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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am prepping to paint my house. The previous paint job wasn't that long ago, but the work was kind of sloppy. There are several localized areas where the paint is chipping or bubbling. Obviously I will need to strip, sand, and prime these areas. However, there are also lots of areas that look perfectly fine, but the paint can easily be stripped away in large, rubbery sheets, with just a simple scraper and no chemical or heat treatment whatsoever, leaving the primer underneath intact. I am concerned that this is indicative of the paint not having bonded properly to the primer (which has a very slick, smooth texture), and that if I do not strip this paint away and simply paint over the top of it, the new coat won't last as long. But I'd like to know if that is really the case before I undertake all the work, or if that is possibly just normal behavior that I don't need to worry about.
 

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Post some picture of the bad areas.
Could be lots of things.
No one bothered to pressure wash before painting.
Painting to early or to late in the day so moisture was an issue.
Someone tryed painting over gloss paint without sanding.
No bonding primer.
Cheap paint.
Painting in direct sun during the heat of the day.
Painting over rotten moisture filled wood.
 

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jschaben
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I am prepping to paint my house. The previous paint job wasn't that long ago, but the work was kind of sloppy. There are several localized areas where the paint is chipping or bubbling. Obviously I will need to strip, sand, and prime these areas. However, there are also lots of areas that look perfectly fine, but the paint can easily be stripped away in large, rubbery sheets, with just a simple scraper and no chemical or heat treatment whatsoever, leaving the primer underneath intact. I am concerned that this is indicative of the paint not having bonded properly to the primer (which has a very slick, smooth texture), and that if I do not strip this paint away and simply paint over the top of it, the new coat won't last as long. But I'd like to know if that is really the case before I undertake all the work, or if that is possibly just normal behavior that I don't need to worry about.
I agree that a pic would be helpful. To get to your main question though, if the paint that is on there is easily stripped away, you will need to remove it. Painting over it wont glue it back down, you'll just end up with two coats that are easily stripped off. Hard to tell what the initial problem is. Are you sure that is primer or a top coat that it is stripping down to. If a topcoat, it could be a chalking type and the chalk not removed. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses. I don't have access to a camera unfortunately, but basically all you'd see if I had one is a very smooth, kind of burnished layer of primer, except for a handful of spots where the paint seems to be much more effectively bonded to it and wouldn't strip away. However, it was pretty hot outside yesterday when I was experimenting with this (almost 100). Now it is only about 60, and the paint seems much more reluctant to strip away. Perhaps it was just a function of the heat? It almost never gets that hot here, so if that's the case it may not be a problem after all. I've also noticed that the paint is more difficult to strip on a back wall which does not receive any direct sunlight.
 
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