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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if the 4" heavy duty cast iron castors from Harbor Freight would work on a roll around for a unisaw base. I have small castors on the base now but it would take a truck to push it around.

If the HF castors won't work does anyone have any suggestions?
 

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I've used the rubber tire HF casters under some extremely heavy loads and they have worked well--the iron ones should do well for that saw--

I have them under an antique grand piano (hobby fixer upper) they work just fine---Mike---
 

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For the money they are really good---I use them for tile dollies,too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For the money they are really good---I use them for tile dollies,too.
I hope to be able to make all the tools in the shop on wheels. My shop now is so small you can't cuss a cat without getting fur in your mouth and I figure if I make it so I can roll everything around it will make it a lot easier.

Sometimes I wish my Unisaw was shorter but I just can't bring myself to cut it down, so maybe with good castors I can move it out of the way when not using.
 

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Wheels under the tools sound like a plan---I don't know about rolling around a saw---I spend good money for wheels under mine--and it has never been moved since the day I set it up.

I have a big un'. 7 feet wide and almost 7 feet across---(Young folks--big is better --)--Mike--
 

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After thinking out loud one day, a few buddy's told me that it would never work, but I have had my old Coats tire changer on casters for 10-15 years now, and it works great. Obviously not the same thing, but somewhat comparable when you consider the pushing, pulling, turning, etc. that goes on. Currently, my table saw is setting on a solid 2x4 frame with a dust collector, shelves, hook, etc. that I rather hastily put together a good many years ago. I have a set of steel wheels on the front that miss the floor by about 1/8", so to move it I have a slot over the dust catcher where I slide a 2x4 in, and when I lift up the back, the wheels touch the floor, so I can roll it like a one handled wheel barrow. Fortunately, I don't have to move it a lot, but often enough that I have decided it's too much work, so I have just recently started laying out a new cabinet, with 4 casters, which I plan to finish over the winter. Like you, Jim, I'm going for as many things on casters as I can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good gravy Mike, you do have a huge saw, I thought mine was big but it is just wide. At one time I had a shop 50'X100' now that I retired I have 12'X18", I need to do something, I can't move around out there.

Dexter, that is good thinking the way you fixed up your machine, I wish I could fix mine that way but I am just not strong enough anymore to move it like that.

I want to put wheels as big as I can so it will roll over things on the floor. I sold both of my dust collectors so there is dust on the floor a lot. That is one thing I wish I hadn't sold but there just wasn't room in the shop for one of them. I appreciate y'alls help a lot.
 

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You sure do need everything on wheels. And hopefully a paved area in front of the building.
I think those casters will roll over the crumbs---a small dust system might be a good idea.



My saw has a 54" rip fence --plus and extra extension on the left--and a 4 x 7 outfeed table.

About the size of a king size bed---
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You sure do need everything on wheels. And hopefully a paved area in front of the building.
I think those casters will roll over the crumbs---a small dust system might be a good idea.



My saw has a 54" rip fence --plus and extra extension on the left--and a 4 x 7 outfeed table.

About the size of a king size bed---
Good gravy Mike that is about the size of my shop.:) I have the 54 inch rip fence on my saw also and with the miter saw at the end of the table saw against the wall there is just enough room to squeeze by I can't rip a sheet of plywood in half the long way on the table saw, well I couldn't even if I had the room, handling full sheets of plywood are over for me.

I see some of the fellows shops on the board here and drool, I love the way they have their shops set up, hopefully I can set mine up like that. Believe it or not, I have built full sets of kitchen cabinets in that small shop, wasn't easy but doable.
 

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So many people end up doing nothing because they don't have 'the ideal' set up.

I've made some mighty fancy stuff over the years with all the wrong tools--

I made so many raised panels on a job sight router table that I wore a grove into the sheet of particle board.

The tools don't make the craftsman--that's for sure---
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So many people end up doing nothing because they don't have 'the ideal' set up.

I've made some mighty fancy stuff over the years with all the wrong tools--

I made so many raised panels on a job sight router table that I wore a grove into the sheet of particle board.

The tools don't make the craftsman--that's for sure---
I totally agree Mike, there are many who won't do anything because everything is just not perfect. That is a profound statement, "The tools don't make the craftsman" and so true. You should have seen some of the tools we used way back when starting into wood working, I didn't even know what a router was and there weren't electric miter saws, we got it done though. I bet some folks would turn their nose up at someone running base and shoe with a skill saw, square and coping saw. It is just as neat and a whole lot faster than using a miter saw, if you know how to do it.

Back when we were doing business wide open, there wasn't time to stop and build a router table. I took a piece of 3/4 plywood and bought a 1/4 piece of aluminum and made a set up that I could just clamp to a table or anything stable. I did have to add 1X6 to the bottom to stiffen the plywood up but it worked and I still have it and use it. I just never got around to building a nice router table.
 

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I watched a carpenter screw a Skill Saw to the bottom of a sheet of plywood to make a quick 'table saw' once---worked just fine--

I learned trim with a miter box and back saw---hammer,nails and a punch--It's what every one did .

I was drilling and hand nailing maple stair treads the day another carpenter dragged over a hose and said," Here give this a try. You might like it."

Nail guns!!! Oh,boy what an invention!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I watched a carpenter screw a Skill Saw to the bottom of a sheet of plywood to make a quick 'table saw' once---worked just fine--

I learned trim with a miter box and back saw---hammer,nails and a punch--It's what every one did .

I was drilling and hand nailing maple stair treads the day another carpenter dragged over a hose and said," Here give this a try. You might like it."

Nail guns!!! Oh,boy what an invention!!!
Those were some good ole miter saws and accurate, you made sure you cut the trim right the first time though. Back when I was 27 years old I contracted a house and all the doors were knock down, I was mortising the hinges with a chisel, one of my hands told me he would borrow a friend of his router and hing jig. He showed me how to use it and I was in love with that set up. I bought one and cut my door hanging time to almost nothing. They still make that same hing jig today. I still have one of the old Stanley routers with the rounded top, they made a reproduction of it for sale a few years ago.
 

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I got my first router in exchange for doing some work---I've loved routers ever since.

They are a magic tool that turns plain into fancy---

I carry two cases filled with bits to every trim job---Those boxes make a guy look like a wizard to the customer---
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I got my first router in exchange for doing some work---I've loved routers ever since.

They are a magic tool that turns plain into fancy---

I carry two cases filled with bits to every trim job---Those boxes make a guy look like a wizard to the customer---
How do you keep your bits separated Mike?
 

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Simple--the boxes are those under the pick-up truck seat boxes (about the size of a saws all case)

I just cut several 3/4" oak boards to cover the bottom of the boxes--drilled a bunch of holes 9/16"

Added some thick foam rubber to the inside of the lid---done---

Bits into the holes--foam keeps them there--there is enough room for a guide--trammel--wrenches--

The box looked pretty big and empty when I made it--now there are two---Mike---
 
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