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I have an old house where the basement wall was made of the old rock and limestone type foundation so its not a flat surface where u can glue foam insulated board to it and then build a framed wall afterwards so was wondering how to go about building a stud wall and insulating it so i dont have to worry about mold sinse there are times i get water that comes in from the basement wall
 

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Your house doesn't sound like a candidate for a finished basement----

If water seeps through the stone --it must be open to the air to dry out---any wall will stop the air from reaching it to dry it out.

You will end up with a musty --moldy mess---Sorry--Mike---
 

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How about metal studs? Don't be intimidated they're very easy to work with. Tin snips, self tapping screws. For wallboard use a paperless product like Georgia Pacific DensArmor Plus. It's a little pricey,but this way you've done nothing to support mold growth. After all it's the cellulose in the paper on drywall that promotes mold, not the gypsum within. You will have to take this wallboard to a level 5 finish though to completely cover up the roughness of the fiberglass cladding.
http://www.drywallconstruction.com/levels_of_finish.htm
There are many mold proof insulation products available as well. For your application you might use a stone wool product like Roxul.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

With an irregular wall surface you would probably need spray foam on the inside basement wall. Have them/you insulate the rim joist area with SPF also. Then a frame wall with medium density f.g or other insulation without convective loops; http://www.diychatroom.com/f98/how-buy-choose-fiberglass-insulation-90438/

Sill sealer under the p.t. bottom plate for a capillary/thermal break: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com...ressure-treated-sill-plates-and-building-code

Air seal the drywall; http://www.buildingscience.com/docu...rs/air-barriers2014airtight-drywall-approach/

If using steel studs be aware of a compatibility issue with any p.t. wood (steel on sill sealer is fine). Steel studs form air channels in f.g. or other batt insulation, degrading it's R-value, in my earlier link. Use a careful installation, you'll be fine. Very hard to fire-stop this type of wall, check with your local B.D.

Gary
 
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