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Discussion Starter #1
So, I've finally filled and sanded all of the small holes and scratches in our walls from our move. I've placed one coat of white primer with a small roller over the patches but am still able to see through the primer and see where the drywall compound was. Do I require a second coat of primer before I paint, or would I be ok to go ahead and paint over the primer now with the wall colour with a small roller?

At our former house I didn't bother with primer and went over the drywall compound with a brush. It didn't look pretty at the end, and was shadowing or flashing (if that's the correct term for it). I don't want to screw this one up.

Thanks!
 

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DIYguy, if you have a lot of patches on one wall I would re-roll the whole wall, else your wall may end up with a measles look. The likelihood that multiple touch-ups will not be apparent, even on newly painted walls, is very slim. You can try it, but be prepared to do a full repaint.
As far as your primer, as long as you got a good coat on one should be fine. I'm not concerned that you can see the patch, the primer seals but doesn't always hide a patch.
Remember, even with a perfectly professionally done patch, if the light is just right and you're using a sheen, the patch may still be visible at times. It has to do with texture variation between the existing surface and the patched surface. It's a texture flash versus an improperly sealed surface flashing, and there's very little to nothing you can do about. The lower the sheen on troubled walls is always the better route.
 

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I usually roll on one coat of finish paint over the parches before I add two coats to the wall--

If you are hoping to just touch up the patches and not paint the walls---I doubt you will be successful.-
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice. There are some areas that have a large number of patches (like the bottom of the stairs, front entrance, and I had to do some larger patches on a living room wall).

Problem is there's several walls that have the same paint colour continue around corners and such, so if I paint the entire wall that has patches on it, do I stop at the closest corner, or do I have to continue onto the next wall so you don't see a variation in paint colour between walls? I'd probably have to repaint the entire main floor (two colours throughout an open concept), and two staircases (upper staircase is open to above, and shares the same paint colour as the large open area at the top of the stairs).

Wasn't looking to do a lot of painting, but I guess I'll have to see how it looks after one coat of paint rolled over the primer.
 

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There shouldn't be any need to repaint the entire floor, corner to corner should be enough. There's enough natural tonal variation between walls of the same in color in a room due to light differences and the color itself. With two or more walls looking a good bit different at times, it's just the way light type, intensity and direction plays on color. No one would notice, that is as long as the paint is the same.
 

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Also to hide your patch sanding is very important. If you leave an edge around your patch it will be visible. Hold a bright light almost against your wall and look down it if you see humps sand a little more.
 

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So, I've finally filled and sanded all of the small holes and scratches in our walls from our move. I've placed one coat of white primer with a small roller over the patches but am still able to see through the primer and see where the drywall compound was. Do I require a second coat of primer before I paint, or would I be ok to go ahead and paint over the primer now with the wall colour with a small roller?

At our former house I didn't bother with primer and went over the drywall compound with a brush. It didn't look pretty at the end, and was shadowing or flashing (if that's the correct term for it). I don't want to screw this one up.

Thanks!

jsheridan already answered you're question but the small roller cover concerns me.
What do you mean?
 

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Hadn't caught the small roller comment until Chris flagged it. Even if you are intent on trying to blend in these patches, you want to use a regular size roller and then "feather" the paint out, from full coverage wet to dry and partial coverage, as best you can. You gain nothing with tiny tools for this. Among other things, they just don't hold enough paint.

It's probably not going to work out though. Especially if you are painting with any sheen at all.

I understand your concern about having to paint everything once you start but unless the color is badly faded or dulled compared to the new paint, nobody will follow subtle differences around corners or from wall to wall. As jsheridan suggested, just paint the entire wall with the patches and be done with this.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
How come it seems that I always end up doing more work after I visit this chatroom? :laughing:

Thanks everyone for the tips, I figured using a small roller would keep my patches to a minimum, but understand your comments related to a larger roller.

One question though, how do you feather? Do you mean apply a full coat on the area that was patched, and then roll away from the patch until the roller isn't appllying paint anymore?

I have a feeling I'll be convincing my wife that I have to do the whole wall.
 

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Touch up is a misnomer. Too many guys chalk things up as "We'll just touch it up". No. No such thing. Only in new construction with builder's grade, and very select situations outside of that. The number of times I've been able to get away with touch up is probably a one handed number. It's rarely a quality outcome. I tell all guys who work with me to get touch up out of there head, do it right the first time and be careful afterward.

The odds are stacked against you. BM has white papers on touch up. There are numerous conditions that affect the success or failure. Since color is a function of drying time, any significant variation between temp and humidity at the original coating and the touch up will affect the drying time and ultimately the color. Using two different applicators will also affect. You should always do touch up with the same applicator you used originally. I'm certain that small roller has a different nap than the original roller. How much time has elapsed between coating and touch up. Exposed paint fades with sun while the stuff in the can does not. The list can go on, but why?

If your touch up is out of the way, fine, that's one thing. But right in the eyeline of a prominent wall will not paster muster, especially if they're multiple. Like Sdsester wisely stated, get it done with. Get your paint out once and be done with it.
 

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How come it seems that I always end up doing more work after I visit this chatroom? :laughing:

Thanks everyone for the tips, I figured using a small roller would keep my patches to a minimum, but understand your comments related to a larger roller.

One question though, how do you feather? Do you mean apply a full coat on the area that was patched, and then roll away from the patch until the roller isn't appllying paint anymore?

I have a feeling I'll be convincing my wife that I have to do the whole wall.
Hey, if JoeCaption comes along, you'll be tearing out sheetrock and replacing it, count your blessings.:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks again for the advice. Should I still apply one coat of paint to the patches, let dry, then do the whole wall like oh'mike suggested? 2 coats? If we consider changing wall colour (if we're going to do the whole thing anyways), still 2 coats or any other tips?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
wow, ok... never assume that the previous owners properly sealed the cans of paint that they ever so nicely left behind for you. That was some nasty looking paint.

New question. How do you properly dispose of paint? :) I know the stores will take back the empty cans as long as they're dry, but what if the can is more than half full?

I'll bring in the colour codes to match and get the patches taken care of first, then decide on if we're going to roll the whole wall in the same colour or a different colour.
 

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like oh'mike said you can "dry" roll the patches with the wall color. then do 2 coats. i myself am to much of a whimp to do it on a fresh patch. i always prime, dry roll then 2 coats to be sure but i see guys dry roll the wall color on the patch without priming then 2 coats.
all rollers give the paint a different texture and if yours isnt exactly what was used to begin with then yes you will get a flash/ odd looking spot on the wall. i say you can try just the spot with what you got but it probably wont look right and you'll have to paint the entire wall to the next corner.
everyone on here just wants to see you do an awesome job where theres no flashes on the wall and it looks like a pro did it so going that extra mile doing the extra work will have the best results.
 

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did you give them a really good shake and stir? if so and they are still poo then yes get the codes and get new paint. hear in ontario canada we have local disposal depots where they properly dispose of paint, oil,chemicals, etc. you'll have to see what is in your local area.

mix all the old paint together to make a new awesome looking paint for your walls.
 

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New question. How do you properly dispose of paint? :) I know the stores will take back the empty cans as long as they're dry, but what if the can is more than half full?
Excellent question and this has not come up in awhile.

As the person who had to sort out hundreds of pints, quarts and gallons of stuff for a ReStore DO NOT DUMP YOUR WASTE ON THE HABITAT FOR HUMANITY LOADING DOCK UNDER COVER OF DARKNESS!!!! Doing so is just plain tacky and uncaring. However, if the paint is just excess and is useable the ReStore may take it. Call first. We had to stop taking from homeowners for awhile until we got things sorted out.

It varies from community to community but many trash hauling and recycling operations will take latex, etc. cans if the remaining paint in them is dried out. You can speed this with cat litter---or they sell additives. When I lived in the twin cities of Chimpanzee-Banana, Champaign wouldn't take cans but Urbana would. So you have to ask. I think some people cheated and put out oil based paints and the guys are not going to stop to read labels as they pick up trash and recycling at 3 in the morning. Frankly, many do not read English anyhow.

Solvent based paints can fall into the category of household toxic wastes. Most places I have lived had annual recycling events where you could drop them off along with garden and other chemicals for safe handling and disposal. Off topic but look for events to safely get rid of electronics and their heavy metal components, flourescent bulbs, mercury thermometers/switches, etc.

Your local library is usually a good source of recycling and hazardous waste disposal information. Your State EPA may have guidelines too.

It is nice to save a few clean cans in good condition for straining paint or decanting gallons down to touch-up quarts, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks again for the tips. As for stirring what I have, I wouldn't even consider it. It reminded me of that 2 month old pot of kraft dinner I found under my roommates bed in university.

I'm just outside of Ottawa, Ontario in a smaller municipality, and the local household hazardous waste depot closes down over the winter. I know local paint stores will take the cans back as long as they're empty and dry, but for these cans I'll probably just store them until the Spring and take them to the HHW depot.
 
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