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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new here and need some professional help. I'm going crazy trying to match the [COLOR=blue !important][COLOR=blue !important]color[/COLOR][/COLOR] in the picture below.. It is a very common neutral color but I just can't find it. Got 5 or 6 samples from Lowes but still not getting it right. I'm really frustrated... Anyone can help me out and let me now what color is this or how should I go about finding this exact color for my bedroom? Thanks...

Wood flooring Laminate flooring Room Ceiling Floor
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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Not entirely certain I know what you are trying to match as the photo link displays an off white dining room shown under a couple color temperatures of light just to start. It looks like the walls could be bluish but this is not obvious? Is this what you are trying to match and what I should be seeing?

Here are a couple of approaches for you to try.

1. All the major paint companies publish white and off white color collection tools. See if you can get your hands on one that is meant for you to take home and keep. If not, ask to borrow the off-white fan deck from a real paint store. It is unlikely a box store will even know what a fan deck is. And you should get paint from a paint store, fish from a fish store, etc.

This is the techie, nerd, dweeb, gearhead approach to getting just that blue (or any color for that matter). Just start with a crisp image.

2a. Move your cursor over a place in the image that has the hue, saturation and value you want.

2b. Use a pixel grabber (oodles free for download online and I suspect some Windows or Mac utilities come with them) to capture the RGB color code for the pixel you want. You will actually see it change as you roll the cursor over different colors.

2c. Go to www.easyrgb.com---a free program---and enter the RGB code for the pixel you captured.

2d. Choose from one of the major paint companies supported by the program (e.g. Sherwin Williams, Benjamin Moore) and the software will translate the RGB code from the pixel you captured to the paint chip name and number closest to it in the manufacturer's color collections.

2e. Take this chip number/name to your paint store and get an actual large swatch or even a sample jar to try out at home. If it is the color you want you are ready to cut-n-roll. Order as much paint you need.

Remember that paint usually looks one shade darker than the little chips you bring home when applied to the wall. Especially for subtle tints like you are considering make sure you mix enough paint to finish your project as it will be hard to match up if you find you need another gallon later. Mix all the paint you buy together before applying any of it too.

Whenever you start using your computer to judge, select or compare color it is a good idea to set your monitor to the standard color profile for such things. You want the color temperature to be set to 6500k. There should be a profile for RGB viewing set to this you just need to load. Worst case you have to download it which will take a couple seconds.

Easy RGB has a color temp correction utility but it is per session and not system wide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you sdsester... I'm gonna try these tips out... I used the Paint tool in my computer trying to grab the color code, but it varies while I move the cursor around, i think it really depends on the light..It is the dinning room color that I wanted to match.. I'm going to try again what you described..Thanks again!
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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The pixel color will vary, pixel to pixel so find some in the region of the image that most closely matches the color you want and use this as a starting point. Find a pixel grabber that lets you mouse click to capture the code or even tiny hand movement will cause the cursor to roll over to a different pixel. You can, of course, enlarge a section of the image to zero in on specific pixels.

The other color software tool I use a lot is Color Impact from Tiger Color. It is $49 or so for a license but I use it all the time. You can try it for free for 30 days which should be sufficient time to tweak the blue color you want?

Enter the RGB code from your pixel grabber into the place provided in ColorImpact. A swatch based on the code will be produced. With it you can build color wheels, try tints, schemes, blends and so forth. When you get just the color you want? Use the RGB for it and proceed to www.easyrgb.com to get your paint codes.
 

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Stuck in the 70's
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Very much not an expert here, so some one here tell me if I'm wrong, but I think you will be endlessly frustrated trying to perfectly match a paint color to something on a computer screen.
Anything on your screen will have a bit of a glow. Think of it this way. A stained glass window looks totally different at night than it does on a bright day. It's the same glass, but the light behind it will have a significant effect.
 
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