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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need help! Leak coming between slab foundation and sill plate. I removed the baseboard and I can see the tiny bit of water seeping in. The area is above grade but the frame is set back 4-5 inches off the slab. (It looks like they were going to add brick to the outside and changed their mind.)
From the exterior you can see where the slab foundation meets the wall of ?concrete board? Looks like they used it instead of plywood at the base. If I press really hard the concrete board wall it has a tiny little give to it. Making me believe the seam between the wall and slab is the source of water.

Looked behind the siding - no visible moisture damage on the exterior wall just in case we used the adhesive tape to seal around the window, light fixture and outlet.
Previous owner was an idiot with repairs. He used thinset or something like that on the exterior to seal the wall to the slab to keep water out of the seam. Of course this is not waterproof and is flaking off.
I believe the water is coming from either of these two places. There is a joint of the 2 pieces of cement board wall come together or water is coming from where the cement board wall meets the base. Thinking if I seal this area it should fix the problem. I am not sure what to use to make a permanent watertight seal along the seam any suggestion? Please don't say silicone. Suggest anything but silicone.
 

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amesresearch.com OR sanitred.com,,, siding should be removed & proper flashing installed but this'll work in a pinch :thumbsup:
 

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Someone really screwed on this one and broke all the framing and building 101rules.

That wall should have been built out even with the edge of the slab on a stem wall of block.
Siding and sheathing should be no closer the 6" of grade.
James Hardee panels can be no closer the 2" of grade and can not be installed in an area where there not going to dry out. (bottom of the wall will trap moisture)

About the best you can do now is remove the bottom few rows of siding and use something like Storm and ice shield up the wall and down over the slab and cover it up with aluminum or copper coil stock that also runs up behind the siding.
http://www.epa.gov/indoorairplus/technical/moisture/images/large/19.jpg
 

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Looked behind the siding - no visible moisture damage on the exterior wall just in case we used the adhesive tape to seal around the window, light fixture and outlet.
Adhesive tape?????

You said you removed the baseboard and can see water seeping in. Where is the water seeping in on the inside in relation to the outside?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are there gutters on the home? Looks like you have some erosion as well from roof run off.
Yes we do have gutters but this side of the house is 3 stories straight up. Plus there isn't grass in this area because of a previous septic issue. As soon as I get the leak fixed I've got to get the grass growing here. I know I don't want to have the water splashing up on the house too.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Adhesive tape?????

You said you removed the baseboard and can see water seeping in. Where is the water seeping in on the inside in relation to the outside?
I'm not sure what you call the tape but you use it around windows and doors it make a watertight seal. Its adhesive and silver. I used it all around the window, light and outlet just in case water was sneaking in there. It didn't help.

Comparing interior to exterior the leak is between the door and window. About 3 inches left of the window. Looked at the area again and noticed a rusty nail head about 2 inched up in the concrete backer board and that is the same area where the wall has tiny give to it. The seam of the wall and slab plus this nail has got to be the source. Thinking if I silicone the area the spray with water I'll know for certain. Then I can figure out how to fix it right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Did your inside look something like this??
Ours isn't that bad. But similar. The idiot that owner the home before was in love with silicone. He used a couple tubes to hold back the water from the carpet. When the silicone failed I found the wet carpet. Just like your picture water came in at the base. Between the frame and foundation, no evidence of it coming from above.

I found the water fairly quickly so not much has been damaged. Carpet and pad can be saved and drywall isn't damaged. Using a dehumidifier in the room too.

Honestly, This guy even used superglue and caulking to hold up a shoe shelf in the closet. When I went to move it I found it had anchors too. How heavy did he think his boots were? In this house when I see white silicone I get frightened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
About the best you can do now is remove the bottom few rows of siding and use something like Storm and ice shield up the wall and down over the slab and cover it up with aluminum or copper coil stock that also runs up behind the siding.
http://www.epa.gov/indoorairplus/technical/moisture/images/large/19.jpg

Sounds like we did something similar on the other side of the house. Water was coming in where the brick wall met the siding. The top brick was not angled and the flashing was raised. Water was getting under the flashing and running behind into framing and on down to the basement.
In picture left is crappy way. on right is our fix.

Your idea is good..What about weeds getting up under the flashing? Also I don't want it to look like a repair. I couldn't continue it all the way because of the two doors. Metal on one side of the wall would stand out as a repair.

?? What do you think about cleaning it all off, doing a good concrete patch all along the area and sealing it with extreme drylock or some other product? Still think I need some sort of barrier to keep water out. They claim the extreme drylock is a masonry waterproofer good for inside and outside. I am concerned that concrete even painted/sealed might not be waterproof. Also, Not sure if that was what the previous owner was going for with his thinset patch and failed?
 

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joecaption said:
About the best you can do now is remove the bottom few rows of siding and use something like Storm and ice shield up the wall and down over the slab and cover it up with aluminum or copper coil stock that also runs up behind the siding.
http://www.epa.gov/indoorairplus/technical/moisture/images/large/19.jpg
I like this solution. Find a metal fabricator who can bend the flashing to a suitable profile. Use a heavier gauge metal so it holds its shape if stepped on. A folded drip edge should help hold the shape.

I have a similar problem where a small addition on my home was built on the aggregate deck. I will install a flashing also. In my case I will cut the concrete deck along the wall to accept the drip edge of the flashing. A small channel for water to follow. It will look like crap until I smash-out and replace and lower the aggregate deck by a few inches. Pain in the pocket-book.



Previous owner liked silicone too. Useless. I hope my sole plates aren't rotted out.
 

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The way that was done is a 100% sure way to end up with rotted out siding and trim. Siding needed to be removed at the bottom of the wall, sheathing water proofed, 1 X 6 vinyl lumber, Z moulding, then replace the siding.
 
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Sounds like we did something similar on the other side of the house. Water was coming in where the brick wall met the siding. The top brick was not angled and the flashing was raised. Water was getting under the flashing and running behind into framing and on down to the basement.
In picture left is crappy way. on right is our fix.

Your idea is good..What about weeds getting up under the flashing? Also I don't want it to look like a repair. I couldn't continue it all the way because of the two doors. Metal on one side of the wall would stand out as a repair.

?? What do you think about cleaning it all off, doing a good concrete patch all along the area and sealing it with extreme drylock or some other product? Still think I need some sort of barrier to keep water out. They claim the extreme drylock is a masonry waterproofer good for inside and outside. I am concerned that concrete even painted/sealed might not be waterproof. Also, Not sure if that was what the previous owner was going for with his thinset patch and failed?

that right there in the pic is what you want to do on the concrete side also, a tilted piece of 3/4" cpvc sealed up well where it butts the wall. it is like a big drip cap that goes over a window and door. cut two little 1/8" grooves back up underneath the front bottom edge a 1/2" or so back so that any water that travels back under will stop at the grooves. sealing the drip cap at the underside of the J molding will be the trickiest part but do-able.
 
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