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Discussion Starter #1
So this is part of a large project I'm working on. I've got another thread for the floor Help - Wood barn floor over dirt .

Well, I think that has about answered all my questions for that component. My next big venture is the roof! Much like the floor, "Rome wasn't built in a day" The roof will be in stages. Here's what I'm working with:

1. 300' x 50' Barn (formerly a chicken house)
2. Existing roof is metal I'm assuming the age of the building which is almost 80 years old. It has plenty of issues to where it needs to be replaced.
3. 80 years ago I don't think they were concerned with a straight roof line for the chickens. I'm sure it's sagged a little from age and water intrusion.
4. There are probably 20 vent stacks on top that are in good shape that I want to keep. I will eventually install fans in them.
5. Currently there are items in dry storage that I need to keep dry so removing 300' of roofing at one time is NOT and option.
6. I've got access to enough "scratch and dent" metal roofing to recover the entire roof. I don't mean dented to where it will allow pooling or intrusion.
7. I've got all of the lumber necessary to replace and or sister any truss pieces that need to be leveled. Also 1x4's to strip the trusses to attach the metal to.

So...that's what I've got...along with my working plan...just like the floor :vs_smirk:

The plan...Break the roof down into manageable sections. Like the floor I would do a section on one end and then go do a section on the other (yes there is a method to my madness). The thought being that without taking the entire roof off, how could one EVER get 300' perfectly level? To combat this my thought was to plan an offset. I would work on a 50-75' section on each end. Get that leveled and roofed. The next section I would sister to the existing truss with a 2x10 or 2x12 and raise that area from the roof. Yes, I know...the ends are still not going to match up...but I would think that the break would make it less noticeable. For the final section in the center of the building...that's a MUCH LARGER TASK.

The proposed plan for that center section of the building will include eventually closing off the two 125-150' sections of the building with a new wall; essentially making them separate buildings. Then opening up the center of the building with a new roof line. It will become more of a covered patio area. Gotta have that 5 year plan.

But the roof sections from the end are first....so GO!!!! What do you guys have?
 

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Naildriver
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The anticipated life of a chicken house is about 20 years. 80 years ago, the lumber was probably more stable, and you may reinforce it better and slat the rafters to install your metal. I would not look for a long lived building, as their general structure was not cross braced, nor were the rafter/joist spans of a reasonable distance.

I didn't get in on the floor thingy, but if you have 80 years of chicken poop on the ground, without extensive excavating, things won't get better.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The floor has been excavated. It's hard red clay. The chicken house was not used for chickens for all 80 years. It was not a full blown boiler house. It was a hatchery.

As per the lumber, the owners were very good at keeping the maintenance up until they got older. You can see where posts, beams and rafters have been replaced as needed and the owners pointed out what has been changed and what needs immediate attention. There are some areas of deterioration as expected, but for 90% of the structure it is solid. The main support posts are spaced approximately 10' apart give or take an inch and are placed on concrete pads. The walls are concrete block on poured footers. The rafters are set on 24" centers and slats for the roofing are every 4'. There are 18' overhangs all the way around. From post to poster there are 2x10's front and back that run the length of the building. There are rafters on top of those. Gussets run from the posts up to the 2x10's. I've had the walls looked at for issues and repaired. The only issue is where the farmer ran into the end of the barn with his trailer while driving through the door with a load of hay. Amazingly he didn't pull the entire wall down, just a few outside bricks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well I only have the images on my phone and it's wanting a weblink for the pictures. UGH. I don't have an image from the side of the building. I'll have to get that on Saturday. It's dark when I get home and when I leave :sad:
 

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Use a laser to shoot a line lengthwise from end to end.

Every 20 to 30 feet along this line, build a semi-sturdy column or pad to establish a height reference that could accommodate a variety of measuring aids including a pole reaching up to the level of the roof ridge board. Then build new rafters or trusses every 20 to 30 feet to sketch out a level line at ridge level and add new intervening rafters or trusses.

If you like the original roof dimensions then you might be able to salvage some of the existing rafters and roof framing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Use a laser to shoot a line lengthwise from end to end.

Every 20 to 30 feet along this line, build a semi-sturdy column or pad to establish a height reference that could accommodate a variety of measuring aids including a pole reaching up to the level of a roof ridge beam. Then build new rafters or trusses every 20 to 30 feet to sketch out a level line at ridge level and add new intervening rafters or trusses.
Wouldn't this method require the complete removal of the roof in order to have a clear path to start with?
 

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retired framer
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Well I only have the images on my phone and it's wanting a weblink for the pictures. UGH. I don't have an image from the side of the building. I'll have to get that on Saturday. It's dark when I get home and when I leave :sad:
I use a old phone for camera only and down load it to the computer
 

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Do you have a clear line of sight from end to end down near ground level? Or a clear line of sight through the roof framing between the ceiling joists and the rafters?

Reference level pads could be at any height off the ground. Since height measuring is done with a vertical pole, roof sections could be rebuilt in any order.

A second laser line shot high above ground and down the center of the building can be used to make sure that the new ridge board is centered and straight. It could be slightly above roof level, and re-shot each time a section of roofing is torn off and the structure beneath is rebuilt..
 
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