DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Doing it myself
Joined
·
3,838 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering. This house has 4 but we never use them.

:huh::eek:
 

·
Licensed electrician
Joined
·
13,387 Posts
How many volts and watts are the heaters?
 

·
Doing it myself
Joined
·
3,838 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I wish I could answer that, and i figured that would be the first response that I got. :)


I've tried looking for a data plate on them, but there isn't one anywhere that is accessible. Without removing the unit from the wall completely and checking the back and the bottom, I am at a loss.

Is it common to have multiple heaters on a circuit?
 

·
Licensed electrician
Joined
·
13,387 Posts
I would not have a problem with multiple heaters on one circuit.

Typically baseboard heaters are 250 watts per foot.

For example a 4 footer would be 1000 watts. 1000/240 = just over 4 amps or just over 8 at 120 volts.
 

·
Doing it myself
Joined
·
3,838 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Sounds like I am in the clear here then. Someday I would like to put in a heat pump system anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,021 Posts
u could use a clamp on ammeter to measure the current draw. Use the same usual amperage ratings, such as 15 amps for 14 gauge wires, for either 120 or 240 volt heaters. The actual total draw must be 80% or less of the wire rating since heaters are "continuous" loads. The full wire rating is based on "intermittent" loads, things not expected to be drawing continuously for more than an hour or so.
 

·
Licensed electrician
Joined
·
13,387 Posts
The NEC defines continuous as 3 hours or more. Two hours 59 minutes, 59 seconds and off would be non-continuous.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top