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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wife and I just purchased a home and moved in on the 23rd of December. We noticed a stank coming from the ac vents but choked it up to a stagnet unoccupied home in Florida. Boy were we wrong! We traced the smell to the entry way closet where the previous owners stored a very neglected litter box (Gross!! by the front door?). The cats urinated all over the dry wall, carpet, padding, to the concrete and into the 2x4 wall supports. Unfortunately that closet shares a cavity with my HVAC plenum and intake. So when we turn the AC on it circulates throughout the house. I have stripped and cleaned the area, took out a foot of drywall, and removed the urine soaked insulation. The smell is still in the concrete and 2x4s. I have used enzymes, and tried vinegar with baking soda already and it hasn't worked. I need industrial sized help so please do not tell me to use vinegar or enzymes.
 

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In Our new used house, the cat literally urinated or sprayed everywhere, for years, except for the wife’s walk in closet. We tore out every single peice of drywall on the walls, also the engineered wood floors and particle board subfloor. I cut out some exterior wall corners too. Replaced the two glass sliding doors on both sides of the main front door and put windows in. You may need to keep ripping.
Zinsser odor killing primer is your friend, even if you’re not going to finish it.
 

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I used some of this when mice decided to build huge nests in the wall cavities in one of our rentals, really strong urine odor. Took several coats, worked well.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I used some of this when mice decided to build huge nests in the wall cavities in one of our rentals, really strong urine odor. Took several coats, worked well.

Thanks! We have decided to seal everything with that. The only problem is that the Plenum HVAC intake has been soaked as well. Any ideas on how to seal that off? or should we have it replaced, and seal during replacement?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks! We have decided to seal everything with that. The only problem is that the Plenum HVAC intake has been soaked as well. Any ideas on how to seal that off? or should we have it replaced, and seal during replacement?
We have also bough an Ozone Generator to scrub the AC ducts. Any experience with an Ozone Generator?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In Our new used house, the cat literally urinated or sprayed everywhere, for years, except for the wife’s walk in closet. We tore out every single peice of drywall on the walls, also the engineered wood floors and particle board subfloor. I cut out some exterior wall corners too. Replaced the two glass sliding doors on both sides of the main front door and put windows in. You may need to keep ripping.
Zinsser odor killing primer is your friend, even if you’re not going to finish it.

Yeah we are letting the area dry completely and we will apply the sealer.
 

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That was a nice way of putting it. . . neglected cats. So true.
Clean litter and being fixed would have made a difference.
 

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Cat urine is the worst odor to get rid of....on a par with skunk.
I would go to a HVAC business and ask them.
See if anyone guarantees that they can rid you of the odor.
It will go away......but it will take some time.
The ionizer may be the way to go.
 

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I bought a house that had cat odor so bad it made your eyes burn. Wife was actually shocked that I bought it because I’m not really a cat fan. I paid very little for it and remodeled the whole thing. Kiltz worked good for the rooms that I did not replace the Sheetrock in. No matter what I tried sealing on the concrete floors it failed. I went ahead and put ceramic tile on the whole house and that completely wiped it out. I had tried all the enzyme cleaners. Mopped it I don’t know how many times. I don’t remember the sealer I tried but it was glossy afterwards but still did not work. I still have the rental after about 15 years now. I’ve never had issues after we installed the ceramic tiles. Maybe that could work for you as well
 

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I read once that an old solution to skunk smell was tomato juice. I suspect if it kills that odor it would work on just about anything.
If I was desperate enough I would try it.
I would rather my house smell like an Italian restaurant than a pet store.
 

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I agree with everone above....throw everything at it and keep throwing out what you can...no one shot majic eleixar that I know of....

BUT.....Assuming this was a home purchase transacted normally through RE representation, and this was not a disclosure, you should have great financil recourse.

Certainly depends on your state statutes to a degree, but that is a clearly a disclosure issue. You have recourse likely against the selling RE agent and her O and E insurance, and recourse against the seller.

In Colorado....our associates got over $40K in restitution/repair/replace from the agents O and E insurance,(Generally speaking, your easiest/best recourse will be against the insurence of the listing agent...people who live in that filth are likely long gone and unlikely to have resources for recovery..but maybe not)

Good luck....
 

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but choked it up to a stagnet unoccupied home in Florida.
Was that a Freudian slip or just the result of a spell check?
Either way, it seems to fit.
And MTN has a very good suggestion. Full disclosure is important in home sales. Were you told of this circumstance?
 

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I agree with everone above....throw everything at it and keep throwing out what you can...no one shot majic eleixar that I know of....

BUT.....Assuming this was a home purchase transacted normally through RE representation, and this was not a disclosure, you should have great financil recourse.

Certainly depends on your state statutes to a degree, but that is a clearly a disclosure issue. You have recourse likely against the selling RE agent and her O and E insurance, and recourse against the seller.

In Colorado....our associates got over $40K in restitution/repair/replace from the agents O and E insurance,(Generally speaking, your easiest/best recourse will be against the insurence of the listing agent...people who live in that filth are likely long gone and unlikely to have resources for recovery..but maybe not)

Good luck....
But, couldn't they just say you should have smelled it when you saw the house?
 

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If all else fails, you can try a “bake out” also called what I like, a “burn out”. You turn up the heat as far as it goes and leave for a day or two. Then come home and ventilate the place well with fans. Sometimes it helps.
 

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But, couldn't they just say you should have smelled it when you saw the house?
Certainly that could be a defense...the defense is actually that the buyers were aware and knew of the issue...and it's a good defense if indeed the buyers did know of the issue.

I'm assuming that the OP was not aware of the issue for whatever reason.

In our associates/clients case that got $40 K repairs, they had seen the home on a spring day with the windows open...and they truely were unaware of the cats. However, the RE agent had been in the home many times and her insurence did not argue the that she too was unaware.

Furthermore, we had a local vet "testify" (written documentation) that the sellers had at least 6 cats.

In a similar non-disclosure issue, Nancy's buyers moved in and almost immediately had a building drain stoppage. Scoped, it was a broken drain. Chance???...not likely. The buyers immediately had to have it repaired at $7K.

But a few weeks later, the next door kids explained that they were not allowed to flush toilet paper down the seller's toilet when they were over playing with the sellers kids.

Nancy's buyers were not litigious people, but one letter to the sellers had them send a $3500 check to "split" the cost. Nancy's buyers were happy with that. (I would not have been happy with that)
 

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Always have a licensed Home Inspector inspect a home before purchasing- that will usually save much grief and $$$$$. Install an iWave-R in your HVAC and it will destroy odors in the home after remediating the problem. Where I live, it's very humid and my iWave-R prevents mildew from growing in the HVAC ducts and on the underside of the registers. As a side benefit, the literature that accompanies the iWave-R states that it kills pathogens including bacteria and viruses (which includes the Coronavirus family which normally cause colds as well as the strain that causes COVID-19).
 
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