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Discussion Starter #22
With that size you would need a ridge beam and purlins with support to the ground every so many feet thru the building or a timber frame ever so many feet to support it all.
In this picture, I don't see anything going from roof framing to floor. I was told today that I could make a ridge beam as long as I want by splicing it as long as it meets the engineer requirements.
 

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retired framer
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In this picture, I don't see anything going from roof framing to floor. I was told today that I could make a ridge beam as long as I want by splicing it as long as it meets the engineer requirements.
But there is a limit to how long those three beams can be. The longer you make them the bigger they get with everything down to include the footing size. For beam size the opinion of the engineer that you are paying is the only opinion that counts. Doesn't matter what you come up with the city will ask for a stamped engineers report on it.
 

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Can you explain this a little bit? Do you mean the dimensions of the wood has to be bigger? I don't know what footing you are referring to.
The foundation of the building is sitting on a wider footing to spread the load into the ground, when you have a post holding up a beam, we call that a point load and that point will need a bigger footing to spread a bigger weight. That size is figured out by a geo tech engineer hoe inspects the dirt under the building. The length of the beam is the span between point loads.
The longer the beam the more of the weight of the roof it will carry so a bigger and bigger beam is needed I have installed beams that are as much as 19" high and 7" wide. But it all depends on length and weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Can you explain this a little bit? Do you mean the dimensions of the wood has to be bigger? I don't know what footing you are referring to.
The foundation of the building is sitting on a wider footing to spread the load into the ground, when you have a post holding up a beam, we call that a point load and that point will need a bigger footing to spread a bigger weight. That size is figured out by a geo tech engineer hoe inspects the dirt under the building. The length of the beam is the span between point loads.
The longer the beam the more of the weight of the roof it will carry so a bigger and bigger beam is needed I have installed beams that are as much as 19" high and 7" wide. But it all depends on length and weight.
The walls are concrete block. Does that change anything?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
The walls are concrete block. Does that change anything?
Not a bit....I have seen footing put under existing footings to take the new load being added.
The only definition of footing that I know is the extra concrete that is poured beneath the foundation to support the walls. Is that what you mean? Wouldn't roof weight be taken into account when the concrete footings are planned?
 

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retired framer
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The only definition of footing that I know is the extra concrete that is poured beneath the foundation to support the walls. Is that what you mean? Wouldn't roof weight be taken into account when the concrete footings are planned?
Yes, so all your decision about the roof have to be done before the footings are poured
 

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Discussion Starter #30
The only definition of footing that I know is the extra concrete that is poured beneath the foundation to support the walls. Is that what you mean? Wouldn't roof weight be taken into account when the concrete footings are planned?
Yes, so all your decision about the roof have to be done before the footings are poured
Ok. And you're saying the footings will have to be stronger if I use conventional framing instead of trusses? (Especially if I do cathedral with no ceiling joists).
 

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Ok. And you're saying the footings will have to be stronger if I use conventional framing instead of trusses? (Especially if I do cathedral with no ceiling joists).
Yes that is what I am saying. but mostly just bigger directly under the post or framing under the beam.
 

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The point loads from the ridge beam using conventional rafter framing would need footings. I'd love to see the plans of a 60' spliced ridge beam. Did you mean beam is spliced with columns to support at splices? You'd need at least 2 interior columns to support a 60' ridge beam.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
The point loads from the ridge beam using conventional rafter framing would need footings. I'd love to see the plans of a 60' spliced ridge beam. Did you mean beam is spliced with columns to support at splices? You'd need at least 2 interior columns to support a 60' ridge beam.
He was telling me just splice it by "sistering" with carriage bolts.
 

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He was telling me just splice it by "sistering" with carriage bolts.
A ridge beam? I think you should go to a truss manufacturer and never look back.

I'm confused at this thread because usually if someone wants vaulted ceilings, they really want it. If you want a vaulted ceiling, use trusses. If you don't mind a ceiling, then build the roof like normal. Rafters up to a ridge board, ceiling joists at each rafter to hold your roof together.

What are you putting inside of this 60'x47' structure where normal framing is problematic?
 

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Discussion Starter #37
He was telling me just splice it by "sistering" with carriage bolts.
A ridge beam? I think you should go to a truss manufacturer and never look back.

I'm confused at this thread because usually if someone wants vaulted ceilings, they really want it. If you want a vaulted ceiling, use trusses. If you don't mind a ceiling, then build the roof like normal. Rafters up to a ridge board, ceiling joists at each rafter to hold your roof together.

What are you putting inside of this 60'x47' structure where normal framing is problematic?
I have nothing against ceilings.

It's just a house. But I'd like to avoid having any load-bearing walls on the interior so I can get the roof done quickly and not have to frame the whole interior at the same time.
 

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I have nothing against ceilings.

It's just a house. But I'd like to avoid having any load-bearing walls on the interior so I can get the roof done quickly and not have to frame the whole interior at the same time.
My house is small, really small actually. But I did, and am still in the middle of doing, exactly what you're talking about here.

I was also going to use a ridge beam and rafters, including some collar ties near the top, worked out the math, the LVL beam I needed, priced the materials...

Then Nealtw recommended scissor trusses and it was the best advice I've taken thus far. Priced out better than doing the whole beam and rafter scheme, and they went up quick and fairly easy, all things considered. My wife and I, alone, did them in 3 working days. Add in another day for bracing.

So now I have open cathedral ceilings, and I had no interior walls up whatsoever. I just built my first interior wall this last weekend, under my fully completed roof. If you look at my house from the outside, you'd think it's finished.
 
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