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I'm designing a garden shed and started thinking about the snow! Dimensions so far are 6ft. x 10ft. lean-to style roof with a 12 degree slope. Roof panels are 3/4" fir plywood supported by 2x4 horizontals at 12 degree slope supported on ends by 2x4 verticals, spaced 24" apart. I'm anticipating worst case scenario for my climate is 2 ft of medium heavy snow which would put about 60-65 lbs./sq.ft. on the roof.
Will the structure support that weight? I'm limited for headroom so can't build truss-type roof.
 

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2x4 rafters can't support much, especially at 24" centers. I'd imagine a 6' span won't be a major problem though. It is underbuilt in my opinion given your snow load, but the 3/4" plywood may add some strength too.
 

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2x4 rafters can't support much, especially at 24" centers. I'd imagine a 6' span won't be a major problem though. It is underbuilt in my opinion given your snow load, but the 3/4" plywood may add some strength too.
I agree.

Snow is heavy but your shed is only 6 feet wide. Still I would put in some more 2x4's so you have 12 inch centers. This will be more than needed to hold up lots of snow.
 

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Thanks for the second opinions - I feared as much.
What do you think about 2x6 rafters on 20" centers?
Are you planning on shingling this roof or tinning?
Now if you were to tin this roof what you have would be more then sufficienct for the fact that you woudln't have standing snow or ice!
If this is a shingle application the yes you are underbuilt for the snow application!
And if you are going with tin you have the ability to reduce your dry weight extremely. Unless you already purchased your material then you can hang tin on 3/8" ply (thus first weight reduction), and the weight of your tin, will also cause a great weight reduction, but give you outstanding weather protection! Besides if you do decide to go with tin(assuming you aint already purchased shingles) then theirs a special inexpensive trick you can do to ensure you dont have standing snow!!! Hehehehe!

(I am not a dealer/saleman of this product, and i am not pushing this product. This link was included for informational purposes only, to give op, and idea of what i was talking about, since so many might not be familiar with todays newer and improved tin products)
I wanted to add a link to give an example of the item as I have described, above to give a better idea of what i am talking about!
http://www.bestbuymetals.com/r-panel-metal-roofing.html
Though this link does not give a break down of weight capacity per:sqr ft, my neighbor installs it, and he says it is good for 200lbs per sqr, ft'.
I witnessed installation of this prodcut at another neighbor house and the installers were standing on this tin and i watched this with my own eyes, and their was no flex on the panels at all. Now mayeb the guys knew were to stand at the strongest of points, but regardless it was awesome to see the tin hold up the guys with this tin product attached directly to the studs with no under layment!( no sheating)
 
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