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So we had some water damage in our kitchen, managed to clean things up but at the time there were no issues with the floor. Well now, there are. The laminate has shrunk width wise so there is 2-3 mm spacing between pieces in some areas and they slide!

I've tried using a glue that was suggested by the builder, and it worked for a period of time but then dried out and we're back to square one.

It seems like in some places the person that installed the laminate just didn't do it correctly as some pieces can slide right under the kitchen cabinets.

How can I fix this? Should I hire someone? Should I drill holes close to where the cabinet meets the floor and nail it so it doesn't move?

My floor looks a little like a Tetris game. :vs_laugh:
 

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Laminate flooring is supposed to " float". You may try a "little" exterior glue (non-expanding) in the joints at the end to stop them from moving that much.
 

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Somethings just really wrong with that whole picture.
Did someone cut out those missing sections thinking they could be just patched back in?
It's ether a picture of the worlds worst install job for many reasons or this is a joke post.
If this is for real then I agree 100% with huesmann, there is no just fixing that one.
 

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I think i've seen something similar....in a hardwood nail-down floor.

The floor was installed up to the already set cabinets and dishwasher (which has a gap)...but the flooring guy must have run out of nails in his flooring gun and not noticed it.....consequently a few boards slid under the DW from just normal foot traffic.

Seems you have something similar in a laminate....however the laminates I know are either a TnG that gets glued together, or use a click lock system that effectively locks the planks together....maybe your's is different.

I'd try with tennis shoes kicking those planks back tight, or use a puller from the edges to tighten everything up....I would try working a good glue into the space before tightening the board up....or lightly pin nailing the few boards that are doing the slipping.

Now a floating floor should float, but your's is now pretty well acclimated to your home, and I would hope a few small pin nails would be enough to anchor the slipping boards but not enough to allow minor expansion if the floor still requires that.
 

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Not sure if we understand the situation.

Laminate is typically is pressed sawdust. It does not tolerate water at all, normally. But when it gets wet, it normally swells, not shrinks. I don't think there is any "fix" for a wet piece of laminate --- one replaces it.

So those open spaces are where wet pieces used to be ? But you say the glue fails when the laminate dries out --- are the remaining pieces the wet ones ? Are you trying to put the old damaged boards back ?
 

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To me that sure looks like click lock laminate and would be near impossible to get spaced out gaps like this under normal use.
Never ever nail down a floating floor!!
If I was made to fix this floor I'd be pulling it all out until I got to the undamaged area, inspecting for damage and mold and reinstalling it making sure it's fully locked in to place.
A few tricks I've leaned when installing this is to do a whole row at a time making 100% the ends are 100% even and locked in place with 0 gaps, two people can easyily slide the whole row in place.
The trick is to never try and just get it to lay flat in one motion, you slowly work it up and down getting closer to the floor each time to work it into the grove, once it's flat on the floor I tap over the whole area with a white rubber mallet to get rid of any tiny gaps.
 
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To me that sure looks like click lock laminate and would be near impossible to get spaced out gaps like this under normal use.
Never ever nail down a floating floor!!
If I was made to fix this floor I'd be pulling it all out until I got to the undamaged area, inspecting for damage and mold and reinstalling it making sure it's fully locked in to place.
A few tricks I've leaned when installing this is to do a whole row at a time making 100% the ends are 100% even and locked in place with 0 gaps, two people can easyily slide the whole row in place.
The trick is to never try and just get it to lay flat in one motion, you slowly work it up and down getting closer to the floor each time to work it into the grove, once it's flat on the floor I tap over the whole area with a white rubber mallet to get rid of any tiny gaps.
I agree with Joe....if that is click-lock, I can't comprehend how they are sliding out under a cabinet....but maybe it's a tng, that still should not slide apart...but maybe it is.

I also agree that you don't nail down a floater..... but if it is a few sliding....I guess I would risk light pin-nailing on one end to prevent sliding....figuring it is well acclimated to the room....still has one direction expansion...and a pin nail should allow some expansion or break if it's an issue.

Otherwise, to replace a click lock is a big pain...and usually requires a glue down replacement.
 

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2x on replacement. Or remove and reinstall, esp if you can find exact same flooring. The panels are sliding that easily because the tongue and groove parts separated. Being water damaged is part of the cause. Probably the first installation didn't lock properly. Also have heard poor quality materials from lumber liquidators. Although their t&g look like they may be forced back, they end up getting damaged, when I tried.
BTW. those materials, they never shrink with water.
 
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