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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to put in electric radiant floor heat mat in my bath remodel under the tile. How do you connect it to the electricty w/o tearing up the walls to access the electric supply?
 

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I want to put in electric radiant floor heat mat in my bath remodel under the tile. How do you connect it to the electricty w/o tearing up the walls to access the electric supply?
First you would have to determine the electric load the floor requires. I would recommend that the heating be put on it's own circuit, so in any case you would need to run a new line from the main panel to the bathroom. On the slim chance the instructions don't say that, you will still probably need to open some walls to get the wire where it needs to go.
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. well i was afraid that would be the case. we can do it, no problem, i just dislike doing drywall repair! oh well.
 

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Thanks. well i was afraid that would be the case. we can do it, no problem, i just dislike doing drywall repair! oh well.
The more you do, the better you get. Eventually you'll open walls like you open a door.
Ron
 

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I recently put radiant electric heat in my kitchen. The post regarding the new circuit is right on the money, you do not want to share the floor heat with anything else. You will also need a ground fault interrupt (GFI) for the circuit, you can either install a GFI circuit breaker, or in some cases (as in mine) the GFI is built into the thermostat that controls the floor heat. In any case, plan on opening up the wall both to run the new circuit and to install the thermostat.
 

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A low voltage system will not need a GFCI but will have a small transformer you'll need to place somewhere.

The best features about low voltage is that it comes with a 25 year element warranty, it can be cut and jumped up to the seat in a shower or the actual floor of the shower itself and then back out to the bathroom floor. In the worst case scenerio, if the element is ever damaged, it is easily repaired.
 

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Is basement below? Or crawl? Then you only need thermo. hole on wall. Other heat source is required, if inspected. Be sure to use the nick alarm when installing over it. File the sharp corners of your thin set trowel rounded. Be safe, G
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i actually have 2 baths i want to add this floor heat to. The one is in a basement and would go over a concrete floor. the other is a main floor bath but the basement ceiling is finished. i'm looking at a bunch of wiring either way. I am intrigued by the low voltage heaters described by warmsme. I'll have to research this further. Anyone else have info on it?
 
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