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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello

I’ve tried everything: the medieval trap w spikes, poison worms, etc.

We have St Augustin’s & Bahia grasses w a Sandy loam soil. I installed an irrigation system in ranch yard so soul is perfect. It’s 2 acres fenced in on a 100 acre place near Columbus Tx.

Plz let me know what’s worked for you so I can get this problem under control.

Thank you very much !!
 

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nothing works in my area outside of the steel spike traps that must be manually set and monitored.
I am near a large lake that attracts migratory birds so I can't use poisons as the birds feast on the worms and grubs.
one mole can give the appearance that 20 of them live there - but, in actuality, there may only be one or two that is doing all the tunneling. so if you can manually eliminate them one-by-one, you will be ahead of the game. right now, I just don't have the patience to mess with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you John.

Re the poison worms, i create a hole w a pencil, stick in the worm leaving just enough to see if is taken. I have built Sm wooden sq boxes that i put over the worm, then a brick. This, to my knowledge, has never allowed the non targeted pest to consume. Never saw any signs of it.

Glad to hear that one mole can look like dozens. I’m not here long enough to monitor trap. But, will do so when I can

thank you
 

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Traps are pretty much the only effective solution but you have to have them on the current tunnels and figuring out which those are is not necessarily easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Traps are pretty much the only effective solution but you have to have them on the current tunnels and figuring out which those are is not necessarily easy.
I agree 100% Stick. That’s why I’m posting this thread
 

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If you kill moles, other moles will move in and use the existing tunnels. King snakes are the answer - they'll kill other snakes, are non venomous and very territorial.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks…King snakes do not blend in well w our landscape and hawks devastate them to full eradication. I’d love to be able to keep them here !
 

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WHEN ammo was available I would use .22 shot shells (rat shells) in my pistol.
NO it didn't get them all, but it sure felt danm good.

Sit out side in a chair and watch for the bumping up of the soil, pretend you are Elmer Fudd and go Mole/vole hunting.

Don't use the vibration gimmick things I think I saw them doing a polka to the beat once.
 

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I switched to using the NASH choker loop trap and killed 10 moles in my small yard in one season this past year. It's more satisfying than poison (which you can't verify actually killed them) because you actually get the mole to prove it. And if its not dead when you pull the trap up, throw it in a bucket of water and it's dead in about 3 seconds. More humane than the damn creature deserves for tearing up my lawn.

I'm sure there is a youtube video sonewhere on how to use it.
 

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I just send my dogs out, they find them every time. Then I just sit and wait for them to start moving again to use shovel to get them. Used to use traps but dogs have proven to be way more effective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Great ideas guys. !!!

I’m going to get some plastic boots, plastic explosives and order some of these traps and go at it…I’ll take some pics of the catches

anything else that works for you, pls post them as well / thanks a million !!

Bill Murray, lol
 

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Trapping active tunnels and grub control is a good long term strategy.

I use three of the Victor out of sight mole traps. Any trap will work but there is a learning curve. Most importantly is finding the active tunnels. Take the end of a broom, poke small holes in the tunnels, and mark the location of the hole with something (flag or stick). Come back in 24 hours and if the hole is covered up, then you know the tunnel is active. I also like to poke holes on either side of my trap so I know the direction the mole was coming from or if a mole made it past my trap unscathed.

Moles eat a variety of soil bugs. Earthworms are their favorite but are also fast. If an earthworm falls in their tunnel then it is an easy meal. Grubs are an easy meal for moles. When you see a tunnel that zig zags, those are most likely exploratory and hunting tunnels when a mole is looking for food. Rarely do they return and remain active in those tunnels. Long straight runs are frequently used and more likely to be an active trail. Moles use these tunnels to move about.

Preventative grub control is best done in the spring. Check local Ag extensions for timing. Scott’s grub ex works great when applied in April-June. The active ingredient, Chlorantraniliprole, does not work on mature grubs. If you need to kill mature grubs, then bio advance 24 hour grub killer is the way to go.

Moles will return each year, but it will be less and less and likely only stopping through in search for an easy meal. Once a mole learns that neighbors have a better selection of food they will leave your yard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Great post MB…really good to know the habits & routines of the enemy…i also believe you need both proactive & reactive means, grub control & traps, respectively. Eradicating the food source is essential

Any insight as to the small mounds of dirtpushed up from the raised tunnel? Note, these are not gopher mounds, which are distinctively different.

Thanks again.
 

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Great post MB…really good to know the habits & routines of the enemy…i also believe you need both proactive & reactive means, grub control & traps, respectively. Eradicating the food source is essential

Any insight as to the small mounds of dirtpushed up from the raised tunnel? Note, these are not gopher mounds, which are distinctively different.

Thanks again.
The moles home is below that mound. They push the extra dirt to the surface to make room for sleeping, mating and raising pups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
“The moles home is below that mound. They push the extra dirt to the surface to make room for sleeping, mating and raising pups.”

I’m going to put on my Bill Murray outfit and declare war at the homesteads. I’m thinking traps on all tunnels leading to a freshly raised mound should eliminate any escape routes. I’ll reset them again until no more catches, then move to the next pair..

Ever use the plastic worms? I poke a hole in an active tunnels /drop 1/2 of a worm w just enough exposed to see if it is eventually taken. I always cover the hole w 5 gal bucket & brick or two to insure on target pests are baited.
 

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I have used the poison worms. No idea if they worked. I don’t really like them. Trapping is effective and you know when you kill one. If more tunnels show up, you know you need to trap another. With poison if one dies and more tunnels show up, it can be frustrating because you think it’s not working. Also poison could potentially impact the food chain if a predator (hawk, owl, snake, cat) eats one.
 
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