DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This isn't quite an "electrical" question but this seems like the closest match.

I'm in the process of fully wiring up data ports all over my house. CAT6 everywhere, a few COAX where needed. And I also plan on doing a few specific HDMI runs. In a bedroom, one from where the TV is going on the wall, to where the nightstand will be, so I can easily connect a game system or a laptop or anything like that to the TV, without wires running everywhere.

In the living room, I'm doing something similar, but with 3 HDMIs. They'll all go from a spot that will be next to the couch, down into the basement, then up into the wall, and to a spot behind where the living room TV will be.

Everything is keystone, and I have all the plates, jacks, channel routing, a map of the whole system. Everything else I'm running is coming together nicely, but I'm very apprehensive about the HDMI! I'm starting with the bedroom run. It needs to be 26', so figure 30'. I've used 30' HDMI cables before, they are very thick and difficult to work with. And the ends are massive. Squeezing even one, never mind three, of these cables through a data box, curving the wire down to go through the wall seems practically impossible. Not only that, these long HDMI cables are VERY expensive. So trial and error isn't a great way to go.

Someone told me about HDMI over CAT6, and at first that seemed like the perfect solution! I've been running CAT6 all day, running that is easy, I can put it anywhere, using 2 of them per one HDMI is no big deal, my data channels have plenty of space. But as I read in to it more, it seems they don't support the bandwidth or quality that a real HDMI cable will.

Another thought I had was to use relatively thin, relatively flexible HDMI extension cables at each end, in the wall. So the thick 30 or 25 foot cable would go most of the route, and each cable would plug into a 12" or less extension cable, and that much thiner, much smaller end would plug into the back of the keystone jack. That seems plausible anyway. Monoprice doesn't have extension cables under 3' though. Plus I don't know if there are any issues/limits with number of HDMI connections, beyond the overall length of all of the cables. ALSO I'd hate to have one of these in-wall plugs fall out a year from now. That would ruin my day!


I feel like running in-wall HDMI cables can't be THAT uncommon. Especially in those big, fancy houses. People must do it often enough that these problems must have been solved. But I'm not finding any good solutions for my relatively small house. What makes it worse is that one end of the living room's 3 ethernet cables are going on an external wall, so there's insulation to deal with. I may end up using an external wall mount box for those ones or at least a spacer, so I don't have to have an uninsulated spot.

Also here's the full map of my data network. HDMI is in orange:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
if you havent already purchased the HDMI cables, check with www.monoprice.com - I bought some really good ones very cheap. you can get long as you want, for not much $$. as far as getting the heads in the box, do them one at a time. alot easier...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I haven't bought them yet, and I do buy most of my stuff from monoprice. But that doesn't solve my issues at all. Long HDMIs are super thick and have very large heads. They don't seem to have any solutions to the problem. I've seen things elsewhere like HDMI keystone jacks that are little dongles, that could help a lot. They don't have those on monoprice though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
To carry 4K HDR at 60 fps you need approx 8Gbps(18 limit for hdmi2.0)
I don't even think extender or some adapters even exists.

Your cables(I think, because hard to find long cable for 4K) are already out of current HDMI specs. And you want to make out dated wiring?


1080p will work fine over Cat 6 without quality loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
When I replaced my old front projector with a new model that had HDMI inputs, I bought a 50' run of Monoprice "Redmere" HDMI cable. I've never had a problem with the length of this run and they are relatively thin and flexible. These are the cables I bought (see pic).
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I recommend you to discuss HDMI cable at special audio-video forums.
Let me copy one answer from Amazon from blue Ruger cable(link above)
I bought the 50ft and returned it. HDMI is 1.4 @ 50ft. So 4k at 30hx. It's frustrating that the description doesn't change when you select 50ft. Only way to get HDMI 2.0, A, B at 50ft is HDMI optical. I'm using RUIPRO HDMI Fiber Cable HDMI 2.0b @ 65ft. Works great with GTX 980 to TCL 55605 TV. Make sure you get the 2.0b as it can do HDR also.



Just search RUIPRO HDMI Fiber Cable - $200 for 65'. Nice price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I recommend you to discuss HDMI cable at special audio-video forums.
Let me copy one answer from Amazon from blue Ruger cable(link above)
I bought the 50ft and returned it. HDMI is 1.4 @ 50ft. So 4k at 30hx. It's frustrating that the description doesn't change when you select 50ft. Only way to get HDMI 2.0, A, B at 50ft is HDMI optical. I'm using RUIPRO HDMI Fiber Cable HDMI 2.0b @ 65ft. Works great with GTX 980 to TCL 55605 TV. Make sure you get the 2.0b as it can do HDR also.



Just search RUIPRO HDMI Fiber Cable - $200 for 65'. Nice price.
wow, did not know that, thanks for the info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
In the living room, I'm doing something similar, but with 3 HDMIs. They'll all go from a spot that will be next to the couch, down into the basement, then up into the wall, and to a spot behind where the living room TV will be.

Someone told me about HDMI over CAT6, and at first that seemed like the perfect solution! I've been running CAT6 all day, running that is easy, I can put it anywhere, using 2 of them per one HDMI is no big deal, my data channels have plenty of space. But as I read in to it more, it seems they don't support the bandwidth or quality that a real HDMI cable will.
Whether you use HDMI cable or "HDMI over Cat6", why not use a "switcher" at the source. Then you would need only one HDMI connection, however made, instead of three in the Living Room?

(As it happens, I am using one of these (https://www.ebay.com/itm/1080p-HDMI...hash=item3ac24e18ce:m:maqEE83tnAtPqC0zTgOzTVg) for HDMI over Cat6 over a distance of about 30 metres - with no problems.
Also, I am using a 4x2 HDMI Matrix Switch Splitter - similar to this https://www.ebay.com/itm/4k-x-2K-HD...693480?hash=item3f777e1da8:g:yY4AAOSwFqNZTiyI, but that is another story.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
First link is for 1080p
Second HDMI 1.4 not 2.0
All of this outdated
My main intention was to make the comment:-
Whether you use HDMI cable or "HDMI over Cat6", why not use a "switcher" at the source. Then you would need only one HDMI connection, however made, instead of three in the Living Room?
The references were simply illustrative.
This equipment works quite well with our three TVs, plus the PVRs and Blu Ray players involved which, no doubt, are also outdated.

I see no real need to replace things simply because devices with higher specifications become available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The post-turkey festivities yesterday had a good demonstration of what I'm trying to avoid. This was at my uncles house, not mine. But this kind of mess is something I don't want to deal with.



So I was eventually able to find some 90° hdmi keystone jacks with the ports at the right angle, and with the inside portion extended a bit to make room. This won't let me put more than one in a column, but if I switch to an 8 port, 2 gang keystone plate, I can do the three HDMI's next to each other with these plugs and it should work pretty well. I haven't actually ordered anything yet, just searching and planing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top