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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I was taking down my paneling in my house and noticed there was a junction box hiding behind the panel. It's in the middle of the wall, and there are wires that go up and into the bathroom behind the wall. And then down to an outlet.

I don't know how to get rid of this so it is correctly done. There isn't enough wire to pull down so I can connect the top half to the outlet.

Is there any good ways to get rid of this? Or do I have to try and do a lot of re-wiring?
 

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Mad Scientist
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You will have to either leave the junction box accessible, with blank cover over it, or figure out where the other ends of that cable go, and run a new cable between those points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, that is what I thought. Just wanted to confirm. I think i'll have to take down the light fixture in the next room so I can add more wire.
 

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What's on the other side of the wall? If it's a garage, closet, or other less conspicuous place, you could turn the box around and leave it exposed there. Or Tyco makes a splice kit that is approved for use without a junction box. They are pretty expensive (like $6 or $7 each).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Its a bathroom and if I turn it around it would just be in the bathroom....Unless I turn it into an outlet for the bathroom...hmm thats a thought.
 

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There you go. Don't know why I didn't think of that. One can never have too any outlets. Unless, of course, the box is 6 feet above the floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm no electrician, but the junction box goes down into an outlet, I don't see why the junction box can't be turned into one. How do i tell if its 20 amp?
 

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Can't turn it into a receptacle in the bathroom unless it only serves the bathroom and is 20 amp.
Technically correct. However, this is one case where I wouldn't care what the code says. Noncompliant doesn't necessarily mean unsafe. What's next? Tell the poor guy he needs to pull a permit?
 

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You could still put a blank cover over it in the bathroom, but you can't use for a receptacle. At the very least it must be a GFCI receptacle.
 

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Wire Chewer
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I would just go ahead and turn it into a GFCI in the bathroom. There is probably already a dedicated outlet in there anyway so who cares if that particular one is not 20 amps and not dedicated? If some inspector sees it and does not like it then it could just be replaced with a blank plate, but from a safety point of view there is zero issue.

If it's at eye level, you could also just hang a picture there.
 

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Learning by Doing
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Technically correct. However, this is one case where I wouldn't care what the code says. Noncompliant doesn't necessarily mean unsafe. What's next? Tell the poor guy he needs to pull a permit?
What is important here is that people KNOW what the code allows and requires. The 'Technically correct' part is rather important. It is also important that, as a group, we APPRECIATE it when someone takes the time to remind us of the requirements of the NEC. Some of us like to do it right.

And, yes, since you brought it up, depending on his jurisdiction, the 'poor guy' may be required to pull a permit.
 

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Learning by Doing
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Actually we don't know where he lives. If he live in Canada then it is within code.
THanks for reminding us we need to include the Canadians, too. :thumbsup:

Perfect example of what I was talking about. Knowing the rules matters.
 

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Seen electrical boxes buried in all sorts of interesting places -
they should not be hidden/covered; unless, there's some kind of access.
Seen outlets in floors, ceilings - there's standard practice - then there's
expediency.

rossfingal
 

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What is important here is that people KNOW what the code allows and requires. The 'Technically correct' part is rather important. It is also important that, as a group, we APPRECIATE it when someone takes the time to remind us of the requirements of the NEC. Some of us like to do it right.

And, yes, since you brought it up, depending on his jurisdiction, the 'poor guy' may be required to pull a permit.
I don't intend to start a flamefest here. However, my issue with codes in general is that what is "right" depends on where you live and the vagaries of the inspector. I am an engineer, and two plus two always equals four no matter where I am. But with codes, it can equal four in one place and five in another. Or, it can equal four but the inspector will say in your case we're going to say it's five and pass the work.
 

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the Musigician
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Just being facetious. Having an outlet so high would certainly limit what you could plug into it.
Oic.... :laughing: I was gonna say... I have one in the boy's bedroom that's 5' up the wall. That's where I'll be building in the closet/entertainment center. No cords hanging all down the back that way when he puts the computer up there on the shelf. Outlets up and down.

DM
 

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I don't intend to start a flamefest here. However, my issue with codes in general is that what is "right" depends on where you live and the vagaries of the inspector. I am an engineer, and two plus two always equals four no matter where I am. But with codes, it can equal four in one place and five in another. Or, it can equal four but the inspector will say in your case we're going to say it's five and pass the work.
You're right about code enforcement being spotty. But, if you've adhered to the NEC or other local code then you're ok. Sure there might be a goofy inspector now and then, but citing the code tends to fix things right up.
 
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