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Discussion Starter #1
I have a room in the basement with a concrete floor that slopes 2" over 11 feet. It's finished in that it has drywall, but there is no flooring yet. I need to raise the floor to be level. The room has a high corner.

Plan:

Use dry pack mud to raise the floor to level. Use thinset on the floor prior to the deck mud to help it adhere.

Issues/Questions:


  • It's my understanding mud shouldn't touch drywall, so should I cut out the 2" of drywall where I need to level it?
  • If I should cut out the drywall, should I put backer board in it's place? (2" of concrete would be over the footer 2x4.
  • How thin can I go with deck mud? I've read the thinnest I can go is 3/4 of an inch. If that's true, what should I use to finish the last 3/4 of an inch where it feathers into the high corner?
Thank you for your help, any info or links will be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Actually, I'm not sure. It's going to be a gym room, so at this point, it would just be concrete. Not sure what I could put down on the floor below grade that wouldn't mold when ready to sell, but God willing, no plans to sell right now. Thanks!
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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SLC.... Self leveling cement..... Costly.... but works.... may need two pours.
 

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retired framer
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SLC.... Self leveling cement..... Costly.... but works.... may need two pours.
Agreed but then you want to remove some drywall add more height to the bottom sill plate and protect that wood from contract with the concrete.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Agreed but then you want to remove some drywall add more height to the bottom sill plate and protect that wood from contract with the concrete.
How do you add height to the sill plate? I was thinking backer board or something like that, about 2 or 3 inches up the wall.

What about using a 1x4 off of the drywall and letting the mix set up a bit and then taking out the 1x4 before the mix is dry. That would leave a gap between the build-up and the drywall without it touching.

If I decided to go with tile when time to sell, I could tile directly up to the drywall and cover the gap, since it's small.
 

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retired framer
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How do you add height to the sill plate? I was thinking backer board or something like that, about 2 or 3 inches up the wall.

What about using a 1x4 off of the drywall and letting the mix set up a bit and then taking out the 1x4 before the mix is dry. That would leave a gap between the build-up and the drywall without it touching.

If I decided to go with tile when time to sell, I could tile directly up to the drywall and cover the gap, since it's small.
Put 2x4 or 2x6 which ever the wall is blocks, on the sill between the studs to at least 1 1/2 inches above the new level. Peal and stick against the wood up to the new level line and just a bit onto the floor to seal the concrete away from the wood.
Self leveling is much like water so there would be no way of removing a form
But if you put a wedge behind the form you would be able to pull that after.
I have seen a metal wedge that was made for that. But I don't how available there are.
There are people here that know much more about this stuff than I do.:vs_cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Could the peal and stick be applied directly to the drywall, instead of having to cut the drywall, then add 2x4 between the studs?

Thanks for the video.
 

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retired framer
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Then you have to figure what you need to see if it would be cost effective.
With a chalk put a grid on the floor every 2 feet on the floor and draw the same grid on a piece of paper including the walls.
Get one of theses levels and set it at the highest spot of the floor measure the distance from from the floor to the line right at the machine. Call that number the base height.
No measure each spot on the grid including against the walls, subtract the base and record that on the paper. When done add all those numbers to together and and divide it by the number of spots you measure. Now you have an average depth for the hole room
times the number of square ft. Make that number what ever part of a foot that it is like 1/8 average would 8 x 12 + 96 then sq feet divided by 96 = cu ft.
I did that in a hurry so some one should check that.
 

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retired framer
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Could the peal and stick be applied directly to the drywall, instead of having to cut the drywall, then add 2x4 between the studs?

Thanks for the video.
If it ever gets we it would be really hard to deal with, mold and all that but sure. That is what the do on commercial sites because the don;t care or believe it will never get wet.
 

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I used the self leveling compound from Lowes to correct a low spot in a floor prior to installing hardwood. my floor contractor advised not to use thin set. Said it would crack and crumble under the new floor. The self leveling compound worked great. I read a lot about it before I used it and everyone stressed to mix it exactly as directed. Add the exact amount of water. When finished and dry it looks like cement but has a kind of rubbery feel to it. Might be just what you want for a gym floor. just be sure to mix it really really well or you will have lumps that you will have to sand or scrape off later
 

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retired framer
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I used the self leveling compound from Lowes to correct a low spot in a floor prior to installing hardwood. my floor contractor advised not to use thin set. Said it would crack and crumble under the new floor. The self leveling compound worked great. I read a lot about it before I used it and everyone stressed to mix it exactly as directed. Add the exact amount of water. When finished and dry it looks like cement but has a kind of rubbery feel to it. Might be just what you want for a gym floor. just be sure to mix it really really well or you will have lumps that you will have to sand or scrape off later
YEP on JIMBO ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^100%

And if multiple bags are used, working time is very fast...you need good organization and probably a helper.

You'll want your water measurements deadon (premeasured buckets). a good heavy duty drill and paddle, bags cut open and organized to dump, and a suitable leveling rake... (the stuff is self leveling sort of.... but some light rakeing helps get that flow going and level).... and you want ANY/ALL drain holes pluged (the stuff will drip through all cracks/ nail-screw holes.)

And the stuff is pretty pricey.... if you have an evident high spot, I'd consider grinding it down, rather than filling to it, as a matter of cost saving.

Good luck
 
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