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I am considering adding storage space to my Dell Optiplex 755. I don't know much about this except I assume it involves either plugging something into the motherboard or using a desktop unit that plugs in through a USB port. I am going to be doing some video editing and I need space for all my footage. This is a separate concern from data backup, for which I plan to acquire two external hard drives (which I asked about in another thread).

What is the best way to go about this? I am already worried about external hard drives' rate of failure. Is it any better for internal hard drives/internal SSDs/desktop additions? Obviously this includes the added consideration that I will be working off the unit every day for about 8 hours, so it has to be hearty enough to deal with that.

Thank you for any advice!
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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For the cost of all the additions, you could buy a completely new computer to do this video editing on.

And probably save some money, and then sell the new to another owner for a big discount, after you be sure that you remove all the sensitive (personal) data that you put on it .


ED
 

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Hard drives are very affordable and easy to move to a new computer if you decide to change it.

You need to make sure your system has a unused sata connection, place to install a second hard drive and sata power connector.

There are power adapters and sata add on cards if you don't have the connections.

All in all you can add 1Tb of extra storage by adding a second hard drive for under $100 worst case if you can do it yourself. The drive itself may only be like $50 to $60.

I wouldn't use an external hard drive for primary storage, unless there's no space inside to add an extra hard drive. The internal drive interface is far better than usb.

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It looks like there are different versions of your machine.

It looks like a core 2 duo which while not very powerful by today's standards is still very capable. Now, if you want to encode loads of 1080p and 4k videos which need filtering and compression, it may make more sense to get i5 or i7 based system than add storage.

For the odd video it will do fine.


Can you give me the complete model number - usually on a sticker on the side with service info.

Open the case and see if there's an extra spot for a hard drive.
 

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I don't think that system was designed to handle video editing at least not according to the specs I've seen.


With a better processor and more memory and a a computer that supports more than one drive adding a hard drive id simple and cheap. My understanding is that a hard drive is a better choice than an SSD for video editing.
 
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I don't think that system was designed to handle video editing at least not according to the specs I've seen.


With a better processor and more memory and a a computer that supports more than one drive adding a hard drive id simple and cheap. My understanding is that a hard drive is a better choice than an SSD for video editing.
A core 2 duo is fine for some casual video editing. it's all people used before i5/i7s came out.

Memory upgrades are easy.

You're right about using an SSD - too much re-writing can shorten lifespan.
 

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Challenge Everything!
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OP is asking for Storage upgrade. OK. 8 TB can be had for $120.00.
If you can do Video editing with that machine, I doubt it very much. That Dell Optiplex 755 is from 2008, is using DDR2, and at 8 or 16 GB maxed out. If the Board even accept 16 GB (4x4 GB modules).

the Board has 4 Sata and 1 eSata connectors.

Best of luck.
 

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^What's the speed of that compared to an internal drive?

You don't need more than 8Gb of ram for some casual video editing. Of course it will work for video editing - what do you think even professionals used for HD video pre-2010 before the more modern chips?

Core 2 duo or quad.

encoding time would be shorter with a newer chip for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the advice! I have decided to just empty my current PC hard drive onto three external hard drives (all data on each drive), and then use the space that's left, which will be sufficient for the work i need to do.
 

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^What's the speed of that compared to an internal drive?

You don't need more than 8Gb of ram for some casual video editing. Of course it will work for video editing - what do you think even professionals used for HD video pre-2010 before the more modern chips?

Core 2 duo or quad.

encoding time would be shorter with a newer chip for sure.
What specs do I need for video editing?
Here are your basic specs to look for when buying a computer for video editing: Memory/RAM: 8-32 GB RAM or as much as you can afford (ideally at least 16GB) Processor: Multi-core Intel i5/i7/i9 models (i9 is best). Preferably 4 or more processor cores.

:vs_laugh:
 

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the topic of this thread was never minimum specs for video editing.

op is not going to buy a new computer just to reduce editing encoding time especially if it's a casual project. most people don't have the $$$ to blow on replacing stuff that still works.

i agree if you're buying a new machine specifically for video editing it better be at least a modern quad core.
 

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the topic of this thread was never minimum specs for video editing.

op is not going to buy a new computer just to reduce editing encoding time especially if it's a casual project. most people don't have the $$$ to blow on replacing stuff that still works.

i agree if you're buying a new machine specifically for video editing it better be at least a modern quad core.
People need to wake up and get out of the 90's.
The last Video Editing Rig I built in 2018 was close to $5000.
It had all the Bells, dual Nvidia Quadro, M2.A SSD's, Intel i7 Xtreme, 64 GB Memory, Rack mounted Case, 1400 Watt PSU, Capture Cards, you name it.
That IS a true Video-Editor.
Everything else are just Toys.
:wink2:
 

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if people using old hardware bothers you so much, send the op a $5000 certified cheque to "get out of the '90s" and buy a top of the line machine for a video editing project. :)
 

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@user_12345a, I get your point.

Just going to completely ignore your last post.:wink2:

But, what Folks need to realize is:

Before buying into huge Storage for their Video Files, figure out a way to see if your machine is even capable of editing, or "God-forbid" RENDER those Files.
Trust me when I say this:
A Core 2 Duo ain't going to cut it.
Just look at the minimum or "recommended" System configurations at
Sony Vegas Pro
or
Adobe Premiere [insert any version]

Cheers,
:vs_cool:
 

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i used to edit/filter old footage 480p on an athlon xp with noise filters, it was slow as heck but it worked. (think 0.7fps for the noise filter on virtual dub, i would leave it for a 1.5 days to process an hour of footage!)

unless the old chip is missing instruction sets, it should work but be slow when encoding 1080p.

i do imagine the casual editor won't be using premiere or something - more like the built in windows tool or a free open source one.
 
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