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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm trying to install an adjustable-depth 2-gang Smart Box for old work. I'm replacing a 1 gang box with this. The first time I tried installing it, after tightening the screws on the side, it pulled the box in about 1/8 or 1/4 inch on top from where I had wanted it, but the bottom stayed pretty much aligned. Then it was a nightmare trying to get the outlets looking good and aligned when the box was crooked. Now I'm starting over after filling the top old hole in the stud with wood glue and toothpicks.

What's the secret to minimize how far the Smart Box pulls in when you tighten the screws? How far does it usually pull in when you tighten the screws?

This is being installed in the middle of a wall, so I'm not able to clamp the box to a door jamb or anything, which I'm sure would help keep it in place while tightening.
 

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I usually hold the top of the box by the outside edge ( if there is a gap ) with needle nose pliers or the round outer screw barrel ( were the device screws into ) as I screw the box into the stud. I also wil pull the box a bit outside the wall to allow for any pull in as I screw the box, there by getting it flush.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tips. Tried the needle nose pliers trick, and that worked pretty well. It's still difficult to get it perfectly aligned, but that result using the pliers was much better.

Will have to try the predrilled holes next time, because I got that tip after I redid it.

I found that those Ideal electrical spacers work well to shim the electrical outlets to the case and get everything to line up. And on the Smart boxes, even if you align the stud side of the box to be flush with the drywall, then the far side seems to vary in depth a bit, since it's only connected on one side and there is more play in the far side. The spacers work well for that, too.
 

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the box can twist in or out on the unsupported side, depending if the stud it's attached to is slight twisted on way or another. I have inserted a small piece of 1x pine and use fine drywall screw to secure the pine to drywall, then box to pine via fine drywall screws and a 90 degree driver head. This keeps the far unsupported side, supported, and ends up with a flush box. On new construction I do the same thing and it gives the drywaller something to screw to for 3gang and bigger boxes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the box can twist in or out on the unsupported side, depending if the stud it's attached to is slight twisted on way or another. I have inserted a small piece of 1x pine and use fine drywall screw to secure the pine to drywall, then box to pine via fine drywall screws and a 90 degree driver head. This keeps the far unsupported side, supported, and ends up with a flush box. On new construction I do the same thing and it gives the drywaller something to screw to for 3gang and bigger boxes.
Good thinking! So you are saying you drive drywall screws through the box's plastic side into the 1x pine, correct?
 

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I do not tighten them down to where they do that. I bet if you backed the screws out a little, then the box will be like it should.
 

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Good thinking! So you are saying you drive drywall screws through the box's plastic side into the 1x pine, correct?
That is not a code compliant solution.
 
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