wall sheathing. Moisture hits this, collects and travels down to the bottom and out weep holes. Tar paper is commonly used.

What is that greyish material the other side of the paper? I don't know why the paper would be inside, unless there is no sheathing. But you said to staple new paper, what would you be stapling it to?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good question: That picture is actually the back side of the house, so what you see is the fiber-cement board, no sheathing. The other, brick, sides also have a gray material that is more of a cardboard - perhaps that is the sheating. So on the brick sides it appears (going from outside to the inside) that it is: Brick, gray cardboard material (sheathing), asphalt paper nailed to the framing (which the racoons tore up) then insulation. On the back side: fiber-cement board, asphalt paper (seen in picture) nailed to framing, insulation.

The stapling would be to the 2x6 truss (seen in the picture) on the left and right sides and to the 2x4 (seen at the top) also one at the bottom that can't be seen behind the insulation.
 

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Brick is not waterproof. So, yeah, a little rain will get in there and run down to the weep holes. I'd probably try to somehow slip paper in front of the paper on the bottom and behind the paper on top. Kind of like shingles on the roof. Maybe some vertical beads of caulk to seal up the edges while still letting the water flow down. Maybe I'd spray a ton of water on there with a garden hose to test things out before and after. There's no right or wrong answer on this one. You're in uncharted territory. You just need something that works.
 

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Good question: That picture is actually the back side of the house, so what you see is the fiber-cement board, no sheathing. The other, brick, sides also have a gray material that is more of a cardboard - perhaps that is the sheating. So on the brick sides it appears (going from outside to the inside) that it is: Brick, gray cardboard material (sheathing), asphalt paper nailed to the framing (which the racoons tore up) then insulation. On the back side: fiber-cement board, asphalt paper (seen in picture) nailed to framing, insulation.

The stapling would be to the 2x6 truss (seen in the picture) on the left and right sides and to the 2x4 (seen at the top) also one at the bottom that can't be seen behind the insulation.
Remove that insulation and show us the bottom of the damage.

Usually you can just patch it up in shingle style that directs water to the outside and just tape it in place from the inside with red Tuck tape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you mathmonger. Slipping the paper in was my first thought, but it is a tight fit as the carboard material (sheathing?) and fiber cement boards are also nailed to the framing and it is a 'very tight' fit and I couldn't slide new asphalt paper in-between. I tried doing it as you stated - under at the top, and over at the bottom. I figured I was in a unique situation when I couldn't find anything similar to this on the internet - been researching for a while now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for your reply Nealtw. I'll have to run out and get more pictures. This damage is to a second home we bought for our daughter to use (after a divorce). It's about 10 miles down the road so I need to go get those pictures to show the bottom.
 

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I would use a Liquid applied waterproofing & make sure that the new coating seals all edges of the existing asphalt paper.
Example of material that could be used Durock Liquid waterproofing , SOT Emerald Coat or STO Gold Coat.
 

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Felt is basically your drainage plane and I think you've caught on that stapling to the wood around each joist space like an air barrier is not the way to do it. Try as best you can to cut a flap at the bottom of what remains to slide the new over for an overlap. You won't have side overlaps but better than nothing.

But FYI on the brick side if they have used a gypsum board that has the seams taped and sealed, the felt on the inside of this is just additional protection, and not critical.

On the back if the fiber cement is the siding, then the felt allowing moisture to drain is critical.
 

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I would use a Liquid applied waterproofing & make sure that the new coating seals all edges of the existing asphalt paper.
Example of material that could be used Durock Liquid waterproofing , SOT Emerald Coat or STO Gold Coat.
Wouldn't that trap water inside the wall and not let it flow down and weep out?
 

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Thank you mathmonger. Slipping the paper in was my first thought, but it is a tight fit as the carboard material (sheathing?) and fiber cement boards are also nailed to the framing and it is a 'very tight' fit and I couldn't slide new asphalt paper in-between. I tried doing it as you stated - under at the top, and over at the bottom. I figured I was in a unique situation when I couldn't find anything similar to this on the internet - been researching for a while now.
I don't know what the deal is with the cardboard. I'd want to figure that exactly what it is before I tried to fix it. You had three contractors look at it and nobody could even tell you what it is? Maybe town inspector or building department? I don't know if you have those in the middle of Texas. How about your insurance company?

Maybe you could use aluminum flashing instead of paper. That would be stiffer and maybe you would be better able to push it into that tight spot.
 

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Wouldn't that trap water inside the wall and not let it flow down and weep out?
I would think that the moisture / water would follow the edge of the existing felt attached to the studs & follow the drainage plane of the felt paper.
The OP stated that the gray area is cement board which leads me to believe that the moisture / water will also follow the cement board & travel down on to the felt paper that still exist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nealtw, I got back with pictures. I don't know how many I can post but here is the one you asked about. I'll post the others separately. I tried multiple times to change the rotation of the picture with no success. The top is on the left. I may be able to get way with the 'layering of paper on this one, but as you'll see in other photos, if I can load them, 'all' the paper is gone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Mathmonger you have given me an idea with the aluminum "flashing instead of paper". I'm going to try that, but with some rigid plastic instead - easier to cut and form. At the top I am going to leave it about 1/4 away from the fiber-cement board/sheathing. I'll put in some small nails at the top to make sure the rigid plastic piece doesn't go against the wall and so that it creates a pocket at the top. I'll tuck the plastic at the bottom and hope I get it on the outside of the paper (since I can't see it). I'll caulk the sides, top to bottom to channel any moister onto the plastic and down the wall. Then I'll add the insulation behind that. Thoughts as to why this would not work - Anyone???
 
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