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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The lip on this stubout out is chipped in a few places and no longer water tight. It appears this chrome pipe is soldered in; does that look correct? I could put a pipe wrench on the stubout but I'm afraid I'll cause catastrophic damage to it.

House was built in 1962 and the remainder of the drains were cast iron so I'm guessing that's what's behind the wall.

Is there anyway to replace this without cutting open the drywall and replacing the junction in the wall with PVC?

I am concerned about using a slip joint because the chrome will eventually just rust through.
 

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@heller.luke Hard to say for sure judging by the photo, but I agree with you, it does appear to be soldered some how.

To me, it looks like the chrome trap arm was shoved into the brass, cast or whatever type of pipe that is in the wall and soldered.

What type of pipe is the drain line in the wall? Any threads on it anywhere?
 

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I agree with you, use plastic pvc trap and trap arm and it will last a lot longer.

Imo, that chrome looks nice, but rots out fast and doesn't last as long as plastic from my experience.

Btw, welcome to the forums @heller.luke
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@heller.luke Hard to say for sure judging by the photo, but I agree with you, it does appear to be soldered some how.

To me, it looks like the chrome trap arm was shoved into the brass, cast or whatever type of pipe that is in the wall and soldered.

What type of pipe is the drain line in the wall? Any threads on it anywhere?
No threads visible at all. I have applied liquid wrench and put some heat on it with a propane torch; seemed to do nothing but the heat was limited lest I catch something on fire in there

I'm really anxious about putting a wrench on that pipe and demolishing it.
 

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Auto stores have strong magnet pickup. Put the magnet on the hub inside the wall and see. This is because of the question, was it soldered or not. I'm not a plumber so speaking from my limited experience. I don't think soldering to castiron is possible, so if magnet doesn't stick, it is probably brass.
If soldered, and you don't want to make this into demo and complete replacement, cut the tail about 2" from wall and use rubber hubless connector. That is as long as that tail is solid.
And it is kitchen sink, so use pvc compression trap.
 

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I believe what you have is a brass male iron pipe thread by solder or lead bushing. I have never bought one in 30 years of plumbing.... Is this an old house?
I have dealt with traps leaded into tees before and I cut the tee out, installed a new one with a plastic trap adapter and and changed the trap to a tubular plastic instead of chrome
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I believe what you have is a brass male iron pipe thread by solder or lead bushing. I have never bought one in 30 years of plumbing.... Is this an old house?
I have dealt with traps leaded into tees before and I cut the tee out, installed a new one with a plastic trap adapter and and changed the trap to a tubular plastic instead of chrome
House built in 1962 in western north Carolina.
It sounds like the proper fix may be to cut out the T and there's no simple way to remove the solder/lead? I willing to open up the wall and do it. Just don't want to unless it's my only GOOD option!
 

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The lip on this stubout out is chipped in a few places and no longer water tight. It appears this chrome pipe is soldered in; does that look correct? I could put a pipe wrench on the stubout but I'm afraid I'll cause catastrophic damage to it.

House was built in 1962 and the remainder of the drains were cast iron so I'm guessing that's what's behind the wall.

Is there anyway to replace this without cutting open the drywall and replacing the junction in the wall with PVC?

I am concerned about using a slip joint because the chrome will eventually just rust through.

What you have is called a solder collar. The only way to fix it properly is cut the trap out flush and then hacksaw without destroying the threads on the fitting in the wall. It should peel out with a screw driver and hammer once you cut it a few times.
Then you should install a 1 1/2 or 1 1/4 FIP trap adaptor.



Have fun and be careful you do not cut too deep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

What you have is called a solder collar. The only way to fix it properly is cut the trap out flush and then hacksaw without destroying the threads on the fitting in the wall. It should peel out with a screw driver and hammer once you cut it a few times.
Then you should install a 1 1/2 or 1 1/4 FIP trap adaptor.



Have fun and be careful you do not cut too deep.
Thanks ghostmaker! I'm gonna get on it this week when I find the spare time. I'll report back on the result. So much appreciate the guidance!
 

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Solder collar ? --- see, I learn something new every day on the forum.

Now, somebody explain why they don't put a hex on one end? How does somebody install that thing ?
 

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Solder collar ? --- see, I learn something new every day on the forum.

Now, somebody explain why they don't put a hex on one end? How does somebody install that thing ?
The plumber would solder the chrome trap into the collar then once it was cool apply pipe dope and screw it in using the trap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Problem solved. I found that this brass collar had male threads. I cut it into 6 sections hoping I would come apart but wasn't daring enough to go deep enough. I used a sawzall. Cut wide enough grooves for my pry bar. Hammered the pry bar into the grooves and then turned it out to remove it.

Now to somehow get the 60 years of clogged hair out of that drain inside the wall....

Thanks for the hand holding!
 

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Problem solved. I found that this brass collar had male threads. I cut it into 6 sections hoping I would come apart but wasn't daring enough to go deep enough. I used a sawzall. Cut wide enough grooves for my pry bar. Hammered the pry bar into the grooves and then turned it out to remove it.

Now to somehow get the 60 years of clogged hair out of that drain inside the wall....

Thanks for the hand holding!
Ghost explained that in post 12.....;)
 
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