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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello and thank you for this forum!

I have been working on my bathroom reno and have all but completed the baseboard, window casing, and door trim installation. But when I installed the first window casing, I was displeased with how the mitered corner turned out.

I measured the angles to make sure they were a true 90; then made a practice cut to make sure my saw was aligned properly and the 45 joint fit together perfectly. But when I put them up, I'm left with this big gap between them. I did paint the casing pieces before installation (I know some of you will have a preference for and against doing that. But I am super fussy about the paint finish; and I can do a better job on the painting when they are lying flat as opposed to already on the wall.) However, it is possible that any drips that went over the edges may be enough to push the raw edges away from each other. I don't know.

Meanwhile, I need to fill the gap and paint the seams. Any recommendations as to what I should use/how to best do that? Some people suggest against using Dex (starts out pink, turns white when it's dry) spackle because it is softer than MDF and can shrink like caulking. Oh, and I definitely do NOT want to use caulking. (I'm morally opposed to it and suck at its application anyway.) :)

I'm thinking either Dex or wood filler. Or maybe just the paint itself would be enough. If I add material (Dex or filler) then I have to deal with sanding it to the profile ~ which seems intimidating.

Anyway, I'm totally stuck and hoping for some advise. Please see pictures (hopefully I attached them properly). Cheers and hope you are all safe and sound! :smile:

Thank you kindly,
Karen
 

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Maybe it's because I'm looking at it on my phone, but your cut edges seem to have a lot of tear out. Also the piece shown seems to be short, did you allow for the reveal when you measured?

You could try James plan with the hot mud, there's nothing to lose. Or take them down and re-apply them with a smaller reveal.

I usually paint the full length of casing before cutting.
 

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retired framer
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You cut first and then painted.
Next time paint first and cut when you install

If you put a straight edge across the opening first you would see if the wall is flat or dips away from the frame or bulges out from the frame.

When you lay the board on the table of the saw you are assuming the wall is flat.

If the wall is not flat you may have to tilt the saw a little to compensate for that. Or shim the board at the table to mimic the dip in the wall.
 

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I have to hand do all my window trims one at a time because the windows are never straight for long. House settles and moves with the seasons.

I've done white silicone to fill gaps on a couple windows upstairs and I really like how well it holds up but it doesn't match the trim paint exactly and I believe you can't paint it.

I've done wood paste then painted that, and that'll work for a season or two before it shows the crack line.

Oddly the PVC trim seems to keep tight miters best. I put that on my kitchen windows cause I thought they might get splashed or steamed on and it didn't show any miter gaps until the earthquake popped the bottom corner of both windows loose. It could just be that I'd painted those black so it didn't show the gaps as much though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
To Nealtw:

I was just wondering about that......

The drywall was a good 1/4" out from the edge of the window frame. So on the back of each piece of casing is glued a matching cut 1/4" door stop, tapered edge down and out, to fill in the gap. I think it was a pretty close fit (when you look at the outside edge of the casing where it touches the wall, the gap is just a normal close seam). But yes, the angle would be off a titch. Perhaps that explains the problem. [I'll no better when I install the second window casing where there was no need for build out.]

I had contemplated tearing away the gyprock around the window to accommodate the difference; but I didn't like the cons of that option.

Meanwhile, how to fill it????
 

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And i must remember this one :: QUOTE: off a titch

reply #4 explains a whole bunch of problems i didn't have to contend with when i was framing pictures as a kid in a paint store. And i was awarded a generous supply of 1/64" putty of many colors.


Then several years later i saw something i really liked, a miter trimmer , but it was industrial hydraulic and cost more than my annual salary.
 

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Naildriver
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It looks as if the molding either tilted back toward the sheetrock or your saw cut at a slight angle on the downstroke. Nice cuts, though, and good angles.
I try to make all my joints perfect, but it just don't happen all the time. My painter is my best friend. He always tells me, don't worry, I'll make you look good.
 

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I can't tell if the gap is consistent from the outside to the wall side. If it is, you probably cut it a hair too short. Maybe give the boards a whack with a hammer and a scrap block of wood to see if it closes up. If the gap is on the outside but the boards are touching on the inside, the wall is probably out of true a bit causing the board to tilt back a hair. If it were me I would caulk it. Sometimes, a few passes with a sanding block on the back of the cut before nailing will help close it up.
 

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First of all, paint then cut. The edges will be sharp.
It could be that your jamb slightly protruded from the wall so the casing laid back too far, opening the face of the joint. There are two ways to remedy it if that caused it.
1. Shim behind the casing to pull it away from the wall enough to close the joint. It will leave a crack between the casing and wall that can be caulked and painted.
2. Put a thin shim under the piece when you cut it on the miter saw near the blade, slightly lifting the cut end. That will back cut the miter enough so the faces touch when installed. Glue it and it will stay tight. I have seen some carpenters use their pencil for a shim, but I use something a little thinner.
 
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And i must remember this one :: QUOTE: off a titch

reply #4 explains a whole bunch of problems i didn't have to contend with when i was framing pictures as a kid in a paint store. And i was awarded a generous supply of 1/64" putty of many colors.


Then several years later i saw something i really liked, a miter trimmer , but it was industrial hydraulic and cost more than my annual salary.
That miter saw was all there was when I was first doing trim work, electric ones hadn't come out yet. I loved that saw it was accurate as it gets. Mine was a Miller Falls or a Stanley, don't remember which. I wish I had another one like it.
 
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