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Discussion Starter #21
Interesting. My only thought about turning them on edge like a traditional joist system was so that they would be "wall ready" when I'm in the position to pull them out and concrete the floor. The plan is to repurpose the floor sections into wall sections for another building on site. I was going to put them together in a manageable panel sizes.
 

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Interesting. My only thought about turning them on edge like a traditional joist system was so that they would be "wall ready" when I'm in the position to pull them out and concrete the floor. The plan is to repurpose the floor sections into wall sections for another building on site. I was going to put them together in a manageable panel sizes.
Nice idea but a little optimistic at being able to cut them with out destroying the vapour barrier and then trimming the 2x4s back for top and bottom plates to make it a wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Oh I'm anything if not optimistic :vs_laugh:

As you can imagine, I have plenty of room to work with. I also have several buddies and time on my side (Good Lord willing).

The thought was to actually build the wall sections on the ground, pick them up and carry them into place. It's hard to get a visual on this without seeing it. Imagine you are looking down on 3 rows. This is what looking down from the ceiling would be like. I have the substrate ready, insulation and vapor ready.

Now in any one row I have plenty of room to build manageable sections for 4 people to lift and carry into position. Due to the posts that separate the rows, I will have to bridge that with blocking. Building it this way will allow me to go ahead and build the actual walls with the plates. Then when I'm ready I just reverse it and lift the sections back out and take them to the building site. At least...that's the picture that's in my head.
 

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Oh I'm anything if not optimistic :vs_laugh:

As you can imagine, I have plenty of room to work with. I also have several buddies and time on my side (Good Lord willing).

The thought was to actually build the wall sections on the ground, pick them up and carry them into place. It's hard to get a visual on this without seeing it. Imagine you are looking down on 3 rows. This is what looking down from the ceiling would be like. I have the substrate ready, insulation and vapor ready.

Now in any one row I have plenty of room to build manageable sections for 4 people to lift and carry into position. Due to the posts that separate the rows, I will have to bridge that with blocking. Building it this way will allow me to go ahead and build the actual walls with the plates. Then when I'm ready I just reverse it and lift the sections back out and take them to the building site. At least...that's the picture that's in my head.
10 ft high walls? will the walls of the new building need insulation, should they be 2x6"?
I will give you a plan 9 or 10 ft high walls would be easiest to deal with.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
10 ft high walls? will the walls of the new building need insulation, should they be 2x6"?
I will give you a plan 9 or 10 ft high walls would be easiest to deal with.
Correct, 10' is what I was planning for.

The next building will more than likely be a pole barn structure with at least 6x6 posts. These walls will be between the posts and there will be ample room for insulation.
 

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Correct, 10' is what I was planning for.

The next building will more than likely be a pole barn structure with at least 6x6 posts. These walls will be between the posts and there will be ample room for insulation.
Most exterior walls that get insulated are built with 2x6.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Most exterior walls that get insulated are built with 2x6.
Here in the south they use both depending on the R-value you are shooting for; doesn't matter if it's residential or commercial. The future building will not be any sort of living quarters nor an "all-day" use working scenario.
 

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Correct, 10' is what I was planning for.

The next building will more than likely be a pole barn structure with at least 6x6 posts. These walls will be between the posts and there will be ample room for insulation.
So when we build walls on the floor that are going to be sheeted they need to be square, we snap a line on the floor and tack down the bottom plate so it is straight. then when the wall is built we check it from corner to corner both ways and make sure it is square and tack down the top.


Any ideas for how to hold it straight and square while you sheet it?
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
So when we build walls on the floor that are going to be sheeted they need to be square, we snap a line on the floor and tack down the bottom plate so it is straight. then when the wall is built we check it from corner to corner both ways and make sure it is square and tack down the top.


Any ideas for how to hold it straight and square while you sheet it?
Again...thoughts running rampant through my head...

I was first going to make sure that from my corner out was square at my starting point along the wall. It's an old building...I'm sure there's been some sort of shift or movement in almost 80 years. I am going to put a 2x lumber starter strip anchored along the wall that the floor will tie into. Measure it both ways and shim where I need to along the wall to get it squared up.

As per the floor sections themselves...Get them as close as humanly possible and use a little trial and error as necessary. :vs_mad::vs_smirk::vs_laugh::crying:

Build a jig on the floor using a completed section that is square and anchor it down;

Get it square and use L-straps to reinforce it staying square wile moving it;

Using the squared walls to our advantage to getting the wall completely square once it's moved into place and installing a couple pieces of sheeting to hold it in place...
 

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Again...thoughts running rampant through my head...

I was first going to make sure that from my corner out was square at my starting point along the wall. It's an old building...I'm sure there's been some sort of shift or movement in almost 80 years. I am going to put a 2x lumber starter strip anchored along the wall that the floor will tie into. Measure it both ways and shim where I need to along the wall to get it squared up.

As per the floor sections themselves...Get them as close as humanly possible and use a little trial and error as necessary. :vs_mad::vs_smirk::vs_laugh::crying:

Build a jig on the floor using a completed section that is square and anchor it down;

Get it square and use L-straps to reinforce it staying square wile moving it;

Using the squared walls to our advantage to getting the wall completely square once it's moved into place and installing a couple pieces of sheeting to hold it in place...
OK try this the triangle is the 2x4 frame that you would tack to the bottom plate until you have enough sheeting on it to hold it straight.
To check it for square you measure along the blue lines and you could use lumber strapping to go corner to corner to hole it square. and leave the strapping there.
Once you have the first row of sections down, the gig would not be needed and once you have the first one square in the next row, the rest should come up square but could be checked.


As long as all the studs are identical length and the top and bottom plates are matching length exactly.


https://www.uline.ca/Product/Detail/S-826/Steel-Strapping/Standard-Grade-Steel-Strapping-3-4-x-020-x-2058?pricode=YF732&gadtype=pla&id=S-826&gclid=Cj0KCQiAtbnjBRDBARIsAO3zDl98nBdWnriWKiSZTpsN02z7ZBqF2xHXertrfsvOslS5IiQZNOEhymkaAvwfEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
 

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Discussion Starter #32
:vs_bananasplit::vs_rocking_banana:eek:r if I want to really over kill it, cross back over it with 2x like the floating dance floor. :vs_rocking_banana: :vs_bananasplit:
 

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Yep, that looks right :glasses:
I would build them as one long wall that could be cut to length need and just add studs as needed to make the wall or make a join. Blocks between the studs to connect adjoining plates,
Put blocks between first and second rows with nails so they can be pulled apart later. when removing you would cut at the bottom of the second row bottom plate and with the blocks removes the first row would have room for the top plate when you install the wall
 

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Thanks for the links Henry. All great info from what I've read so far. So how deep of an aggregate base are we talking about?
You want the sub-base to be undisturbed earth.

So if that's good and compacted, as is, you just need to add enough sub-grade aggregate to ensure it's flat and level. Then compact it.

If it were me, I'd add 4 inches.
 
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