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I'm trying to find out how much weight a stud can hold. The studs are 2x4 correctly built into my home (or so i hope...) Assuming the mounted objects are mounted to the the stud with a mount that has the height to width ration correct and equal to the weight and directional pull of the object being mounted.

so basically the object is being mounted 100% correct. so assume this is not the factor. only an omni-dimensional object of infinitely altering weight is being connected to a stud. how much weight or pull could the stud withhold before breaking free of the truss or floor, or splitting in half or something

i know this sounds ridiculous but i am almost daily mounting things to the walls. something i never thought of previously in my years of varying construction trades or other home lives. here though in my home i mostly practice my new trade and its come to grab my attention that 2k lbs mounted to my wall might not be a good idea. or 100 lb projector screen mounted lengthwise along the living room truss. the most free running unsupported one in the house i think. except the garage. or a 100+lb ceiling or high wall mounted subwoofer and speaker stack.

i don't mean to sound cryptic or confusing, i am just trying to learn maybe a good formula i can use to be safe. i can get bigger mounts to more evenly distribute weight, that isn't the issue. i have mounted MANY things so far and damn near hung from all of them. actually i did hang from my projector screen mounts.

i like to be analytical and correct structurally. i hope this makes sense as it was a lot to wright!


last add! its like towing a car. how much engine power is required to pull a vehicle. ignore the size and weight of both vehicles and ignore the media connecting them. only the ratio of say, horsepower and torque to resistance.
 

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Instead of trying to determine how much load a stud can "hold", I suggest you take a one or two semester class in spelling, grammar and English to master the use of the word "weight" and/or "wait" regarding engineering and usage in structural applications (both static and dynamic at varying frequencies).

Next, I would make a series of tests to determine the properties and materials associated with the actual application intended under varying temperatures. - Don't forget the influence of the installation methods proposed. Also consider the half-life of the elements used to assist in the long-term durability.

Then analyze the structure and materials affected by the weight of the omni-dimensional object that is proposed, including the potential loads that may be encountered or added in the future, such as paint and ice or snow.

The alternate is to select and install a nail or screw of your choice (or glue it) and see how smart you are.

Dick
 

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& i thought i was the only 1,,, we're fast becoming a nation that can't communicate w/ea other even if english is our native tongue
 
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