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Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I am planning to lay LVP diagonally through the living area (living room/kitchen/family room). There tiled kitched is lowet than two othet rooms, theres a 3/8" setoff between kitchen - family room and 1/8" between kitchen - living room.

How can I even it out or make a slope that would be suitable for laying vinyl plank along it?

Hello. I want to lay LVP on top of my current floor, the tiled kitchen is in the middle of living room and family room, it is 3/8" lower than family room and 1/8" lower than living room. I want to lay it vertically across the area.

Here is the living area picture and the differences:

https://i.imgur.com/79NW7Eo.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/pvMWdrn.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/vGxw1NV.jpg

Heres a building plan:

https://i.imgur.com/huB3wac.jpg
 

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Glue 1/8" panelling on kitchen tiles and use commercial tile glue. You have to wait for the glue to become tacky to touch and no pickup on hand. Could take some hours depending on humidity, temps. But it will grab the panels and you don't have to weigh them down. Con is that you have to be fairly careful with laying down. You can't move the panels once in contact with glue, if you misposition them or such. As such, I may use half sheets and as much as 1/4" joints. Then patch the joints. Since kitchen, look for plastic panel or paint the panel with redguard, esp under dishwasher.

I'd use beveled threshold for family room difference.
 

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The glue is VCT, vinyl commercial tile, or I think they are also called composition tiles. Panel is not likely to stay flat so glue must grab at first try, my reasoning.

I was thinking but forgot: you need to use bigger notch trowel than recommended on the bucket. Commercial tiles need as little as 1/16, but you'd want more for paneling so the glue can grab as much of the panel, esp at the panel joints. Also, this glue does not support weight. This glue, if not set up, will take forever to cure if covered over. Don't lose patience.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for your comments.

I think I got a better idea. The "family room" was an addition to the house and it as a different subfloor, the hardwood was laid on a T&G plywood. It look like it's leveled with with the tiles. There's like 1/8 or less of a difference.

https://i.imgur.com/r2diHdx.jpg

So I am taking off the hardwood in family room.
There is just one issue, it was glued with some weird glue that is very sticky. I am considering putting a foil on top of it (it would create an water barrier too). Or sprinkle a compound on the glue, like the one in the link below.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Henry-547-25-lb-Universal-Patch-and-Skimcoat-12158/100189852

Heres a pic of the adhesive:

https://i.imgur.com/QvJZd7p.jpg

Do you think it would work?

What should I use for the tile grouts?
 

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That looks like the vct glue. VCT glue also dries to clear. Engineered flooring glue is probably about the same thing, just another name. I think any kind of powder is not a good idea. Patch powder, sand, flour. It could create mounds or humps that gets really messy to clean up. I'd just cover the glue with thick paper, such as rosin paper or tarpaper. It is less likely to tear as you work on it. Remove the flooring and just make sure the glue isn't making a hump along the subfloor. Then just cover it with a paper and tamp it down with 2x4 or something. If you feel a hump more than 1/16, I think the vinyl flooring will show it. BTW, just realizing paper idea assumes you're using locking edge flooring. You can staple over paper too but obviously can't use glue over paper.
 

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I'll add that if what you say by installing the LVP "vertically" means patterned parallel to the refrigerator wall (so when standing at the living room window you will see long continuous joints all the way through to the back family room windows):
- it will make the space look larger (longer) than if perpendicular to the ref. wall
- but you will easily see any inconsistencies, joints, "cupping", variations, etc especially with the family room windows bringing in that much light. That's why sometimes diagonal layout is chosen.
- Even if the planks are thicker, over the kitchen you could eventually see some "inset" grout joints through them if laid directly over the tile.

I don't have much to add about the differing heights, as going LVP (even tho $$) is meant to minimize work. I would remove all flooring, but then at that point I wouldn't go with LVP.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, I want to lay it that way.

That glue is a real PITA. It pulls the T&G plywood layer but does want to release the hardwood plank in few spots.

It is clear, stretchy and VERY sticky. It has some red and green particles/flakes. You can see them in picture linked below.

http://imgur.com/a/PzVxksH

I purchased the rasin paper. We'll see how it turns out. In case if it wont be flat enough. Is there anything that would dissolve that glue?
 

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Those pulled spots and the pooled clump of glue is what I was thinking about. If you paper over them, they could end up being humps. I don't know how the vinyl flooring will bridge over them. Mineral spirit should dissolve it. Go to or search for vct or engineered floor glue and see what the manual says. VCT glue I used was water clean up if still fresh. Actually try some water and see what happens. If sticky, it is possible that glue has not set up, being covered.

Only thing I can think of is to soak a newspaper or something in mineral spirits and cover a small area. After 10 minutes or so, try scraping that area with 6" joint knife or such. Room or the house will have to be ventilated really well. But I think you may be better served by covering the whole mess with at least 1/8" panelling and stapling the whole thing. 1/4" ply would be better. Then you will have to raise other areas with thicker underlayments.

Also try to see if existing underlayment, under the glue, has no low or high spots. The flooring you removed maybe was able to bridge these but vinyl flooring may not.
 
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