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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
All of the rooms are connected, ideally I don't do thresholds but if I do then I'd prefer it on all rooms instead of just one or two so it looks consistant. Kitchen and bathroom will be tile, all other rooms will be the same bamboo floating hardwood floor. Stairs will be hardwood too.

Which direction should I lay them and should I switch at any point (living to dining room, bedrooms, etc)?

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
since your living room has the longest wall I'd go parallel with that one.
Would that look odd in the hallway as there would be small strips all the way down? One of the realtors said that when we were looking at a place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I talked to the the guys at two stores today and they both told me that if the distance is longer than 30' I need to break the floor with a t-molding. As you can see in my above floor plan the living room down the hall is longer than 30' so would I have to put a tmolding in the hallway? That would look kind of odd and it feels like a hazard.
 

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Did the guys at the store explain why you can't go longer than 30'? I'd never heard that one before.

What kind of subfloor? Is it concrete? Plywood?

If it's the latter, you only have one choice and that is to go perpendicular to the floor joists. If it's concrete, then you can go either way.

Personally, if it's concrete, I'd go parallel with the hallway. However, if you want to get fancy, why not do an angled transition from the corner by the stairs to the corner of the kitchen/living room? Then you can have the living room be parallel with the fireplace wall and the hallway can be perpendicular to that.
 

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At that point the expansion of all of the planks together could be greater than the gap that you have left at the walls causing the floor to buckle.
That makes sense.

But by using a T-molding, aren't you eliminating the expansion space at one end of the run? For example, if you leave 3/8" at each end, you have 3/4" available for expansion. By breaking the run with some T-molding, you've just left yourself with only the 3/8" at the one end.
 

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yes you need to leave expansion joint.

having said that, there is nothing magical about the 30' number. I would go down the hall and leave the t molding at the doors to the bedrooms.:thumbsup:
 

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we are in the same situation and we have come up with the idea of laying everything at a 45 degree angle with smooth transitions between rooms, there is about 5 to 10 percent extra in waste, but the final outcome was spectacular.
 

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yes you need to leave expansion joint.

having said that, there is nothing magical about the 30' number. I would go down the hall and leave the t molding at the doors to the bedrooms.:thumbsup:
:thumbup: I agree. I would not install a transition between main room and hallway.

Diagonal is one way to go, but if you are new at this, be very careful with your layout and starter course.

I do prefer to have hardwood go the length of main rooms, but this layout has a troubling hallway. Yes, bova80, it does look odd. Maybe not to you, but to most people it does. In the OP's layout, I would prefer to have the boards run the length of the hall and live with the board layout to the width in the main room. However, I have done a job or 3 where a layout similar to this had the hallway transition to diagonal boards so that the main room could have the layout longways.

Because your product requires a T-molding transition, you can lay the material in each bedroom the way that best fits your aesthetic. A floating floor doesn't necessarily have to follow the hardwood-perpendicular-to-joists rule.

Jim
 

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:thumbup: I agree. I would not install a transition between main room and hallway.

Diagonal is one way to go, but if you are new at this, be very careful with your layout and starter course.

I do prefer to have hardwood go the length of main rooms, but this layout has a troubling hallway. Yes, bova80, it does look odd. Maybe not to you, but to most people it does. In the OP's layout, I would prefer to have the boards run the length of the hall and live with the board layout to the width in the main room. However, I have done a job or 3 where a layout similar to this had the hallway transition to diagonal boards so that the main room could have the layout longways.

Because your product requires a T-molding transition, you can lay the material in each bedroom the way that best fits your aesthetic. A floating floor doesn't necessarily have to follow the hardwood-perpendicular-to-joists rule.

Jim
would have looked worse if I went the other way, the boards are perpendicular to the joists and a majority of my space is not in the hallway. But whatever works for you.
 

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