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I need to paint a fireplace. I looked it up and the site I saw recommended that I use masonry primer because there might be moisture issues otherwise, then paint the fireplace with exterior paint. I went to Lowe's and they didn't carry masonry primer, but told me to buy bonding primer then paint with interior paint. Anyhow, I don't want to have moisture problems and the guys at the hardware store don't seem to know what I'm talking about but then I asked the guy that installed our insert and he said that he's seen moisture problems without masonry paint but didn't really know what I should use but said I should seal the outside of the chimney with some sort of clear coat later when I have the time. Any suggestions? It's a stone fireplace that's already been painted with possibly one cote of masonry primer, but would likely need another primer at this point. Thanks
 

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WHOA! Back the truck up and post pics.
Or explain why you want to paint stone?
Is your choice, I cant imagine painted stone looking better then natural stone.
If you want to change the look, I do not think paint is the correct answer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's already got a primer or something on it when we got the house unfortunately. How to please. :)
 

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You don't really gain much putting on layers of primer but since you do not know what was used and is on their now? I would apply a superbonding waterbased primer coat over whatever is there in preparation for your finish coats. Then apply two coats of finish. Use interior finish unless this is some sort of exterior fireplace? You gain nothing using exterior products indoors.

You cannot apply masonry primer at this point and expect it to seep down through what is there and bond to the stone.

You will want to use fat nap roller covers---like 1-1.5" thick to roll on the primer and finish and have a quality brush handy to chase the roller work and cover the mortar joints.

I would go to a real paint store for coherent advice!

A shame someone made the decision to paint stone work. Your other option is to try and blast or otherwise remove the primer on their off but this seldom works out well.
 

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paper hanger and painter
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You don't really gain much putting on layers of primer but since you do not know what was used and is on their now? I would apply a superbonding waterbased primer coat over whatever is there in preparation for your finish coats. Then apply two coats of finish. Use interior finish unless this is some sort of exterior fireplace? You gain nothing using exterior products indoors.

You cannot apply masonry primer at this point and expect it to seep down through what is there and bond to the stone.

You will want to use fat nap roller covers---like 1-1.5" thick to roll on the primer and finish and have a quality brush handy to chase the roller work and cover the mortar joints.

I would go to a real paint store for coherent advice!

A shame someone made the decision to paint stone work:eek:. Your other option is to try and blast or otherwise remove the primer on their off but this seldom works out well.

some people are idiots
 

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I'm just not seeing this one ending up well.
 

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I still cant picture painted stone... makes me want to say :no:
Stone is great, I would be thinking of a way to seal it and keep it looking natural and shiny.
If it is already primed, I would be thinking of a way to cover it with a custom mantel.
Maybe pull down the stone .... it is already ruined beyond repair.
I dunno, pics would help, but painted stone ???
Friends do not let Friends paint stone!
 

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Some stone is ugly----I've painted 1950s sandstone fire place surrounds a couple of times---

If not painted the only other solution would have been a complete tear out ---

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder---that's why the sample books have so many colors-----
 

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Xtian, I agree with Sdsester that the use of a primer at this point, considering it's already coated, will not give you any return. Most all paints will allow a certain amount of water vapor to transfer through, breathe, without damaging the finish. But, they will all fail when the vapor content exceeds their capacity to handle. Whether or not you need to be concerned at this point is the history of the existing finish, whatever it is. Do you see any incidence of finish failure on the current finish? If there is none, you really don't need to be concerned with sealing the outside stone. If there's no damage currently, moisture shouldn't be a concern for you in the future.
As to using an exterior finish, why? Exterior finishes are better prepared to resist weather on the topside, not prevent moisture issues from behind, and will be as good as interior on that point.
In my opinion, yes, painted stone is not the most ideal scheme. But, there are degrees. I think the higher the sheen the more hideous it looks, as putting light reflective finish on it is comparable to shining a light on it and saying Look, look over here. Use the flattest finish you can appreciate and you'll be the happier for it. It doesn't matter or break any rules if your trim is painted a gloss, even the mantle over the stone. A stone surround is not trim. As to color, maybe consider black or gray.
 

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Painting stone would not be my choice, neither would painting solid cherry cabnets, but I have done both. The cabnets probably cost 20 grand, they are now painted white:eek:
i totally agree. from beautifull to butt ugly in one coat of paint. i HATE white kitchens :barf:
 

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I agree with what others have said here. Painting stone (or brick) would be my last choice.
That said, if it is a done deal and you can't strip it down to the original stone, you might do some research on faux painting techniques.
By using multiple partial layers of similar colors you may end up with something that sorta, kinda, almost looks natural. I've seen it done with brick.
 
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