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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Im in the process of painting my kitchen cabinets I was told that in order for the paint to stick I had to remove the gloss with a liquid deglosser...but...im not sure if its working.
I applied a generous amount of the deglosser on a clean cloth and I passed it over a corner of the cabinets.
But I dont think its working. Isn't it supposed to dull out the paint?? It still looks shinny.

Please help...I wanted to get kitchen done this weekend.

Thanks in advance.

Janet
 

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Do not use Liquid Sandpaper. It has a very short window to work with.

just scuff them up with some sandpaper. Clean with a mixture of dawn and bleach. Let it dry overnight and there you go. I can get very technical for you and send you to places where you could not purchase the products, but why even go there?

If this is a learning project you are better off going to the dump and find some old cabinets someone threw out to practice on. If you start to practice on cabinets that everyone will see day in and day out and you jack it up? Howdy boy, you will be the laughing stock behind your back of coarse.


Whats the coating on there now?
What type of finish is it?
What type of finish do you want to use this time?
What color are you going to chose?
What sheen(Gloss) do you want?

Give me some info and I can tell you how I would specifically tackle this job.

[email protected]
 

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Painting Company, NY
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Im in the process of painting my kitchen cabinets I was told that in order for the paint to stick I had to remove the gloss with a liquid deglosser...but...im not sure if its working.
I applied a generous amount of the deglosser on a clean cloth and I passed it over a corner of the cabinets.
But I dont think its working. Isn't it supposed to dull out the paint?? It still looks shinny.

Please help...I wanted to get kitchen done this weekend.

Thanks in advance.

Janet
Lighly sand them by hand, then clean them with tsp(powder form) mixed in warm water as per directions, apply a bonding primer, sherwin williams has some great bonding primers for glossy surfaces, varnish, ect. Then you can apply your top coat, I would reccomened using two coats of a 100% acrylic enamel, that's got a gloss to it for cleaning purposes.
 

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Painting Company, NY
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Do not use Liquid Sandpaper. It has a very short window to work with.

just scuff them up with some sandpaper. Clean with a mixture of dawn and bleach. Let it dry overnight and there you go. I can get very technical for you and send you to places where you could not purchase the products, but why even go there?

If this is a learning project you are better off going to the dump and find some old cabinets someone threw out to practice on. If you start to practice on cabinets that everyone will see day in and day out and you jack it up? Howdy boy, you will be the laughing stock behind your back of coarse.


Whats the coating on there now?
What type of finish is it?
What type of finish do you want to use this time?
What color are you going to chose?
What sheen(Gloss) do you want?

Give me some info and I can tell you how I would specifically tackle this job.

[email protected]
Chlorine- bleach removes natural wood color, destroys wood lignin (the glue that holds wood fibers together), and corrode metal fasteners and hardware
 

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Chlorine- bleach removes natural wood color, destroys wood lignin (the glue that holds wood fibers together), and corrode metal fasteners and hardware
You remove the hardware before you start the process. Bleach is for the disinfecting part of it while dawn is a surfactant that makes the chlorine cling to the surface. Rinsing is key to any cleaning project. Bleach and chlorine are no nos when using to clean decks because of the porosity of decks. Decks are usually some kind of stain, not solid paint. I am sure the cabinets are painted, so the bleach is not a concern.

Also, go to where professional power washing companies use it on a daily basis on all surfaces including roof cleaning.
 

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Painting Company, NY
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You remove the hardware before you start the process. Bleach is for the disinfecting part of it while dawn is a surfactant that makes the chlorine cling to the surface. Rinsing is key to any cleaning project. Bleach and chlorine are no nos when using to clean decks because of the porosity of decks. Decks are usually some kind of stain, not solid paint. I am sure the cabinets are painted, so the bleach is not a concern.

Also, go to where professional power washing companies use it on a daily basis on all surfaces including roof cleaning.
That's right, bleach and chlorine are a no no on decks, thus making it a no no on siding, such as cedar, a siding that's going to be stained,
 

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The name of the game is not how busy you are but are you making money. I can be slamming 7 crews from Sunday if I cheaped out, but people have to pay a premium for my service. Not saying you are quoting cheap, but the truth is i can now clean 5-7 times faster that you are i bet just because I left my painting pride of 4 generations on the bench and learned from cleaning professionals.

Since most likely they are not real wood cabinets the chlorine will not hurt. porous surfaces is where not to use chlorine. Cedar included.

If people want cheap or can not afford to keep their house up they either need to down size or hire a handy person. I am not doing this for a hobby and consider myself a specialist in the field of painting/deck restoration/power washing. Not being cocky if it seems that way. i just know how home owners think about contractors most of the time and I can not waste time trying to over educate homeowners on the pitfalls of hiring Harold The Handy Man who studied his craft at home depot and on line courses. Again, not talking about you.
 

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Painting Company, NY
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The name of the game is not how busy you are but are you making money. I can be slamming 7 crews from Sunday if I cheaped out, but people have to pay a premium for my service. Not saying you are quoting cheap, but the truth is i can now clean 5-7 times faster that you are i bet just because I left my painting pride of 4 generations on the bench and learned from cleaning professionals.

Since most likely they are not real wood cabinets the chlorine will not hurt. porous surfaces is where not to use chlorine. Cedar included.

If people want cheap or can not afford to keep their house up they either need to down size or hire a handy person. I am not doing this for a hobby and consider myself a specialist in the field of painting/deck restoration/power washing. Not being cocky if it seems that way. i just know how home owners think about contractors most of the time and I can not waste time trying to over educate homeowners on the pitfalls of hiring Harold The Handy Man who studied his craft at home depot and on line courses. Again, not talking about you.
Ok, thanks. There is always that one contractor with a tremendous ego, I am not saying you. Some contractors don't remain open minded and they stop learning, thus they stop learning, they only work part time, looking for the big job, then there bankrupt. If a contractor has more than one crew its because his reputation is built on quality and he has expanded his area of service, to maybee another state. If your painting prides left on the bench, then where is the quality? Taking pride in your work is going to equal quality. Some contractors only have one crew, they do not have the skills to manage more than one crew.
 

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Painting Company, NY
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The name of the game is not how busy you are but are you making money. I can be slamming 7 crews from Sunday if I cheaped out, but people have to pay a premium for my service. Not saying you are quoting cheap, but the truth is i can now clean 5-7 times faster that you are i bet just because I left my painting pride of 4 generations on the bench and learned from cleaning professionals.

Since most likely they are not real wood cabinets the chlorine will not hurt. porous surfaces is where not to use chlorine. Cedar included.

If people want cheap or can not afford to keep their house up they either need to down size or hire a handy person. I am not doing this for a hobby and consider myself a specialist in the field of painting/deck restoration/power washing. Not being cocky if it seems that way. i just know how home owners think about contractors most of the time and I can not waste time trying to over educate homeowners on the pitfalls of hiring Harold The Handy Man who studied his craft at home depot and on line courses. Again, not talking about you.
I have been doing what I do for a long time, and it was a long time into the trade before I even thought about starting my own business. I don't buy anything at home depot or lowes or any large box store. As far as herold the painter I would say that probably every town has a few and when I give someone a proposal and they tell me its to high I tell them to keep my number and call me when there paint or stain job fails, because if Harold the painter is painting there home he does not have any over head, not giving a warranty, not using quality products, and not giving quality work, my reputation is built on quality, a lot of my work is through referrals. We do residential repaints, commercial, and new construction. I do this every day for a living, I do it from the comfort of my office, where as harold the painter is just doing this in the spring, summer, and fall if he's lucky. I don't have a problem with doing new construction because I am fully insured, bonded, have the knowledge, skill, manpower, can estimate off of prints, and if a sub messes up my work, I back bill them.
 

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Not to interrupt you two guys but why don't you PM each other?:yes:You both have valid points but I am not sure this is the place to get into it, the first poster ask a question and look where it has lead.:wink:

quote,
" then clean them with tsp(powder form) mixed in warm water as per directions,"


If you go this route, be sure to thoroughly rinse the residue of the tsp with clear water as it leaves a film that primer will not stick too.


To partially answer the original question, I am not a believer in liquid de glossers and would also just sand manually.:whistling2:
 

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Some things to add. You reall need to determine if the paint that is on there is oil based or latex. If it's oil, I highly recommend you either continue with oil based paint or atleast use an oil based primer first. The company I work for swears by the Sherwin Williams Latex Bonding primer and I think it sucks. We have done countless jobs with the stuff and all you have to do is just brush up against the wall or woodwork and you will peel the crap right off. We just had to go back to a job that was done 4 months ago and the paint is coming off the walls every place anyone has touched the wall.
 
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