DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy, its been a while since I posted in the forum. :)

My question is pretty straightforward and is told in this thread's title. The reason of such is I'm about to phase out my former trusty refrigerator as it has reached its lifespan already (more than 15 years). However before doing so I'd like to know if there is a way to tell if there is a leaking in the refrigeration gas?. I do not have a gas sensor neither I do know a way to see if there is any leaking at all.

I've seen the bottom of my fridge and there is a compressor and the tubbing although a bit dirty with some dust looks fine and there doesn't seem sign of corrosion other than what I believe is patina perhaps?. When I used the fridge I couldn't tell any weird smell or anything and the upper compartment where it houses colder beverages and chill ice does its job fine as well the cooling bottom compartment which is for fruits and vegetables.

But since I'm to phase out this fridge I'm cautious as I do not want to risk that there could be any leaking of the refrigeration gas. Not sure what kind of it was used. It's an older Samsung fridge from 1995. Thus, generally speaking does it exist a way to tell? similar to when you know there is a leak on a gas stove?. I'd like somebody with more knowledge than me, perhaps servicing appliances could tell me what to look for and what to take consideration when disposing older refrigerators or selling them. So please try to explain as much any answers as I'm a bit slow at catching up when it comes to these appliances. Thanks in advance. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
If it is cooling and freezing normally, why do you think there is a leak? Not an expert, but I would think if there was a leak, it would not be functioning properly.

Also, I had a refrigerator for 33 years, and it still functioned fine when I gave it away to a friend who needed on for his garage. Unless you are getting rid of it for esthetic reasons, it may have lots of life left.

Sent from my SM-G530T using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If it is cooling and freezing normally, why do you think there is a leak? Not an expert, but I would think if there was a leak, it would not be functioning properly.

Also, I had a refrigerator for 33 years, and it still functioned fine when I gave it away to a friend who needed on for his garage. Unless you are getting rid of it for esthetic reasons, it may have lots of life left.

Sent from my SM-G530T using Tapatalk
I'm not specifically blaming the appliance for a leak what I intended to ask is how do I know if there is a gas leak? without using any equipment i.e gas sensor or any other thing. Typically you can tell there is a leak in a kitchen stove due propane gas "has some smell" added so anyone can notice it. Thus my question was along that line.

However the refrigerant gas used in a refrigerator is different, back in the day Freon was used. Doing more google search I've found that currently Tetrafluoroethane is used and I noticed other brands going in with cyclopentane. Leaving those considerations my other concern is safety, are those gases toxic? can it poison food or anything?. In other words, maybe those do not smell and the leak can be so little to make it noticeable, but would still the fridge cool?. Even so, does this leaking happening inner the unit can poison the food?. I added these new questions hoping somebody could tell me if this can happen and may had experience with this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
To find very small leaks you can have the system recharged with a dye included with the refrigerant. (Florescent orange is best)

After a couple of weeks or months.....just start looking around, it will be apparent where the leak is located. Used this method on a very expensive SubZero and it worked perfectly. Saved $10k.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,164 Posts
A fridge doesn't have enough refrigerant to cause any harm even if it all leaks out suddenly.

The greatest problem with refrigerant is that it's heavy and displaces oxygen so if you inhale directly or a large amount is vented into a confined space, it can suffocate you.

There may be some long term health effects associated with exposure but you would have to be exposed to quite a bit every day.

Leaks in fridges should become noticeable - when you have an appliance with a pound or less, it doesn't take much leakage before you notice a loss of capacity.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top