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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My very old house addition is only about a foot or two off the ground and is on piers. I have a foundation company fixing the fact that that a third of the addition is sagging SEVERELY into the ground — the two end supports had completely disappeared (maybe they were wood and disintegrated?). They have dug out all around and are about to replace the rotted main outer beams and install eight new "bigfoot" piers all around. I'm investing $8000 into that.

My question is, once they are done, how should I enclose the under space? With a skirt? A graded water proofing layer under the ground? Finance is an issue but that also means, I can't afford to pay crazy heating bills either.

I'm in Nova Scotia, Canada with cold winters and lots of rain.

Note: I just purchased this house and those outer corners were probably rotted from a constant downpour of water for years due to an unmaintained gutter system that dumped all the roof water to those two spots. I fixed that, which made a big difference, but there is still some regular sump pump activity. The main house foundation is made of rock and also leaky but I think mostly from the addition portion. I need to address gutters, grading and sealing on the main foundation myself (can't afford to pay any more). I know I also need to address the grading of the yard as a whole as well. My resources will be a shovel, wheelbarrow and materials I can buy at the hardware store. Any advice or references I can go to on this would be greatly appreciated too.



 

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I don't think you can delete it; a Moderator can do that.
Perhaps put a link to this page on the other page or vice versa so responders can go to one page; it gets confusing otherwise.
Sorry, I've no good suggestion, but some will. Be patient, may take 1/2 to 1 day as some work full time or have a life.
 

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I would bury concrete boards between the piers. Hang them off pt frame and wrap the top edge with heavy gauge metal sheets (pests and termites). Board is to keep pests from digging under and making nests under your house. I've heard that some pests can chew through the concrete boards as well, but if I were in your shoes, that's the cheapest solution I would use. If the floor is low enough, they can nest in the floor and wall bays as well. Then install outside sump pit with drain pipes all around and fill the bottom 12" of the concrete board with 1-2" gravel. Gravel will discourage pests that dig deep.
Zoeller pump can last a few years through winters.
 

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What you want to do is called under pinning (maybe with a hyphen). A search may yield more products and info.

There are modern products made for mobile homes that are 100% vinyl consisting of a top and bottom track and vertical panels inserted into them. Nailed to the ground with large spikes and attached to the home with screws or nails.

The old way way to use ground contact rated lumber to build a frame under the edge of the house and then cover that with tin than was stamped to look like concrete blocks. If using this method I would support the wood framing on bricks or blocks. Metal roofing material was also often used.

You can also pour a baby footer and use landscape blocks or concrete blocks. Your piers are supporting the home. Anything you do is for looks and wind.

I actually pored a footer and laid blocks under a couple of additions built this way. That takes some serious time, materials and expense.
 
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i recently had a wildlife removal company find a new home for a skunk living under my shed. after skunk removed he put up galvanized wire mesh (1" square design) to cover the gap sinking 6" below bent the mesh 'L' shaped out towards the lawn then backfilled back to grade.

using the mesh keeps the large critters out but allows for air to flow which was important to me because i was very low to the ground, 6".. less in some places.
 
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