DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay

I bought the stuff I need to build this door jamb can anyone tell me how to put it together?

I have a doorless doorway. framed at 80-3/4" X 49"

thIS WILL BE a doorway with no doors.

I went to a place that specializes in doors and bought the 4-9/16 oak ven jam. and the casing.

questions.
1. whats this type of doorway called?(ive been trying too google it)
2. do i nail the 4-9/16 oak ven jam in first? or do i measure cut and nail together then install it?
3. I would assume the casing goes last and is pretty straight forward.

Thanks to all who will help me.
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
so, you're just building a casement to 'wrap' a door opening for no door. got a picture? easier for us to see what you have to work with.
i'd put the 4-9/16 on first, then add casing myself. how do you plan to finish off the top? i 'm finishing my doors and window casements like this, if it helps.
http://www.diychatroom.com/f50/vertical-wood-blinds-45533/

Po)

DM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Man that looks awewsome!!!!!!!!!!!!! Great job.

NO pics for me. Im doing something very similar.

I am finishing my basement.
I have a 2X4 framed doorway 80-3/4" tall by 49" wide.
just want to "wrap" the doorway as you said I guess.

Thanks dangermouse.
Can you guide me through this?
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
i'm sure lots of us here can pitch in. Po) what do you have for the front and back casing/moulding... (sides and top?)
mdf? what are the materials here?

DM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i have oak casing to match the jam. smaller bout 2.5 inches approx.?

the jams 3 pieces 6ft 8inches each. need to cut these to fit.
all have a notch cut out ("L" shaped).
i am assuming thats for the top piece to lay across?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
do you take the legs of the jam all the way to the floor?
or raise slightly? if so, how much?
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
what is the floor now, or what is it going to be? if you have the floor you want, go right to it flush.

DM
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
It is too easy to get everything out of line if you attempt to put the pieces up one-by-one.

Build the frame like this first, and install it as a unit. Then later, fit it with casing.

The example here is 1-1/2" stock.
 

Attachments

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
well sure Willie, you can cut it to size and piece it together to be sure it's perfect before mounting it, but only if you want to do it the RIGHT way....

DM
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
well sure Willie, you can cut it to size and piece it together to be sure it's perfect before mounting it, but only if you want to do it the RIGHT way....

DM
I do apologize. I fully understand the benefits of doing a job three times to get it nearly right. It's good practice, and you become very familiar with all the details. But I'm lazy, and really only want to do things once.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,248 Posts
I usually just put the top piece up 1st, then put the sides on
I make sure when I frame it out that its level
Then put the casing on each side
As long as everything is square its fairly easy
Of course this house & the last are not new
And the last house the only thing that was square/level was my square :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
The diagram that is shown forgoe the rabbit (groove) in the head (top) piece and most of the prefabed kits they sell have the legs with a recess the thickness of the jambs. This is simple as you see in the diagram turn those side jambs 180 so the flange is on the outside (you don't have to rabbit the top this way as in the diagram). Then glue and pin the top jamb and side jambs together. I do not intend this message to say that process is wrong so please don't yell at me LOL It will work either way I just think we can simplify it for the OP.

Then insert the built wrap in the opening, shim and secure just like you are setting a door. If you have any questions on how the jamb will look, go peek at the doors that are already installed in your home and you will more than likely see the configuration on how to pin this wrap together.

Then case it out and voila you are done!

Good luck and be safe!
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
The diagram that is shown forgoe the rabbit (groove) in the head (top) piece and most of the prefabed kits they sell have the legs with a recess the thickness of the jambs. This is simple as you see in the diagram turn those side jambs 180 so the flange is on the outside (you don't have to rabbit the top this way as in the diagram). Then glue and pin the top jamb and side jambs together. I do not intend this message to say that process is wrong so please don't yell at me LOL It will work either way I just think we can simplify it for the OP.

Then insert the built wrap in the opening, shim and secure just like you are setting a door. If you have any questions on how the jamb will look, go peek at the doors that are already installed in your home and you will more than likely see the configuration on how to pin this wrap together.

Then case it out and voila you are done!

Good luck and be safe!
Yes, we can do a lot to make things simpler. We could simply cut nothing, and just nail the thing together. But it is even more important for a beginner to learn the most correct and solid way.

Although most store-bought jambs are, indeed, cut the way you described, the way they are intended to be assembled allows for the possibility of the jambs to move away from the header. All that is holding the header firmly in place is the nails you drive down from the top. Not good enough at times.

The groove (It's a dado, by the way, not a rabbet) absolutely locks each jamb in at a designated location, and they cannot move unless the force to do so is strong enough to break the wood.

People will generally take the easier way if one exists. No problem. But I want to be certain that people coming here for help have a choice of doing a job in the most professional and workman like manner possible. This poster now sees one of those ways, and he understands the reason for doing the job like that.

Most likely, he won't do it the way I drew. But should he one day notice his jamb twisting, and revealing a gap, then he just may remember that he chose the shorter road. Perhaps next time he won't.

Attention to details like this are the very reasons we all constantly make comments about how good the craftsmanship was "in the old days".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Very true and you are right it is a dado I just had a brain fart sorry. I just don't think that the common individual coming here will take the time nor will have the expertise to dado the jamb stock precise enough to make it work so I applied the KISS rule. I figure that the door manufacturers use the method I described and if they glue it and nail it FROM THE SIDES that they will have a jamb that will last them until the next time they remodel. The inportant thing is that they glue and nail it and install with shims but if they nail from the top and fail to glue the joint it definitly will fail and twist.

I use the method I described in my work and if I have a custom project I would use your method however that is a method of joinery most clients are unwilling to pay for. And the dado does not necessarily mean that the head jamb will not twist right?

It is all in the craft and the craftsman that is performing the work that matters after all what we create truely is our legacy and is what we stake our claim on.

Take care and be safe!

James
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top