DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I have a multi-piece birdbath-style concrete fountain in my backyard and I'm worried about kids knocking it over and being injured as it falls on them.

Any suggestions on how I can bond the various stacked pieces together? I want to avoid drilling and bolting. Mortar (what kind)? Some sort of epoxy (again, what kind)?

Thanks!

Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
had 1 of those ( apron/vest store ) but that model had a rod connecting all pieces,,, epoxy is stronger than conc so if a little rug-rat hits it, the conc will spall while the epoxy holds onto the spalled conc,,, i LIKE drills & bolts :thumbup:
 

·
Too Short? Cut it Again!
Joined
·
9,634 Posts
Silicon caulk is not really an adhesive. Epoxy will bond everything together but the good ones for concrete? You may never be able to move them apart. So make sure it is where you want it before you plan on being able to move it easily again.

www.abatron.com is a company I get stuff from but I am sure you local paint store or hardware store with real people working will have ideas. The box store aprons will just stare blindly at you.

The fasteners may be the best idea but I am having trouble visualizing how they they would work. Obviously, if there is room, just anchoring everything around some pipe running up the center should keep it from coming apart in pieces if the kids tackle it by accident.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great tips, thanks!

I had a "hmmmm" moment and thought I'd call a concrete fountain company for their recommendations: Mortar or... Gorilla Glue!

I like the idea of being able to disassemble this thing later. Gorilla Glue, epoxy, and other construction adhesives might prove problematic for disassembly. It seems that chipping away at mortar with a masonry chisel would be the surest solution so I'm thinking I'll go with that.

Thanks again!

Chuck
 

·
Too Short? Cut it Again!
Joined
·
9,634 Posts
Just curious, just where are you planning to put this 9,000 ton thing where you are worried kids are going to tackle and tumble it? Maybe a smaller fountain feature in a place they would not play would be a possibility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The fountain will be in a garden on the perimeter of a sod lawn. Each of the five or so components is light enough for one man to carry. I estimate that the bowl weighs about 80 pounds. Last weekend I poured a round 6" thick concrete pad about 2" larger diameter than the base of the fountain. The fountain stands about four feet tall.

My intent is just to do a little due dilligence to reduce-not completely eliminate-the chance that an accidental trip-and-fall against the fountain will resulting in injury.
 

·
Concrete & Masonry
Joined
·
3,890 Posts
The fountain will be in a garden on the perimeter of a sod lawn. Each of the five or so components is light enough for one man to carry. I estimate that the bowl weighs about 80 pounds. Last weekend I poured a round 6" thick concrete pad about 2" larger diameter than the base of the fountain. The fountain stands about four feet tall.

My intent is just to do a little due dilligence to reduce-not completely eliminate-the chance that an accidental trip-and-fall against the fountain will resulting in injury.
Good for you for thinking ahead on this........:thumbsup:

I would simply use an adhesive that bonds well to concrete & masonry, like PL Landscape adhesive (in a green, white, & black caulk tube).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good for you for thinking ahead on this........:thumbsup:

I would simply use an adhesive that bonds well to concrete & masonry, like PL Landscape adhesive (in a green, white, & black caulk tube).
JOMAMA: What about future disassembly? Can I cut through that adhesive later?
 

·
Member
Joined
·
185 Posts
You may be able to cut thru with a sawzall if you leave a room for the blade to be placed in now...

Or just use adhesive PL on the outer edges
and heat them up latter on when you're ready with a plumbing torch..once it gets hot it will separate easily
 

·
Concrete & Masonry
Joined
·
3,890 Posts
From my experience with the PL adhesive, or similar ones, they don't come apart easily, at least for the first few years. A sledge hammer may be the best tool for dis-assembly, or just plan to move it as one unit if you really need to.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top