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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Help: Can you name the type of bolt this is? (Resolved)

Hello gang, and thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

I have wooden windows in a 30+ yo house that are secured with bolts to provide safety on the ground floors. However, I have never seen this type of bolt before. I hope to be able to identify it soon so I can get the right tool to removed them, before the painters are complete with my house. :)

The bolt head is mostly round with one side shaved flat. I hope you can see the picture well.

Many thanks,
John

PS-Never mind about the corrosion around it! That's a future project. ;-)
 

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Are you sure that's a bolt and not just a metal rod that can be withdrawn? Maybe corroded in a little? Tried tapping with a hammer to loosen it? Sorry if I'm way off base, I can't really tell much from the pic.
 

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Maybe you can retract it with a magnet.
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hmmmm...I never thought that it could be just a rod. I'll try that. I just assumed it is a bolt of some kind since it is there for security (Not that this fact requires threading) and that the edges look like they have been turned. I also can be off base since I have never seen this before.

I also thought I could try drilling a hole in one and then use a screw extractor to remove it. But the bolt might be too hard to drill into.

I don't know about DannyT's idea (don't think I have the tools for what I think he refers to), but I might be able to use a Dremmel to put in a horizontal cut and use a flat screw driver.

John
 

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The outer ring with the flat spot looks like a hinged grab ring, it should flip up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What you see is what you get. I'm now home from work and going downstairs to work on it, so I'll let you know. But considering that I think this is a thirty year old window and this is original hardware, I think it is a bolt that fits into a threaded sleeve (female end), and it is like a carriage bolt with a different head.
 

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What you see is what you get. I'm now home from work and going downstairs to work on it, so I'll let you know. But considering that I think this is a thirty year old window and this is original hardware, I think it is a bolt that fits into a threaded sleeve (female end), and it is like a carriage bolt with a different head.
Considering that a window is a means of egress in case of fire and that this hardware looks to be original to the window, a threaded bolt would take a good deal of time to take out.
Just saying.
Ron
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, gang... I'd like to say that I used the right tool for the right job, but a pair of needle nose pliers at an almost 90 degree angle and a hard squeeze gave me enough torque to get the bolt moving. Finger strength did the rest.

It looks just like a 2 inch wood screw, but just a head that I've not seen before. I'm guessing these were used 30 years ago?

I should have thought of the needle nose pliers sooner. At the time, I just didn't know how to get them out. (And of course I started with the two windows that were the toughest to get out!)

Anyways, thanks very much for offering your advice. Pic included.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good point, Ron! This is the first time in our 'new' house that I have attempted to open the windows, so I didn't even realize how difficult. That they were hard to get open is a point well taken. I still want the security (there are other security factors in place as well), but I better look at getting something that can be removed very quickly.

John
 

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Originally the bolt came with a "T" shaped wrench with a socket on the end to remove the bolt. Almost like a faucet key, just a little bigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here is my basement window with one of the screws removed (not that you can see that level of detail in the pic). It is an older wooden slide window. You should be able to see a black dot on the left side where the two slides meet. That is where the screw is located, and there because it prevents them from sliding when the screw is installed.

I suppose that is important for security because otherwise the simple window lock can easily be unlocked and the window quietly opened. I also have window break sensors around all of the windows in case someone decides just to put a foot through. They are remarkable sensitive.

John
 

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"maintenance 6" is correct. These were a type of "burglar protection device". These did not come with the windows, they were available at local hardware stores and such. Once installed they prevented burglar's from just opening the windows from the outside. The key(s) were to be place near certain windows so one could get out of the locked house in case of a fire. But in reality it would take longer to remember which window(s) had the key(s), then figure out how to use the key to remove the bolt/screw, then it would to just use your key to unlock the front door. One popular variation of this was people would drill a hole through both window sashes and use a duplex headed nail.
 
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