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I've been in a merciless battle trying to finish some drywall in my home. I had to cut out some old water damaged drywall and install new stuff. I used paper tape on my drywall. I started with a generous amount of mud but now realize that I likely squeezed too much out when embedding the tape. I got a few areas that were blistered. I cut them out and re-applied blue-lid USG joint compound. After sanding and having what appeared to be a decent finish I primed and was hoping I'd be ready for a top coat. To my horror some new blistering showed up. This was only after applying the primer.

So now I'm wondering what I need to do now? Do I go back and cut the blisters out like I did previously and then re-prime? I'm worried that even if I prime I'll be able to see the new fixed area when light is bounced off of it. I planned on using a flat or eggshell finish paint to help hide some of my marginal drywall finishing work. But in the meantime how do I deal with blisters that are under primer? Thanks.
 

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I wish there was a better solution, but, alas, you are stuck with cutting them out and re-mudding them. Cut them out with a utility knife, then PRIME those spots just to ensure that there is no dust contamination, then use some quickset 20 or 45. Then you can topcoat, overfilling just a bit so that when you sand, you can sand those areas flush and they will blend in better. Prime the spots after sanding and removing dust. Flat or eggshell paint will hide them enough that they shouldn't be noticeable. That's about all you can do at this point.
 

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In the future, something that helps a lot with keeping paper tape on the wall is moistening it before pushing it into the mud. I put the mud down, then take the tape and either run it under a faucet or dunk it in a bucket of water, let it sit a minute or so wet, wipe the excess water off with a cloth, then push it into the mud and force out the mud with a sharply angled knife. The idea is that you want damp paper - no dry spots or water drops.

I've also seen folks put a thick layer of joint compound right on the paper, let that sit, then slap it up on the wall and then squeeze it flat with a knife. Does the same job of slightly dampening the paper.

You also need to account for dry air in winter in some places. Up where I live I've actually run a damp sponge onto the wall before applying the mud and have also dampened the paper. Mixing the joint compound with a little more water might also help. Thin layers of joint compound dry quickly, and if you don't get the paper up on it before it dries it won't adhere. Carefully dabbing a wet sponge on the tape right after you apply it can sometimes fix places where it doesn't stick.
 

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Never would have pre primed either. Mud sticks to mud or you would need to prime between each layer of mud.
True, Toolseeker, but in this case it's possible some kind of contaminant is causing the tape to bubble......maybe not, but the primer at least gives the new mud a sound surface to stick to.......more of an insurance policy than anything else.
 
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