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I am painting my mother-in-laws interior and she wanted all the existing nail/screw holes filled in. I filled them in with joint compound and then sanded with a sponge sander. After I finished the painting downstairs, I can notice some of the spots where I did do the fill in of the holes(even with 2 coats). What should I be doing different to not see these spots? Spot prime? Thanks-Brad
 

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I am painting my mother-in-laws interior and she wanted all the existing nail/screw holes filled in. I filled them in with joint compound and then sanded with a sponge sander. After I finished the painting downstairs, I can notice some of the spots where I did do the fill in of the holes(even with 2 coats).
Is finish color flat or a different sheen? Did you paint the whole wall or just touch up the spots with finish color? Texture of sponge sander is probably different than original finish. You would see the texture left by the sponge sander if you look at the repaired spot at an angle. Try a finer grit on your finish sand next time. Without seeing it in person, this is just my 2 cents....
 

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Is finish color flat or a different sheen? Did you paint the whole wall or just touch up the spots with finish color? Texture of sponge sander is probably different than original finish. You would see the texture left by the sponge sander if you look at the repaired spot at an angle. Try a finer grit on your finish sand next time. Without seeing it in person, this is just my 2 cents....
I painted all the walls a different color than the existing. I dont think what I am seeing is from the sanding sponge since when I sand, I sand a bigger area that where the compound is actually at. What I am seeing appears to be a residue from the joint compound. And yes it is more/less noticeable depending on your angle to it.
 

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Does the repaired area appear to be a flatter sheen than the surrounding paint? I have seen this when I am in a hurry and do not use primer on the new joint compound. I don't think the first finish coat seals the compound like a good primer and the second coat still gets absorbed into the compound. Perhaps a painting pro could explain it better, as I only know what I have experienced rehabbing my own properties. I have learned to prime all patch jobs with a slightly watered down primer. For some reason, it seems to blend better with the old surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Does the repaired area appear to be a flatter sheen than the surrounding paint? I have seen this when I am in a hurry and do not use primer on the new joint compound. I don't think the first finish coat seals the compound like a good primer and the second coat still gets absorbed into the compound. Perhaps a painting pro could explain it better, as I only know what I have experienced rehabbing my own properties. I have learned to prime all patch jobs with a slightly watered down primer. For some reason, it seems to blend better with the old surface.
That is exactly what I am describing. I will try and prime the next rooms first and see what happens. Thanks.
 

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Yup. You skipped the primer. The drywall compound is sucking the paint into your patches. I few more coats of finish should help the situation.

Next time grasshopper?

When you can pluck this magic formula from my hand you may become a Shao Lin painter:

1. Nice primer
2. Two coats of finish
 

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HI, I don't want to hijack this thread, but I have the same question and the last primmer reply prompted this post.

Having a similar problem on one wall. Repainting the interior of my house from soot damage. Primming with bin. The staircase wall gets direct sunlight through a skylight. I am guessing the temp changes throught the day are the cause of the 30 or so screw pops. I have filled and sanded many times. Went to wet sponge and back to 220 sand paper. Switched to a new container of joint compound, much better, but still there. After using the bin, should I spot reprime with another another product?

I have not finished this wall yet. The other walls looked different after the bin. They finished fine. Dinning room finished with BM Regal (egg shell) and the family room, kitchen used SW Super paint (satin). I am going to use BM flat on the staircase.

Joe chime in.

thanks,

bernie
 

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Hey Bernie, hows things? I think OP will benefit from any discussion of patching/priming.
Firstly, that light will be brutal for highlighting the slightest defects. Flat may not be your best choice for wear/tear, but it will be for camouflage. BIN would be an ideal primer/sealer for your situation. BIN has a sheen and it's possible that the compound will absorb some of that and you're seeing the slight flash, but that doesn't mean it will show through a finish, even a sheen. Is it just a flash or can you see a depression or raised area? I would suggest that before you go chasing something, try putting some test samples of finish on the worst of the areas to see if what you see now goes away with the flat. Paint doesn't fix things, it just hides them. You're playing tricks with light, and, if you can't see it, does it exist?
You may want to consider sinking a few drywall screws in some strategic areas. Sometimes, if the rock is not tight against the studs it will make patching impossible as the movement continually disturbs the patch. Keep us posted Bernie.
 

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Joe, thanks for the reply. I'm doing well, I think.

I did double screw the wall. Light is a critical thing, to be sure. I primmed that wall yesterday. I may re-compound the spots tomorrow, reprime the spots, and do a test finish paint. I decided to paint that wall in flat to hide as much as possible, it is a tough situation.

thanks to all,

bernie
 
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