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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in the Dallas area. I was thinking on switching to a heat radiator and not depending on HVAC. I recently came from Europe and I had one of those radiator in my room. It felt nice and toasty. Just loved it. I notice places up north have them in the US. Can anyone help me find company in Texas that install or work with them?
 

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You would have to change your whole heating system. This is a hydronic heating system where the heat is supplied by hot water or possibly steam.

If you have an open basement or crawl space and a 1 floor house, it would be a relatively easy swap, just expensive as you would need to add a heat source, like a boiler. and run all new piping to each radiator.

Check with any plumber who does HVAC, or pretty much any HVAC and say that you want hydronic radiant heat.

And be prepared for a big bill.
 

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Do you have hydronic heating now?
Dallas doesn’t have a lot of basements. And is primarily a cooling climate. You’ll still need forced air cooling in that area and the ROI wouldn’t not be there for installing a hydronic heating system.
Hydronic heating isn’t near as popular in the US as it is in other countries. And the areas you see it are primarily to the north/northeast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
no i dont have any hydronic is a old home. and the only A/C it currently has is the one you hang out from the window. im going to tear down the old walls off and add a mini split i like them a lot more compare to the HVAC. but i figure the cold season is what need is a radiator from my experience with them in Ukraine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You would have to change your whole heating system. This is a hydronic heating system where the heat is supplied by hot water or possibly steam.

If you have an open basement or crawl space and a 1 floor house, it would be a relatively easy swap, just expensive as you would need to add a heat source, like a boiler. and run all new piping to each radiator.

Check with any plumber who does HVAC, or pretty much any HVAC and say that you want hydronic radiant heat.

And be prepared for a big bill.



Thank i will find a local HVAC place and make some calls see if they do this kind of service.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
?? well if any one know a tech in Dallas let me know or send a links this would be helpful get a expert to take a look at my home.
 

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Talk to your friends, family or coworkers. See if anyone comes recommended.
A minisplit heat pump could easily heat your home.
You’ll need someone that greatly understands hydronics, not so easy in the US especially in a cooling heavy market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well that one reasons why i came on here not every one would know this. again texas is know for HVAC not radiators im sure someone or few hand full of people might have a radiators in their homes
 

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Electric panel heaters are available.
 

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Hydronic is a total waste of money in texas.

If I had to guess at cost, i would say $20 to $30k+ for a system used a few weeks at most each year.

Stay away from straight electric - costs too much to run.

Can put in a mini-split heatpump system and be done with it. One outdoor unit connected to multiple heads.

They heat very efficiently in mild climates.

Get rid of the crappy window units and get heat as well - kill two birds with one stone.

Don't do convenctional forced air unless the air ducts don't have to be in a hot attic.



You can also look at gas wall furnaces if you don't like forced air style heating systems.
 

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Hydronic is a total waste of money in texas.

If I had to guess at cost, i would say $20 to $30k+ for a system used a few weeks at most each year.

Stay away from straight electric - costs too much to run.

Put in a mini-split heatpump system and be done with it. One outdoor unit connected to multiple heads.

Get rid of the crappy window units and get heat as well - kill two birds with one stone.

They heat very efficiently in mild climates.

You can also look at gas wall furnaces if you don't like forced air style heating systems.
Agreed.
 

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Electric panel heaters are available.
These will cost a substantial amount of money to run. And will not give you a radiator effect.
The trouble is hydronic radiators are very popular in Europe, but are seen as old technology in the United States.
The hydronic heating we do have is usually baseboard radiators or hydronic coils in air handlers.
Add to that, your climate in Texas is primarily cooling.
I would estimate you’d have at least $20,000 installing a fully functional hydronic radiator system. Likely more. Add to that the cost of an air conditioning system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hydronic is a total waste of money in texas.

If I had to guess at cost, i would say $20 to $30k+ for a system used a few weeks at most each year.

Stay away from straight electric - costs too much to run.

Can put in a mini-split heatpump system and be done with it. One outdoor unit connected to multiple heads.

They heat very efficiently in mild climates.

Get rid of the crappy window units and get heat as well - kill two birds with one stone.

Don't do convenctional forced air unless the air ducts don't have to be in a hot attic.



You can also look at gas wall furnaces if you don't like forced air style heating systems.



thanks for the straight to the point answer. i will get a mini split with a heat pump. my home is tiny only one bathroom and two rooms. i think i might as well do it that way. i could add the convection heater if it not enough in the cold season. trail and error.
 

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thanks for the straight to the point answer. i will get a mini split with a heat pump. my home is tiny only one bathroom and two rooms. i think i might as well do it that way. i could add the convection heater if it not enough in the cold season. trail and error.
Doesn’t have to be trial and error at all. Make sure an accurate AHRI load calculation is done. You’ll know exactly what’s needed to heat and cool the home. Could do the whole thing with a ducted minisplit.
I’m not certain how long you’ve been in Texas. But the climate there isn’t very cold.
 

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Heat pump mini splits would be perfect. But if you only use heat for a couple of weeks per year, electric resistance heat shouldn’t break the bank.
 
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