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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I'm hoping one of you can fill me in with some experience you might have had with this scenario. This is the first plug-in light I've ever attempted to hardwire, and I was sure it'd only be a quick cut and stripping/connecting of the wires but the LED comes with an LED driver and switch. I'm not sure if I can simply just make the cut as to include the switch and driver since from what I've the LED driver helps maintain a proper power flow as to not overheat the LEDs.

Any help is appreciated!

Thanks!:smile:
 

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You first need to know it's not legal to do what you are doing. You destroy the url rating by cutting any part of the cord which comes with and the part which needs to be left on (the part between the driver and led) is not rated to be used inside a wall cavity.

Having made you aware of that though... you need the driver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You first need to know it's not legal to do what you are doing. You destroy the url rating by cutting any part of the cord which comes with and the part which needs to be left on (the part between the driver and led) is not rated to be used inside a wall cavity.

Having made you aware of that though... you need the driver.
So I'm guessing overall it's not a great idea then? I wasn't planning to house it inside a wall...just on top of a bathroom mirror (someone purchased the wrong light fixture, and at this point we can't return it:plain:). By now it's probably obvious that I'm not really well aware of how the driver is regulating the power to prevent overheating (or why, since since screw in bulbs don't seem to have this same system). So with that said, is the driver always drawing electricity when left plugged in?
 

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So I'm guessing overall it's not a great idea then? I wasn't planning to house it inside a wall...just on top of a bathroom mirror (someone purchased the wrong light fixture, and at this point we can't return it:plain:). By now it's probably obvious that I'm not really well aware of how the driver is regulating the power to prevent overheating (or why, since since screw in bulbs don't seem to have this same system). So with that said, is the driver always drawing electricity when left plugged in?
The driver is lowering the voltage for the LEDs which run at a much lower voltage and power than old-fashioned screw-in bulbs did. In addition, it's converting the alternating current to direct current, necessary for LED operation. It draws no current when the LEDs are off. What you have is a portable lamp, it cannot be installed as a replacement for a permanently wired fixture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The driver is lowering the voltage for the LEDs which run at a much lower voltage and power than old-fashioned screw-in bulbs did. In addition, it's converting the alternating current to direct current, necessary for LED operation. It draws no current when the LEDs are off. What you have is a portable lamp, it cannot be installed as a replacement for a permanently wired fixture.
So I won't be attempting this now, but is there any particular reason that this wouldn't work out?
 

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That light is built the way it is, so a homeowner or apt occupant can mount it and plug it in.

If it was a hardwire design, officially you would need an Elektriker to install it for you.
 

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So I won't be attempting this now, but is there any particular reason that this wouldn't work out?
It's a portable cord and plug connected lamp, not suitable or legal to permanently wire into a structure.

I explained that in my first post,
What you have is a portable lamp, it cannot be installed as a replacement for a permanently wired fixture
Another poster Bob Sanders said
You first need to know it's not legal to do what you are doing.
which you conveniently glazed over and ignored, so whatever dude - the project is yours to f-up since it's obvious you're going to do whatever you want anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It's a portable cord and plug connected lamp, not suitable or legal to permanently wire into a structure.

I explained that in my first post,

Another poster Bob Sanders said
which you conveniently glazed over and ignored, so whatever dude - the project is yours to f-up since it's obvious you're going to do whatever you want anyway.
I'm not exactly sure how you can come to the conclusion that I've "glazed over and ignored" any posts in this thread or that it's "obvious [I'm] going to do whatever want anyway". Actually it's quite ironic that you could make such a criticism while simultaneously glazing over the fact that I said I wouldn't be attempting this project.

So anyway, back to the point of my question...I'd heard of this being done before, so when someone then tells me that it's illegal and won't work I'm not doubting the answer but rather the technical reason. Can you also clarify a bit and tell me if this means hardwiring any plug-ins is illegal?
 

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...I'd heard of this being done before, so when someone then tells me that it's illegal and won't work I'm not doubting the answer but rather the technical reason. Can you also clarify a bit and tell me if this means hardwiring any plug-ins is illegal?
Since most of us are not in that country, citing the correct local codes will be challenging. The plug itself is part of any safety listing.

Cheers!
 

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I'm not exactly sure how you can come to the conclusion that I've "glazed over and ignored" any posts in this thread or that it's "obvious [I'm] going to do whatever want anyway". Actually it's quite ironic that you could make such a criticism while simultaneously glazing over the fact that I said I wouldn't be attempting this project.


No, you said "so I won't be attempting this now." Then asked if there's any particular reason it wouldn't work out.

So anyway, back to the point of my question...I'd heard of this being done before, so when someone then tells me that it's illegal and won't work I'm not doubting the answer but rather the technical reason.
Right. You're hell bent on doing what you're going to do, unless someone, somehow has the ability to get it through your thick skull to convince you otherwise. And now that you've heard "someone else did it" well, what more do you need and why can't you do it too?

Portable lamps, such as the one you have, are not built to the same standards as fixtures designed for hard wiring. When you physically alter an electrical device you violate it's listing. A hard wired portable lamp is not listed for permanent mounting. You are also violating it's instructions.

Can you also clarify a bit and tell me if this means hardwiring any plug-ins is illegal?
It is always illegal to use an electrical device in a manner not intended by the manufacturer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It's a portable cord and plug connected lamp, not suitable or legal to permanently wire into a structure.

I explained that in my first post,

Another poster Bob Sanders said
which you conveniently glazed over and ignored, so whatever dude - the project is yours to f-up since it's obvious you're going to do whatever you want anyway.
No, you said "so I won't be attempting this now." Then asked if there's any particular reason it wouldn't work out.



Right. You're hell bent on doing what you're going to do, unless someone, somehow has the ability to get it through your thick skull to convince you otherwise. And now that you've heard "someone else did it" well, what more do you need and why can't you do it too?

Portable lamps, such as the one you have, are not built to the same standards as fixtures designed for hard wiring. When you physically alter an electrical device you violate it's listing. A hard wired portable lamp is not listed for permanent mounting. You are also violating it's instructions.



It is always illegal to use an electrical device in a manner not intended by the manufacturer.
I'm still perplexed as to why you think I'm not all ears, and more so by your overly-dramatic hostility:surprise:. If I was hellbent on doing this project, it would have been quite illogical for me to come to a forum and wait patiently for answers, which I subsequently accepted as being valid (also illogical for someone hellbent on doing something to accept any reasoning whatsoever). Again, I was only looking for a more technical reason, which I guess doesn't go any further than it not being "built to the same standards as fixtures designed for hard wiring".
 

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So anyway, back to the point of my question...I'd heard of this being done before, so when someone then tells me that it's illegal and won't work I'm not doubting the answer but rather the technical reason. Can you also clarify a bit and tell me if this means hardwiring any plug-ins is illegal?
I'm not sure anyone said it won't work. What has been said is that is illegal.
If you clearly understand it is illegal and wish to do it anyway then it is on you. It simply would not be responsible for people here NOT to tell you it's illegal if they have such knowledge.

Yes... altering anything electrical and using it in a way which is contrary to how the manufacturer intended it to be used, is indeed illegal.

Now I'm not your mother, your boss, or your electrical inspector so I won't tell you that you can't do it or it won't work. If you decide in spite of the warnings given to you that you wanna do it anyway, then the driver can not be cut out. It must be used otherwise you will blow the crap out of the light about 1 micro second after you throw the switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Since most of us are not in that country, citing the correct local codes will be challenging. The plug itself is part of any safety listing.

Cheers!
Just to be clear, I'm not attempting this project (therefore I'm not so interested in the legality, since it won't be attempted). However, I'm still interested in how/why the standards for plug-in wires differ from those in devices meant to be hardwired. If they both have to receive the same power, why would one be so drastically different from another?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm not sure anyone said it won't work. What has been said is that is illegal.
If you clearly understand it is illegal and wish to do it anyway then it is on you. It simply would not be responsible for people here NOT to tell you it's illegal if they have such knowledge.

Yes... altering anything electrical and using it in a way which is contrary to how the manufacturer intended it to be used, is indeed illegal.

Now I'm not your mother, your boss, or your electrical inspector so I won't tell you that you can't do it or it won't work. If you decide in spite of the warnings given to you that you wanna do it anyway, then the driver can not be cut out. It must be used otherwise you will blow the crap out of the light about 1 micro second after you throw the switch.
I appreciate your concern, and again as I've mentioned before I am NOT doing this project. Before I posted here, I was under the impression that hardwiring plug-in lights was quite a routine procedure.
 
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