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Discussion Starter #1
I had to replace plumbing in my shower wall and now need to close it back up. The wall is 4" x 4" ceramic tile in mortar / chicken wire over greenboard. The shower was probably tiled in the late 50s.

My plan is to fur-out a nailing point from two studs, and place Hardibacker at the correct plane to set the new tiles plumb and square with the old.

First, does the above rub anyone wrong, and if so what do you suggest instead?

Second, how do you recommend that I waterproof this repair?

Third, how do I go about getting the new tiles set exactly inline with the plane of the existing tiles???

Thanks in advance for your help!
 

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Tileguy
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My plan is to fur-out a nailing point from two studs, and place Hardibacker at the correct plane to set the new tiles plumb and square with the old.
First, does the above rub anyone wrong, and if so what do you suggest instead?
That can work. Be advised that Hardibacker is in reality 7/16" thick even tho it is referred to as 1/2", which it is not.

Second, how do you recommend that I waterproof this repair?
Hopefully the removed tile edges aren't flush with the removed substrate material. I would suggest using a liquid waterproofing product to close and top-coat the junctures after caulking. Redgard is available at Home Depot.

Third, how do I go about getting the new tiles set exactly inline with the plane of the existing tiles???
By making sure your new substrate is exactly where it needs to be. Allow for the tile mortar thickness in locating the Hardi surface.

You should also be made aware that if you have to buy new tiles for the repair that tiles of that vintage usually came 4-1/4" X 4-1/4" and also 4-3/8" X 4-3/8" depending on the manufacturer. Be precise in determing which were used originally. They were all known as 4-1/4" tiles.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Bud, for your very helpful reply.

How much thickness should I allow for the thinset, or would you (or anyone) recommend a different adhesive for this task, like mastic, etc?

A.y tips on how to get that substrate to exactly the right amount of recess from the tile plane?
 

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Tileguy
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How much thickness should I allow for the thinset, or would you (or anyone) recommend a different adhesive for this task, like mastic, etc?
Today's mastic's aren't really good in shower applications. They are known to re-emulsify.

Thinset is what I would use and I would bring-up the new substrate a little short of the old cement substrate surface. This way the thinset can be used to bring the tile forward to match the old surface. The thinset may account for about 1/16". You could butter each tile in this case and place them one at a time. Then press them into the thinset using a straightedge that crosses over the surface of the old tiles. If you get some squish/purge between the tiles don't worry about it right away. After all the tiles are in place use a wet sponge to clean the squish without pressing the tiles too hard. A pocket knife or toothbrush can also be used to help clean the grout joints of any squish/purge.

It's not as difficult as it sounds.:)
 
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