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The stuff above is paint grade. I went to another lumber yard today and got some real nice AC fir at $42.00 a sheet. They even let me go into the warehouse and pick out the pieces I wanted. Will update as I make progress. Thanks again for the help BigJim.
 

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I'll make another thread showing the full progress soon. I don't want to hijack this one. Here's the nearly finished results.

Thank you for this thread, and for all of your help, BigJim. I truly appreciate it.

The laminate is Canyon Black by Wilsonart.




This is how they really look.






When I learn more about electricity, I plan to swap the outlets out with grey outlets. For now, I put the grey trim on.






Ignore the pan on the bar. :laughing: I moved it off of the stove when I took a picture of the stove, then forgot that I put it on the bar when I took this picture.






Next up is to get matching knobs and hinges, paint the cabinets, finish the bar top, and the floor. (Not exactly in that order.) I have the bar top built, but decided not to laminate it and do something else.
 

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Buddy, you did a fantastic job, looks great.
I couldn't have done it without your help. If not for this thread, I wouldn't have thought to ask some of the questions I did, and most likely would have used the wrong materials, or not completed it right the first time. Thank you! :thumbsup:
 

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I realize this is an old thread but I thought it might be worth posting here.

I am planning to make my own laminate countertop. How do I deal with 45* angles? I don't have my exact measurements yet. But, I have a u-shaped counter that will be longer than 8 feet and the peninsula end wil be wider than 4 feet. So, I will have to match up cut pieces of laminate/decking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I realize this is an old thread but I thought it might be worth posting here.

I am planning to make my own laminate countertop. How do I deal with 45* angles? I don't have my exact measurements yet. But, I have a u-shaped counter that will be longer than 8 feet and the peninsula end wil be wider than 4 feet. So, I will have to match up cut pieces of laminate/decking.
You can get HPL 5 feet wide X 12 feet long. If you are using a random pattern or solid color you can butt the joints instead of 45ing them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thanks. I am using a random pattern so I will butt the joints.
When you pick up your HPL ask to buy a matching tube of seam filler, sometimes it can come in handy.
 

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I am going to do butt joints but how is the best way to connect the tops. What I am thinking of doing is making my peninsula as one countertop. Then the run under the window as a second counter. Initially, I thought of using a piece of wood under the seam to connect the two counters. Today, I have been reading about countertop bolts. Would it be better to use bolts to connect the two pieces together?
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I like the bolts personally, below is a video showing how two tops are joined, I like tightbond III glue because it is waterproof and will hold like crazy. If you ever plan to take the top apart then I would go with a good silicone instead of the tightbond glue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuqv8xLMLSE

Be careful when getting the two tops tight, you want to get the bolts a little snug then align the HPL on top, be very careful, you can chip the plastic here. I usually use a piece of hardwood with a good crisp edge, lay it right on the edge of the HPL and tap the block, sometimes it you may have to hit it fairly hard. Once the tow tops are flush then finish tightening, do not over tighten the bolts, it can pucker the top at the joints.
 

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I am trying to figure out where to place the seam so that i can optimize the use of my materials. Is it a bad idea to place a seam over the dishwasher? My concerns are pressure from a heavy weight (ie, someone's butt) pushing down the seam or else humidity from the dishwasher ruining the seam?
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
That would not be the best place to seam a top, it is a weak spot and with the heat and steam from the washer it can swell the joint.
 

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I have my countertop ready to be laminated. I am using Wilsonart HD laminate with a crescent edge. For the two pieces of countertop beside the oven, in what order should I apply the laminate?...the front of the counter will have the crescent edge, the oven side will have a strip of laminate, and the top obviously will be laminated.

The diy directions I read say to do edges followed by top which I assume is to cover the edge laminate and avoid unsightly lines. My concern, which is likely being overthought, is the junction of the crescent edge and side edge laminate. How do I trim all of the surfaces while ensuring the overlap of the side edge and crescent edge is nice?

I struggled to clearly explain this, so it might be confusing.

Also, wilsonart calls for a specific glue. I was planning to use contact cement for the top and edges, but the diy class for a specific edge glue. Suggestions?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
It is a little hard to see exactly what you are talking about, the strip of HPL on the oven cabinet, does that serve as a back splash against the oven cabinet?

Here is the instructions of how to install the edging and top. You will have to do a practice piece or two until you get the edge dead flush with the top of the HPL. I used Tight bond III because it is water proof, when selecting the staples to shoot from the bottom be sure the staples are the right length or they will shoot through the top of the HPL and ruin it, too short and it will not catch the tongue.

I kinda shied away from using staples especially that close to the edge of the top, strange things can happen once you pull the trigger. With the tight bond III and clamps and tape that should hold the edge once the glue has set.

Here is the link:
http://www.wilsonart.com/docs/defau...corative-edge-fabrication-manual.pdf?sfvrsn=4

If I am not understanding your question I apologize, maybe a picture or two. :)
 

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Okay, here goes...I have looked at some pictures and done more reading which may or may not have helped my understanding.

Obviously, the top of the counter will get Wilsonart laminate.

On edge B, I will be adding the Wilsonart crescent edge.

Edge A is the source of confusion, On edge A, I thought I would be putting a strip of laminate taken from the excess laminate trimmed from the 5'x12' sheet. I wasn't sure how I would add the main laminate to the top of the counter, trim it with a router, then add the crescent edge to side B and the strip of laminate to Edge A, all while routing/filing to get good edges.

After looking at some pictures, it looks as though the crescent edge would be applied to both edges A and B. I am guessing that this is done by trimming some width off of the counter to allow for the thicker crescent edge to fit.

I hope this is clearer.

Finally, I went to my local store and there is no tite-bond glue. There is gorilla glue waterproof. The nearest store to purchase tite-bond is 1.5 hours away. To do this right, I will go for a drive. Will the gorilla glue be suitable for the edging?
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
You are right, you would run a strip of HPL on side A. Side A will need to be installed before installing the top HPL because the top HPL should over lap the edging of side A. You would then install the top piece of HPL, then last you would install the front edging. The down side is, the ends of the front edging will show raw fiber core.

You can not cover the ends of the front edging, because there would be the black edge of the small piece of HPL needed to cover the end of the front edging and it would show from the front and top. I have never run into this situation in all the years I did HPL work. Most of my tops had wood edging or HPL edging or T mold edging.

The way I would trim the front edge of the top, so it would be dead straight to receive the edging of side B, is cover edge A, then cover the top then rip the front edge with a table saw. Make sure to rip with the good side up and the strip on edge A the leading edge into the saw. If the side A is the trailing end, when you cut, the edging will chip or pull loose.

Regular yellow carpenter's glue will work on the front edge, I wouldn't chance the gorilla glue. Gorilla glue needs to be dampened with water to work well and you do not need the front edging wet. Gorilla glue would need to be clamped as it can swell the edging away from the top and look really bad.

I don't have a suggestion on the raw edges of the front edging. If it weren't beveled, you could return the ends back into the top and the ends wouldn't show, but with the beveled edge there would be a small spot of raw edge showing where the bevel met the front of the top.
 

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When you are doing a bevel edge, does it go on all edges...specifically, would it go on the edge beside the stove? Can you post a picture of what the counter edges look like when using a bevel edge beside he stove if you have one?

I am tempted to use the crescent edge on both edges. This will eliminate the exposed mdf, but will result in a bit of a gap between the stove and counter.
 
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