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The blocking should be double thick under the sides of the door to support the king and jack studs for the door.
This makes a lot of sense. Previously, there actually was no blocking supporting the king and jack studs of the door because the blocking was outside of the plane of the wall. The 2nd floor subfloor and bottom plate were sagging as a result. I was blown away that the builders did not use proper support.

To install the blocking, would you recommend toe nailing them to the joists, or is there some other method?

You should add some tie backs too.
Do you have a recommendation on how many? Eg. One for every 15ft of ledger?

Thanks again!!
 

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retired framer
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This makes a lot of sense. Previously, there actually was no blocking supporting the king and jack studs of the door because the blocking was outside of the plane of the wall. The 2nd floor subfloor and bottom plate were sagging as a result. I was blown away that the builders did not use proper support.

To install the blocking, would you recommend toe nailing them to the joists, or is there some other method?


Do you have a recommendation on how many? Eg. One for every 15ft of ledger?

Thanks again!!
California may have code for the tie backs but I would think one for ever 3 joists as you blocks are not as good as a rim joist.
Years ago it was normal to cantilever for a 3 or 4 ft deck with blocking so you may be looking at the second deck where some one knocked out the blocks and cut the joists off.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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I know this is an old thread, but I have a similar situation. My question is: is there a better way to attach the blocking to the floor joists? Is there a Simpson connector/bracket/fastener, that could be used that would provide more strength to the blocking and therefore a sturdier attachment point for the ledger?
Not exactly your question in regard to attaching blocking....

BUT Yes...Simson makes a connector that bolts/screws to the side of your floor joist (spacing between joists an eng call) .....with a threaded type rod (maybe allthread) then designed to actually come thru your ledger to tie to a decking joist.....but I would think it could also just tie in your ledger in less demanding structural circumsatnces.

It is designed for tall decks, maybe in earthquake or wind country, under demanding tie-in structural circumstances.
 

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Yes . cut them flush with the plywood and new blocking flush with the plywood works
The blocking should be double thick under the sides of the door to support the king and jack studs for the door.
You should add some tie backs too.
View attachment 664946
If you don't have access from below you can add the inside part from outside and add the ready rod with a nut on both sides of the bracket and pre drill the block and ledger to fit over the rod.
The blocking will stop the deck from falling with the lag bolts
The tie back holds it in a quake.
This way is by far the most correct and long lasting solution
 

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Just want to say thanks for the responses. They were extremely helpful.

Also want to share that in addition to the DTT2Z tie back that @Nealtw shared, I also found the following DTT1Z tie back which looks much easier to install in areas where I don't have access to the floor joists inside the house.

Rectangle Font Parallel Design Pattern
 

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retired framer
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Just want to say thanks for the responses. They were extremely helpful.

Also want to share that in addition to the DTT2Z tie back that @Nealtw shared, I also found the following DTT1Z tie back which looks much easier to install in areas where I don't have access to the floor joists inside the house.
Consider the failure you are trying to prevent.
Rectangle Wood Font Parallel Plan
 

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Yeah, I did consider that vulnerability. I'm thinking of using the DTT2Z in the areas where I have access to the floor joists from inside the house.

On areas where I don't have access to the floor joist from inside the house, I will still use the DTT2Z, but fewer of them because they will be very tricky to install in those areas. I'll have to pre-attach the bracket and rod to the floor joist, drill a hole in the blocking and thread the rod through it, install the blocking, then drill a hole in the ledger for the rod and ensure that it all lines up and that it is also lined up with the deck joist to attach the other bracket to the rod. So I'd like to use fewer of those and supplement them with some of the DTT1Z. I have about 70 ft of ledger that I need to attach, so I think this will be tricky....
 

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retired framer
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Yeah, I did consider that vulnerability. I'm thinking of using the DTT2Z in the areas where I have access to the floor joists from inside the house.

On areas where I don't have access to the floor joist from inside the house, I will still use the DTT2Z, but fewer of them because they will be very tricky to install in those areas. I'll have to pre-attach the bracket and rod to the floor joist, drill a hole in the blocking and thread the rod through it, install the blocking, then drill a hole in the ledger for the rod and ensure that it all lines up and that it is also lined up with the deck joist to attach the other bracket to the rod. So I'd like to use fewer of those and supplement them with some of the DTT1Z. I have about 70 ft of ledger that I need to attach, so I think this will be tricky....
Yes it will be pain in the ass but well worth the effort If you have an air compressor, you might rent a strapshot gun that shoots hanger nails.
And yes some is better than non.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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I do have a compressor, and that's a great suggestion! That would save me a ton of time.
Or at least, with probably les expense and better placement/access, grap a palm nailer.
 
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