DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just browsing around the store and they grabbed my attention. They have some tomorrow for fixing drywall and there are some ones of electrical and tiling coming up. Has anyone gone to these, are they any good?
 

·
Remodeling Contractor
Joined
·
3,590 Posts
Any class will offer some knowledge which is always good. If not sure of something they say it would be good to learn more about it here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,743 Posts
It probably depends on the level of knowledge of the employee teaching the class. And, they are only given a set amount of time, so who knows if they're able to give you very thorough instructions.

As far as the electrical class goes, I would love to learn how to fix electrical problems around my house. But....taking a 30-60 minute class at Home Depot would, IMO, give me just enough knowledge and confidence to get myself killed. That's just my .02 cents worth.
 

·
Drywall contractor
Joined
·
2,151 Posts
It can't hurt, and I'm sure you can learn some basics. Just don't take their instruction for "gospel". When in doubt, come back to this site....
 

·
Tired, Cold, and Damp
Joined
·
3,089 Posts
Definitely check them out
Most presenters are at least well prepped if not actually experienced (but some are experienced), and the actual visuals of seeing it live and responses to real-time questions, and sometimes hands-on time...the actual interaction...can be very, very, helpful compared to a video or book

Worth the cost (usually just some time) if not more, given the caveats presented in this and the previous responses
Possibly worth much more if you get a good presenter and you respond more to this type of thing than a video or book instructions
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,248 Posts
One thing the tiling did not touch on was waterproofing for a shower/tub area. But that would be a little more advanced I guess
 

·
Remodeling Contractor
Joined
·
3,590 Posts
It probably depends on the level of knowledge of the employee teaching the class. And, they are only given a set amount of time, so who knows if they're able to give you very thorough instructions.

As far as the electrical class goes, I would love to learn how to fix electrical problems around my house. But....taking a 30-60 minute class at Home Depot would, IMO, give me just enough knowledge and confidence to get myself killed. That's just my .02 cents worth.
You are right on with this electrical troubleshooting comment. But it is more the fact that this subject demands a lot of experience in different was electrical and the building are constructed to visualize where the electrical problem can be resolved. No class can cover this in a short time. But sites likes this can help, since we narrow down the problem to one issue at a time.
 

·
Remodeling Contractor
Joined
·
3,590 Posts
One thing the tiling did not touch on was waterproofing for a shower/tub area. But that would be a little more advanced I guess
This is what my post was about. It is a good start and then post here for more details and verification on any issues you are not sure off. Also HD will only cover the basic installation and not offer any higher end installation methods or materials.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I can see that the answer is "it depends on the instructor".
From personal experience another factor is the format of the class.

I went to part of a drywall class (I was in the store and saw the
class so I stood and listened-watched).
The instructor had a set up there to demonstrate what he was
talking about. It was awesome and really instructive. For DIY,
there is nothing like seeing it done at least once.

I signed up for a deck class to prep for building my deck.
That one was crappy. There was no demo - it was purely lecture
by 2 kids filling in for the instructor who was sick. Some kids really
know their stuff, but these were just starting out.
Nice guys but not experienced. During the talk they showed things
from a shopping cart. It was memorable to me when they pulled
out one of those shadowtrack-like things and didn't know what
it was for or how to use it.

Since I am a DIY newbie, I will take advantage of more Home Depot
seminars in the future (and Lowes when they start having them in Canada). However, I will ask ahead of time if there is a demo or not.
I'll probably avoid the non-demo seminars - you get more watching
HGTV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,743 Posts
Luckily, if you have done some diy at home and also spent some time on this forum, you probably have an idea of how something should be done. At least maybe enough to know when something they're teaching doesn't seem right.

You're right, it does depend on the instructor.

Imagine being those poor kids and your boss tells you that you're giving a demonstration on something you really don't know much about. Yikes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I went to the one on patching drywall last Sunday. I was the only one who came for the class so I had one on one instruction. The instructor did the demo based on what I told him I needed, and then I was able to ask a lot of questions. Was very helpful for me! :)
 

·
Remodeling Contractor
Joined
·
3,590 Posts
I can see that the answer is "it depends on the instructor".
From personal experience another factor is the format of the class.

I went to part of a drywall class (I was in the store and saw the
class so I stood and listened-watched).
The instructor had a set up there to demonstrate what he was
talking about. It was awesome and really instructive. For DIY,
there is nothing like seeing it done at least once.

I signed up for a deck class to prep for building my deck.
That one was crappy. There was no demo - it was purely lecture
by 2 kids filling in for the instructor who was sick. Some kids really
know their stuff, but these were just starting out.
Nice guys but not experienced. During the talk they showed things
from a shopping cart. It was memorable to me when they pulled
out one of those shadowtrack-like things and didn't know what
it was for or how to use it.

Since I am a DIY newbie, I will take advantage of more Home Depot
seminars in the future (and Lowes when they start having them in Canada). However, I will ask ahead of time if there is a demo or not.
I'll probably avoid the non-demo seminars - you get more watching
HGTV.
Be careful trying to only learn by DIY and HGTV shows. These are for entertainment and rarely if ever are jobs done correctly.
 

·
Newbie Bill
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
Check out your local college or technical institution too.

I know there are basement finishing courses offered through our technical college taught by the instructors in the apprenticeship programs. They even select one basement and a large part of the course is actual hands on work in that basement.

I'll sign up for that one when I get ready to finish my basement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I was building a bathroom in the basement and had to do the mudding. Went to a workshop at Home Depot, came home and did a "perfect" job..... even the person who taught the course at Home Depot, who is a neighbour, thought it was perfect. Of course, the sanding is so important. So if you pay attention, you can pick up a lot of good pointers. I also went to the tiling workshop, and then tiled the bathroom floor. Next week I am tiling the splashguard in my kitchen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
My son and I signed up for the Drywall workshop at the Home Depot in Granbury, TX. We went this morning and I cannot tell you how disappointed I was. First, we couldn't find where in the building the workshop was being done. Employees kept sending us to different places, all to no avail. When we were finally led to the man that was in charge of the workshop he asked us what we were wanting to do. I told him that we had a hole in a wall and we were wanting to learn how to fix it. He walked us back across the store (this was our third time to walk across the store) and took us to a shopping cart with some items in it. He proceeded to quickly tell us how to repair the hole as he picked up various items out of the cart. Then he told us what we needed to go and purchase. This all took under 5 minutes. I asked him if this was the workshop and he told me yes. I told him I understood this to be a hands-on type of workshop. He asked me if I really needed him to show me something. I told him that was exactly what I thought the workshop was for, to show us how to do it. He said, "No. This was the workshop."
I hope that this was not ordinarily how they truly do their workshops because, quite frankly, that was an extreme waste of my time.
My son lost his balance and fell into a wall and put a hole in it. We found this class offered at Home Depot and signed up for it. We had been looking forward to this class for a month. It was a Mother's Day gift for me from my son. Something for us to do together. My husband, my son's father, died 6 months ago and we are at a loss with things like this. My husband did remodeling for 35 years and was so very good at it. This was going to be part of our healing process. Needless to say, we were extremely disappointed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,595 Posts
My son and I signed up for the Drywall workshop at the Home Depot in Granbury, TX. We went this morning and I cannot tell you how disappointed I was. First, we couldn't find where in the building the workshop was being done. Employees kept sending us to different places, all to no avail. When we were finally led to the man that was in charge of the workshop he asked us what we were wanting to do. I told him that we had a hole in a wall and we were wanting to learn how to fix it. He walked us back across the store (this was our third time to walk across the store) and took us to a shopping cart with some items in it. He proceeded to quickly tell us how to repair the hole as he picked up various items out of the cart. Then he told us what we needed to go and purchase. This all took under 5 minutes. I asked him if this was the workshop and he told me yes. I told him I understood this to be a hands-on type of workshop. He asked me if I really needed him to show me something. I told him that was exactly what I thought the workshop was for, to show us how to do it. He said, "No. This was the workshop."
I hope that this was not ordinarily how they truly do their workshops because, quite frankly, that was an extreme waste of my time.
My son lost his balance and fell into a wall and put a hole in it. We found this class offered at Home Depot and signed up for it. We had been looking forward to this class for a month. It was a Mother's Day gift for me from my son. Something for us to do together. My husband, my son's father, died 6 months ago and we are at a loss with things like this. My husband did remodeling for 35 years and was so very good at it. This was going to be part of our healing process. Needless to say, we were extremely disappointed.
This explains rather well how things have changed in the past 8 long years. You're probably fortunate your car wasn't stolen while in the store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,046 Posts
There are lots of people looking for inexpensive activities to do with the kids, so the kids' workshops work well. I go all the time with my son. They have free orange aprons and participation pins and all the supplies. At one Home Depot, they even have a popcorn machine and cookies and juices. It is a lot of fun.

I think it's harder to get adults excited about a free workshop at the Home Depot. They don't do anything to get people excited about them. They just scribble it on a dry erase board by the store entrance. And if people aren't showing up, nobody is going to put in much effort.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top