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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to put down tile in this area but I want to fix the squeaks first, if possible. I will be putting down plywood over top using PL400 and a few screws.
I think that it is the tongue and groove that are squeaking as I have tried putting in screws through the planks into the beams on each end of a plank. There is no access below as this is a closed in ceiling areas below.
I have attached a photo of the floor to help.
Is there a way to fix this? Will putting the subfloor with PL400 help? What do you suggest? Thanks.
 

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Predrill and screws into every joist below. I just used drywall screws. Even then you may walk over squeak or two after the finish. Can't be helped with using old construction.
Search and check about underlayment over the old subfloor. I keep forgetting, maybe don't want to remember.:smile: There was some discussion about using construction glue between such layers.
 

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Are the squeaks when you step on the joists or between them, you can see the ails where the joists are.

If it is only between the joists a new thick subfloor would not bend down between the floor. eliminating those squeaks.

With years of expansion and shrinkage you can get nails not as tight as they should be, a screw or an angled nail should fix that.

Drag a 4 foot level over the floor and look for lumps and bumps to be dealt with before you install new plywood.



We did a lot of work with engineers and we have had it all about glue.
We have had one say it is is never needed, and another gave us a pattern for the glue in a tube, another wanted a white glue in a 5 gallon pail you put down with a paint roller and one time we put down mastic like you would use for lino. They all talked like they read the book, to bad they never read the same book.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The squeaks are from between the joists. Unfortunately, this is an area that will have a tile inlay next to hardwood and is at the top of a stairway landing. So, having too thick a plywood subfloor over top makes the inlay not much of an inlay and a bit of a tripping hazard.
I did read in another posting about predrilling through the new subfloor, between the studs with short deck screws. This way the boards below pull up to the plywood above. I do like this method/idea.
 

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The squeaks are from between the joists. Unfortunately, this is an area that will have a tile inlay next to hardwood and is at the top of a stairway landing. So, having too thick a plywood subfloor over top makes the inlay not much of an inlay and a bit of a tripping hazard.
I did read in another posting about predrilling through the new subfloor, between the studs with short deck screws. This way the boards below pull up to the plywood above. I do like this method/idea.
That's a lot of screws into 1x4s and keep in mind it is nails and screws the miss the target are good squeakers too as they rub against the wood.
 

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This is my floor of 1920 house. T&G subfloor and oak strip finish. I put screws through the oak strip into the joists as well as through oak strips in the field. If you fasten those boards you can screw cement board directly on top and, as long as joists are properly distanced and load bearing enough, you can tile.
Past forum discussions would recommend: half inch plywood on subfloor. I think no glue and screw together every 6" or so. underlayment not into the joist. Then thin durock and tile. Durock may be replaced with schluter floor system. This is from memory so look for forum discussions, check and confirm. Search key word may be "tile over plywood floor" or such.
This was not for tile. Just for squeaks. Shimming to level and staple engineered hard wood floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I want to thank everyone for all your advice and suggestions.

I think I am going to hire someone for this part of my renovations. I am and will continue to be too worried about cracking if I try to deal with this myself. Sometimes letting a pro do things for you is just worth it.

I hope everyone is doing well and keeping healthy.
Cheers
 

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I've seen installers use SQUARE head screws to install a subfloor. Do you guys have a preference for the type of screw head? Why not just Phillips head screws? For 3/4" T&G OSB subfloor, screwing into 2x8 joists, what size screw?

Thanks in advance.
 

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It squeaks between the joists. There is NO access from underneath.
These photos show the size of the planks and distance between studs.
The best option then would be remove the flooring and put down 3/4" T&G plywood.

My opinion
The floor thickness should be at least 1 1/4" thick. I like to go to 1 1/2" thick because people now-a-days are just fatter.
 

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To add an answer to toddlimelight's question, phillips heads require some pressure to keep them seated while driving, far more than the square or Torx (AKA 6-lobe, star drive, etc.). I find the phillips are ok for shorter screws (up to 2"), but tend to slip and strip badly for anything longer.
 

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Based on what you said about having to pre-drill, I was taught that pre-drilling is almost always preferred (but not always possible), because of the screw displacing wood in a joist or stud and causing the wood to split.

Also, very interesting about using the square head screw for better gripping from the drill bit and less slippage.

So, I think it's settled: I'll use 1 3/4" square head screws to fasten 3/4" OSB T&G to the joists.

I'll put down glue first to the joists.

Thanks guys.
 
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