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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The movers dropped a treadmill deck and it smashed the corner bead. It's about 6" long. Is this just a matter of taking a hack saw and cutting out the damaged part and replacing it with a section of corner bead, then plastering over it, or is more involved to do it right?

Movers are paying for it but because of the current situation, their repair guys are not working right now. They will pay me if I can fix it myself.

Thanks
 

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Yes you can cut it out & install a section to line it up & keep it inline with the existing use 2 # 8 finishing nails insert the nails into the existing bead where the cut was made use plyers to pinch them in place than install the new piece & secure the legs & replaster.
If you have access to acoustical hanger wire it will also work.
 

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Before I went to that much trouble I'd hammer it back into place and fill/shape it with a setting compound like Durabond.
If the situation warrants it, I would just cut the damaged portion out so that the surrounding areas are flush with each wall, then fill it all in with Durabond without any corner bead. If done in several layers, there should be a minimal amount of sanding to do and the finished corner will be rock hard.

futtyos
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is Durabond considered a catalyzed hard filler? Someone told me to use that because it sets up quickly, but when I search those terms, the only thing I find that is similar is Bondo. Is that what he is referring to?
 

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I suppose you could say that Durabond is similar to Bondo but that is kind of a stretch.
Durabond is setting compound, another common brand is EasySand. Setting compounds are a powder that you mix with water. Mixed setting compound has a set working life after mixed, it does not use a separate catalyst. I've always been partial to Durabond, it dries harder than EasySand but that also makes it harder to sand so it pays to apply it neatly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Can you apply Durabond or Easy Sand about 1" thick and have it be stable? I was unable to pull out the corner bead at all. It's really jammed in there and hard to get any grip on it.
 

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Unlike regular j/c setting compounds can be applied thicker because they dry chemically, not by evaporation. At 1" thick you'll likely need 2 coats as it may be difficult to keep the mud in place as it sets.
 

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Can you apply Durabond or Easy Sand about 1" thick and have it be stable? I was unable to pull out the corner bead at all. It's really jammed in there and hard to get any grip on it.
If the walls on either side of the smashed corner bead are flat and not bulging out, you can just use Durabond to fill in each side. If you are worried about the Durabond sticking to the metal, you might try drilling 6-10 1/4" holes into the corner bead. On your first coat of Durabond, use a rubber kitchen spatula to push the Durabond into the holes before using your spackle knife to apply the Durabond onto either side. When you mix the Durabond, make sure that the final mix is thick enough so that it doesn't look like it will move or sag downward when you get a big glob of it on your spackle kinife and hold the knife blade vertical to the floor (so that the Durabond would have the best chance of falling off the knife if it were too thin). This way you will know that the Durabond will not sag very much after you apply it onto the corner.

When you are done spackling the corner, clean out the remaining Durabond onto a paper bag or something you can throw out when the Durabond gets hard. Check the leftover Durabond about 5 minutes or so after the number of minutes the bag says (Durabond 25, 60, 90) to see if it has become hard. When it has become hard, but not yet dry, take your spackle knife and see if the Durabond on the corner bead is flush with the walls. If there is Durabond bowing out from the repair, carefully use your spackle knife to "shave" the excess Durabond off so that the repair is either flush or concave with each wall. This helps you avoid any sanding.

The next day, after the Durabond has completely dried, use your spackle knife to shave off any little nubs that you may have missed. If you find that the Durabond has pushed out a little overnight, you might have to sand until the repaired area is flush with the walls.

When you have done that, put a 2nd coat of Durabond over the repair. If you get a small ridge on top of the corner, you might be able to let this harden and dry before shaving it down with your spackle knife. If a 3rd coat of Durabond is needed, go for it. Just make sure that you do not overfill with Durabond as it is very difficult to sand.

If the walls on either side of the corner bead cannot be made flat when dragging a long straight edge across, you might want to use a multi-tool to cut out the damaged section out so that both walls are or can be made either flat or concave before applying Durabond.

It takes a bit to get used to using Durabond, but when you do, you will be able to make rock solid repairs.

IMPORTANT! After mixing and using Durabond, clean up any tools or mud pans soon before any remaining Durabond hardens and dries. I like to use a green Scotch Brite pad under running water to do this. If you fail to do this cleaning, you will discover why I said this. :)

siffleur
 

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I'd be leery of using spackling for this repair as it doesn't dry very hard and would be susceptible to damage if the corner gets bumped with something. Durabond dries harder than any other setting compound I've used. Spackling or ready mix j/c is a little easier to work with.
 

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I'd be leery of using spackling for this repair as it doesn't dry very hard and would be susceptible to damage if the corner gets bumped with something. Durabond dries harder than any other setting compound I've used. Spackling or ready mix j/c is a little easier to work with.
Hitting the corner like they did, anything other then steel wouldn't have been hard enough.

I would do it either your way or mine and add some corner protectors. In fact a corner protector might cover it.



Forgot to add the link.

https://kofflersales.com/p/stainless-steel-corner-guards.asp?cid=56
 
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