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Our house is Cedar Clapboard. We hired a contractor to power wash, prime, put two coats of Acrylic stain on the house, as well as replace our window frames. The house was yellow. We picked a light taupe gray, but the color turned out like beige. Almost like the yellow was peeking through. We had another contractor come over to see about changing to another color, and the contractor has just informed us that he is 99% sure the first contractor did not prime our house as promised as there are already areas on the house peeling off and the house was only painted a few weeks ago. Also, the contractor pointed out that there are whole areas of the house (behind the bushes for examples) that were not primed or painted. We were to pay $8,000 for the first paint job, but now he says we would have to pay $20,000 to sand down the house, prime the house, and repaint it. I think the new contractor might be right as the color does look yellow. Not to mention that everyone else we spoke to said the first contractor should not have spray painted the house. Anyway, it looks like we're going to have to get the original money back from the first painter as we will have to redo the whole house. My question is this: how can we prove that the first painter did not prime the house before painting? Any ideas? Someone suggested taking a board to Sherwin Williams....they thought the computer which matches colors might be able to analyze all that is on the clapboard. Help! How can we prove that the guy did not use primer? I cannot believe a job that cost $8000 is now going to cost $20,000 to fix. Is there any other way to tell whether a primer was used? Is there some solution we can pour on the clapboard that would dissolve the paint but leave the primer if it was indeed applied? Thanks so much for any help!
 

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princessre said:
Our house is Cedar Clapboard. We hired a contractor to power wash, prime, put two coats of Acrylic stain on the house, as well as replace our window frames. The house was yellow. We picked a light taupe gray, but the color turned out like beige. Almost like the yellow was peeking through. We had another contractor come over to see about changing to another color, and the contractor has just informed us that he is 99% sure the first contractor did not prime our house as promised as there are already areas on the house peeling off and the house was only painted a few weeks ago. Also, the contractor pointed out that there are whole areas of the house (behind the bushes for examples) that were not primed or painted. We were to pay $8,000 for the first paint job, but now he says we would have to pay $20,000 to sand down the house, prime the house, and repaint it. I think the new contractor might be right as the color does look yellow. Not to mention that everyone else we spoke to said the first contractor should not have spray painted the house. Anyway, it looks like we're going to have to get the original money back from the first painter as we will have to redo the whole house. My question is this: how can we prove that the first painter did not prime the house before painting? Any ideas? Someone suggested taking a board to Sherwin Williams....they thought the computer which matches colors might be able to analyze all that is on the clapboard. Help! How can we prove that the guy did not use primer? I cannot believe a job that cost $8000 is now going to cost $20,000 to fix. Is there any other way to tell whether a primer was used? Is there some solution we can pour on the clapboard that would dissolve the paint but leave the primer if it was indeed applied? Thanks so much for any help!
A thought;
You could request the receipts from your contractor in question to "prove" they used (or didn't use primer. That really stinks. Best of luck!
 

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Hmmm, I'm missing something. Oh yeah! What happened to the first contractor? You jumped from hiring one contractor to talking to a second contractor to wanting to get your money back from the first one. So, again, what happened to the first contractor? Why are you talking to another contractor, let alone complete strangers on the internet, but not the company you hired in the first place? And why would you need to have the second contractor tell you that parts of your house were not painted? Do you live in your home? Do you ever walk around and look at it? Slow down a bit, actually a lot, and, unless there is something significant missing from your text here, review your contract, to see what was agreed upon, make a list of your concerns, and contact the first contractor before going any farther down a different path.
 

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I suggest keeping the lines of communication open with the original contractor as I said at the other forum, it is easy to say so and so screwed up but I can fix it for 20 stacks. Will the first contractor talk with you?
 

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$20,000 to repaint a house.........wow! I know the first contractor may have really screwed things up, but, my oh my, I've never charged $20,000 for a residential paint job.........just sayin.
 

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OP,
Was the house bare cedar prior to painting?
Was it stain or paint used? If it was stain, it wouldn't need a primer.
If the finish was sprayed, was it back brushed? (Here I go again, on my kick) If a sprayed finish over bare cedar was not back brushed, it would, for the most part, just lay on the surface, which could be a contributor to premature peeling. It could also be they didn't allow enough dry time after washing.
Forget taking wood to the paint store. Call the paint store, tell them the finish that was just applied is failing, and that you need a rep to come out to the house to determine why. They'll get to the bottom of it.
 

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now, now, work, this is a family site:laughing:
I forgot about the general audience rating.


I am interested in how the communication is with the customer and the contractor. Has the contractor come back to look at the job? If he has and feels it is a material issue he should have a rep to look at the job as well. Mistakes and mishaps happen and it is how the contractor deals with it that makes their reputation.
 

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Yep Dean is deep in the RRP laws and is a lead inspector.
Thanks guys, I knew that about Dean, and it was what I figured. It just kind of seemed like there was something about the failure. You know how they had all those problems with the Chinese drywall, something like that. Maybe it was a Chinese clapboard thingy. :laughing:
 

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Dean, this is the second query from you as to year of build on a question like this. The reasoning wasn't mentioned last time, what is the issue specific to the year it was built?
It was my indirect way of trying to find out if the contractor was an ethical contractor. If he was deceitful on RRP, he probably would be deceitful on other things. If he was, no need to discuss much with him, since you can't believe what he says.

In my opinion, if a contractor warns a homeowner and the homeowner doesn't want to do compliance ... the contractor has done their job. I personally don't have a problem with the contractor going ahead and doing the work. Of course, the EPA doesn't agree with me :)
 

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Set up a meeting with the original contractor and a paint rep. If the contractor is refusing to come back and correct the problem then he is probably a hack. If he is a hack, good luck on getting your money back. You can take him to court but it will take about two years before you can get a judgement against him and you still will not get your money. A TOOKE GAUGE is a "destructive" paint testing instrument use to observe multiple layers of paint and the substraight under microscopic observation. You can view each layer of paint for defects and measure dry film thickness of each coat.
 

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The first "contractor" was obviously a hack.

Among other things, he didn't let the house dry adequately after power-washing it - hence, the immediate peeling.

If he wasn't smart enough to NOT do that, what else was he NOT smart enough to do properly. He's also not very thorough, as he didn't even bother staining the parts of the house that are behind bushes.


As MustangMike said, you're probably going to have to pursue legal recourse - though that's going to be a nightmare as well.,


This whole scenario just sucks.
 
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