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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 12x16 heavy shed. It's heavy as instead of being made with plywood/2x4s the entire wall construction was created using 2x6s (plus the door and three windows, standard truss with shingled roof). Around the base of the shed (where the walls sit) are 4x4s.

I need to move this shed 5-6 feet in one direction.

My original plan was to jack the shed up (using a hydraulic car jack, 2.5 ton), block it, slide a few 2x4s under it, then use some old cut plumbing pipes as rollers. Once on the rollers, pull it the required distance with a truck.

As with most things, it sounds easy, but now I just want to drink and forget about the entire thing.

I dug a hole, put my jack in the hole (2x4 below the jack, as not to sink), that fit fine ... started to jack it up, and quickly discovered that the 4x4 base was crumbling/rotting. It did not offer the support needed to jack up one corner. I backed off the jack (as not to destroy the 4x4, as the jack was eating into it).

I'm open to suggestions on how exactly I can get this shed up a few inches to slide the 2x4s under it. How would the professional movers go about doing this?

The only thing that comes to mind is placing a block of wood on the jack head (between the jack and the 4x4 of the shed), to give it a little bit more foundation when jacking it up - but I have serious doubts about this as well.

Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
To expand on the construction, there is a floor (treated plywood). The floor joists are again 2x6s that run across the bottom. I estimate the weight to be 3-4 ton in total.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Try to get a piece of Channel Iron about 2 feet long, and wide enough to cradle your 4X4 .

Center this between your jack head and the wood to distribute the force over a larger area.

Then proceed as you planned.


ED
 

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while its possible that that area is the only rot. my bet is that all//most of it is rotted. you need to inspect more. you may need to jack the whole thing up, but not from the bottom. in order to make repairs, before moving it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
while its possible that that area is the only rot. my bet is that all//most of it is rotted. you need to inspect more. you may need to jack the whole thing up, but not from the bottom. in order to make repairs, before moving it.
I ended up screwing on a 2x6 to the 2x6 siding (bottom board), hanging off the edges by a foot ... then I used my jack to lift each side. Due to the position of the jack, I was only able to get it out of the ground by about an inch (some spots remain in the ground), and I blocked it at the corners. So there is some good news, at-least the thing is moving up.

For the rot, the front and back are pretty shot, but the sides appear intact (which is what I would be rolling it on). I figure I need to go no less than 5" higher from where it sits right now, block it off and place my boards under it.

There is something called "moving rollers" that appear to be made just for this purpose. Essentially a roller skate (more or less) that sits sandwiched between the board and the structure, that would roll forward. However it seems impossible to find a place to rent these (and they are high priced, for something I'd never use again).

One of my two hydraulic jacks died on me, which is going to make lowering the shed back down onto my "pipe rollers" (just cut old plumbing) insanely difficult, as each side will have to be lowered independently. I guess I'll tackle that when I get to it... First I need to go higher, a lot higher..

I really dislike this project. If I didn't need the storage space I wouldn't mind seeing this shed burn.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I use 2, farm jacks to lift it one side at a time and 3" PVC pipe as rollers.
http://www.harborfreight.com/42-inch-3-1-2-half-ton-farm-jack-6530.html
That seems like the right way to do it. My only fear on that is that this shed weighs a ton (compared to the average construction). The hi lift jacks have such a narrow head and base, I'd fear it would slip, or chew into the wood siding.

It also does not help that the siding is not all one length. For example, I figure the shed is 14-16' long, instead of using a single 2x6 cut to length, there are two and at times three of them in there. Essentially built from scrap wood to make things fit. It's a real mess.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'll try to take a few pictures and get them here. I think with seeing what I'm having to do, more people will chime in with some suggestions.
 

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Instead of pulling it with your truck, use your truck as an anchor point and use a truck strap or come-a-long to pull the shed. You will have more control of the moving shed.

Also, once you get the shed high enough to insert a 2 by 6 on the flat under the shed, install the 2 x 6 at the jacking points to spread the weight over several joists.
 
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