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Discussion Starter #1
I need to repair a severely cracked fiberglass tub. It was repaired a year ago and has recently re-cracked. I have personally never repaired it, but I will have to this time. I believe there are too many weak spots underneath the tub and so it is easily cracked.

I need to go to the Home Depot/Lowes today in the evening to get supplies, and then I will work on it so the tub is ready by Sunday.

Please let me know what I will need in terms of supplies and what tools I will need to get. If you have any links to detailed instructions on how to do this properly, please let me know. I really need to make this a permanent repair, if it recracks again I will have to install a new tub which I do not want to do.

Thanks so much for your help, I do appreciate it:)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, lol, yeah I had started that thread earlier but I wanted to get some more information. Particularly on a very cracked fiberglass tub. I was hoping I could get some more information about whether or not to use an inlay, structolite vs great stuff, if I should be attempting to get under the tub in other ways since the support and foundation is a big problem right now, etc.

If not, that's okay, I have to go and attempt it very soon and I will update on my progress. Thanks for the help
 

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the Musigician
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Reading through your first post, I think I'd tear it all out and put in a cast iron clawfoot tub and wrap-around curtain for the shower.

Add waterproof wall(s) to complete it.

DM
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the suggestions guys. Ok, you had mentioned putting in a cast iron tub. I saw at Lowes they have steel tubs for $100. I heard people saying they were cheap, etc. But what I need is something that will functionally work for at least a few years. I am not worried about cosmetics. And having a roommate that is 400 plus pounds makes me think that steel may bend, but not crack, right? Won't a stainless steel tub work functionally for a few years? Can't I just put one of those in?

What are the cons to putting in a $100 steel tub?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry Bud Cline, what I meant to say was that I started a new thread because my first thread was about installing a new tub, I wanted to make this thread more about possibly repairing the tub instead (at your suggestion to try to repair the tub).

I actually was running short on time today, so I went and bought that "great stuff" even though some say structolite is better (the pro had used "great stuff" when he repaired my tub). I couldn't find an injectable "structolite" brand. I only found "great stuff" that was injectable so I bought it.

Anyways, I injected 3 cans of great stuff into the bottom of the tub where it was cracked. I will need to buy some more tomorrow since there was still empty space under the tub. Is there any other injectable filler or support that I can inject under the tub that is better used for this purpose? Something that will support heavy weight. Should I use more "great stuff?"

If there isn't any injectable material to buy besides "great stuff," what else can I do to try to provide more support under the tub? I'm assuming the main support is usually mortar, but I don't know how I would get more of that under the tub.
 

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the Musigician
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While the old one is out, check for floor damage where it already leaked before putting in a new tub.

DM
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well the old tub is still attached to the walls and floor, I can't see any damage. Just been filling in the cracks. If I do end up removing the tub, I will definitely check for damage before putting a new tub in. Thanks for the suggestion. Right now though, I will attempt to repair the tub one last time and see if I can do it right (the pro had done it twice and failed at it, I thought I would try it since it's cheap to try, so why not).
 

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the Musigician
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With that much weight on it, I don't think the foam will do much to support anything.

It IS foam, after all.... but it's worth a shot I guess.

DM
 

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if you do replace the tub with a steel one make sure to support the bottom completely. steel tubs do chip easily and the finish in them is pretty thin.
 

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While you were looking at steel tubs did you see any cast iron models. If Lowes doesn't have them HD does have a Kohler Villager. They retail for around 300 and weigh about the same but it sounds like the best solution considering the roomate. Any tub would work as long as the bottom is properly supported. But the cast iron already provides all the support you need in it's bottom and levels with steel shims of for little feet.

The next consideration is that the subfloor and joists below that can handle the weight. There is likely to be water damage from all the leaks you have already had.

My project thread has some good info http://www.diychatroom.com/f49/jims-downstairs-bathroom-project-66655/ particularly post # 12 & 13 located on the first page.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Alright guys, did the repair, but decided to replace the tub next week. The repair will buy me a good amount of time to look around for the right tub.

It seems like many people here think that the best tub for my situation would be a cast iron tub. I have no problems with that whatsoever. Just some concerns.

Ok, I've basically narrowed it down to steel or a cast iron clawfoot tub. The cost of them isn't too much of an issue, since I can get steel tubs for $100 at Lowes, and cast iron clawfoot tubs on craigslist for about $200.

My main concern about steel is not about the cosmetics breaking down, but that it will somehow brreak and leak water again. I also want to make sure I install a good foundation for it due to the weight of my roommate.

My main concern about the cast iron tub is literally just moving the darned thing. I hear they are usually 300 plus pounds. To bring it inside my condo I will have to move it around 2 very tight corners. I'm also worried about the weight of the tub plus the weight of my roommate together in that area of the condo. If there is water damage that I can not see, I want to make sure that that area will be able to support 700 plus pounds.

So with that said, will a steel tub with a good foundation be the right choice for a 400 plus pound man? Or should I deal with moving a heavy and durable clawfoot cast iron tub and put more potential stress on the floor due to its weight?
 

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Tileguy
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The cast iron tub can be up-ended on a rented furniture dolly and moved anywhere you want it to go.:)

The steel tub will likely still require a substantial foundation to support the tub and its contents. It just depends on how the tub is constructed.:)

Some information about the floor structure could be helpful but I doubt your floor structure is any different than anyone else's.:) Cast iron is used all the time. The claw-foot tub may be a different story and may require additional subfloor.:yes:
 

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the Musigician
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A well made fiberglass tub will do the job just fine. Mine does. It's all in the foundation preparation.
I got my tub at Habitat for Humanity brand new for around $50.00. It has a sheet of OSB fiberglassed right to the bottom.
I built a 2x4 frame underneath to support it fully and I'd trust your room-mate showering in it, even if he weighed 100 lbs more!
Be sure to check the flooring for damage before deciding on any new tub though, you may need to replace joists, flooring, etc. first.

DM
 

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A claw foot tub looks nice but remember that the weight of the tub, water, and occupant will be transferred to the 4 feet- not spread out over the footprint of the tub.
I think your best choice will be a top quality fiberglass unit or a standard cast iron unit. Your bathroom appears to be 5ft wide so you will have a hard time positioning a new tub. A glass unit will be easier to install. Support the base well and you could prolly put a hippo in it.
 

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A well made fiberglass tub will do the job just fine. Mine does. It's all in the foundation preparation.
I got my tub at Habitat for Humanity brand new for around $50.00. It has a sheet of OSB fiberglassed right to the bottom.
I built a 2x4 frame underneath to support it fully and I'd trust your room-mate showering in it, even if he weighed 100 lbs more!
Be sure to check the flooring for damage before deciding on any new tub though, you may need to replace joists, flooring, etc. first.

DM
That sounds like a good idea. How do you fiberglass a sheet of osb to the bottom of a tub?
 

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the Musigician
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They just do I guess.... I got it that way at H4H. I'd never seen it before either, but I thought it was a darn good idea!
There's a thread I did with pics of it here somewheres......

DM
 
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