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Discussion Starter #1
So... I have 15-30 volts on ground on all outlets through the house and also on the dryer receptacle. This is with me sticking one probe into ground and using me as the other "ground". 10-2 is run to the dryer receptacle and is obviously on it's own dual 30-amp breaker. There is something to note in that most 20 amp circuits show 30 volts, but the dryer ground shows 16 volts.

All of my ground wires in the panel show 1.6 volts when I touch one side of the lead to them and use myself as the other ground.

It would seem to me that since all of my outlets have voltage to ground, that the "leaking" voltage is coming from the service wire into the house or else something close to the breaker panel, but then shouldn't I see higher voltage right at the breaker panel? Shouldn't it be at least the same (15-30 volts) as the other outlets?

Don't want to have to dig up the service conductors if I can figure out some other direction to check first. Also, is there a way I could check the service conductors to make sure they are the culprit?

Thank you!
 

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So... I have 15-30 volts on ground on all outlets through the house and also on the dryer receptacle. This is with me sticking one probe into ground and using me as the other "ground". 10-2 is run to the dryer receptacle and is obviously on it's own dual 30-amp breaker. There is something to note in that most 20 amp circuits show 30 volts, but the dryer ground shows 16 volts.

All of my ground wires in the panel show 1.6 volts when I touch one side of the lead to them and use myself as the other ground.

It would seem to me that since all of my outlets have voltage to ground, that the "leaking" voltage is coming from the service wire into the house or else something close to the breaker panel, but then shouldn't I see higher voltage right at the breaker panel? Shouldn't it be at least the same (15-30 volts) as the other outlets?

Don't want to have to dig up the service conductors if I can figure out some other direction to check first. Also, is there a way I could check the service conductors to make sure they are the culprit?

Thank you!
I never used myself as a ground so I have nothing to compare to.

Put an ammeter on your grounding conductor at the water pipe to see if any current is flowing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You mean an ohm meter? Sorry, not too savvy in all the ways a multimeter can be used and want to make sure...

My ground runs to a grounding rod, and I am getting 0 volts on my grounding wire when I disconnect it from the breaker panel, also, when I do that all of the grounds on the panel jump to 6 volts. Didn't check to see what the outlets jumped to. So I assume the ground is helping to channel out some of the voltage?

Funny thing is that everything in the house works just fine. I only discovered this problem after buying a new super/high/ultra/energy efficient dryer and it won't work, just gives a Power Failure code. Traced it back to this as the most likely culprit.

Thanks again
 

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You mean an ohm meter? Sorry, not too savvy in all the ways a multimeter can be used and want to make sure...

My ground runs to a grounding rod, and I am getting 0 volts on my grounding wire when I disconnect it from the breaker panel, also, when I do that all of the grounds on the panel jump to 6 volts. Didn't check to see what the outlets jumped to. So I assume the ground is helping to channel out some of the voltage?

Funny thing is that everything in the house works just fine. I only discovered this problem after buying a new super/high/ultra/energy efficient dryer and it won't work, just gives a Power Failure code. Traced it back to this as the most likely culprit.

Thanks again
An ammeter measures current. An ohmmeter measures resistance.

Call the dryer factory about your error code.
 

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Ammeter is an amp meter. It measures amperage or current.

Why do you think you are a valid ground reference ? Even sticking one probe into the earth (particularly dry dirt, doesn't give you a valid ground reference.

Besides having an invalid ground reference, I would lay odds on your using a digital volt meter, not an analog meter.
 

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So... I have 15-30 volts on ground on all outlets through the house and also on the dryer receptacle. This is with me sticking one probe into ground and using me as the other "ground". 10-2 is run to the dryer receptacle and is obviously on it's own dual 30-amp breaker. There is something to note in that most 20 amp circuits show 30 volts, but the dryer ground shows 16 volts.

All of my ground wires in the panel show 1.6 volts when I touch one side of the lead to them and use myself as the other ground.

It would seem to me that since all of my outlets have voltage to ground, that the "leaking" voltage is coming from the service wire into the house or else something close to the breaker panel, but then shouldn't I see higher voltage right at the breaker panel? Shouldn't it be at least the same (15-30 volts) as the other outlets?

Don't want to have to dig up the service conductors if I can figure out some other direction to check first. Also, is there a way I could check the service conductors to make sure they are the culprit?

Thank you!

WORTHLESS TEST, that means nothing to no one.

Check and see if the neutral is grounded/bonded in the panel

Check voltage between Neutral and ground, with all loads on you should have voltage maybe .5-2 VAC, turn off all loads do the same test you should have 0 volts.

Check voltage, neutral to hot, check voltage hot to ground, ar the reading sensible/realistic?

This assumes you are using a good quality meter that is impedance protected otherwise you may read anything due to "phantom Voltage" a byproduct of meter design.

If you can get an amp clamp you can measure current as noted.

Don't dig anything up.
 

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I am certainly not an expert, but couldnt this be explained by a "jumped neutral". To explain, i have seen two wire houses use 3 prong receptacles, and, to pass the inspection the "electrician" hooks a piece of wire between the ground screw of the receptacle and the neutral wire. It "fools" those plug in testers with the 3 lights.

I believe that would send current over your ground wire, and might explain the voltage you are reading.

Sent from my LG-D415 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The local repair shop has replaced everything on the dryer over a 2 month period. It was brand new to begin with and they have given up.

I will google using the ammeter setup on the multimeter and connect to the ground rod.

Thanks
 

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The local repair shop has replaced everything on the dryer over a 2 month period. It was brand new to begin with and they have given up.

I will google using the ammeter setup on the multimeter and connect to the ground rod.

Thanks
Another WORTHLESS TEST.

A ground rod has little to NOTHING to do with the operating voltage in your house.


Ground rods are for minimizing the damage from lightning and accidental connection to the utility primary voltage (high voltage)
 

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Did the dryer ever work? What voltage do you have at the receptacle ?
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
So neutral is not bonded to the panel even though this is the main panel. I have .5-.6 volts with one lead on neutral and it drops down .1 of a volt when touching both neutral and ground. so the voltage doesn't change when touching both neutral and ground and shutting the power off, but if I'm just touching neutral with one lead it drops down to .04 volts when power is shut off.

I'm using a Bosch Fix 7677.

The Dryer has 242 volts with both positives and 121 on both sides touching one lead to ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The reason I was using myself as ground, though I'd never heard of it before, was because an electrician told me that's what he does...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The dryer works, in that it turns on and you can set different settings, but as soon as you tell it to start, with whatever setting you have selected, it turns itself off and comes back on with a PF code flashing. They replaced the thermistor, board, motor, etc. Everything Whirlpool told them to and came to the conclusion it has to be a power issue even though it's wired correctly. So I started digging around and that's when an electrician said to use myself as a ground to check for voltage at ground because the new dryers are sensitive.

Whirlpool wed75hefw is the model.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
They said that voltage from cattle fences or well-pumps could come in through the ground, which we have both here.
 

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I am certainly not an expert, but couldnt this be explained by a "jumped neutral". To explain, i have seen two wire houses use 3 prong receptacles, and, to pass the inspection the "electrician" hooks a piece of wire between the ground screw of the receptacle and the neutral wire. It "fools" those plug in testers with the 3 lights.

I believe that would send current over your ground wire, and might explain the voltage you are reading.

Sent from my LG-D415 using Tapatalk
Jeff you may have nailed it. A bootleg ground could be the root cause of the OP's problem. I found that a few years ago in a multi-family condo building. One of the owners got a new furnace and it would not work properly. The HVAC tech found 30 volts on the neutral to ground connection. The ground to water pipe also had 30 volts. The problem turned out to be in an outside house sub-panel where the original installer used the bare grounding conductor that fed off of the ground buss in the main, as a neutral and a ground. Separating them eliminated the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So, if I'm doing it incorrectly by touching one lead to ground and the other to me, how do you check for voltage at ground?
 
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