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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The house I purchased has a Hardie 6 Station Total Control system that I'm trying to understand. The previous homeowner is of no help. From my research, I've concluded that it's an irrigation system. Found a user manual online, but doesn't answer my main questions. Maybe someone could help.

1. What do the electrical wires coming off the control box control. There are several in a conduit that lead into the ground, but I've found no sprinkler heads in the yard. What should I be looking for.

2. There's a Hunter I20 ADV on/off device screwed onto a pvc pipe 3 feet off the ground and 30 yards from the Hardie controller. Looks like it's operated by water pressure. What does this do.

3. What is the typical water source for these systems; the homes exterior water spigots?

4. I assumed there was a shallow well on site (in Va Beach area) because there's a pump that clearly was connected below the control box. However, the pump's suction side appeared to be connected to a 1.25" pvc pipe extends vertically in the ground for 2 feet then turns 90 degrees. The disrcharge side of the pump has 3/4" or 1" black flexible tubing that appears to run shallow underground to the back of the house. I'm baffled.

Thanks
 

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1) The wires typically will go to a valve box that contains valves for the sprinkler heads. The cover could be buried or visible. You could have one or multiple boxes.

2) The ADV is a sprinkler head called a rotor.
http://www.evergreensprinklers.com/...inkler-rotor-w_plastic-riser-check-valve.html

3) The water source is could be a direct connection to your house water or a well.

4) Follow the black poly pipe to the house. It probably will lead you to a valve box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I did a quick test to see if I could learn more and find some sprinkler heads. The test involved connecting water hose to the 1.25" pvc pipe that's under the controller, then to the poly pipe that's also under the controller. The pump which connected those two pipes was removed when I bought the house. Water didn't daylight during either test. I'm guessing that the 1.25" pvc pipe was the supply to the pump (from somewhere, maybe the front spigot) which sent water to the back of the house via the poly pipe. After the test I thought that maybe I didn't see any sprinkler heads because the controller wasn't turned on. Not sure if that mattered. I did find some broken 1/4' pvc pipe in the flower bed behind the house. I suspect that's part of the system.
 

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I thought that maybe I didn't see any sprinkler heads because the controller wasn't turned on. Not sure if that mattered .
Yes, the controller not only needs to be turned on, but you need to "manually run one zone" or "manually sequence all zones". Typically, you don't have enough water supply to run all the zones at the same time, so there is a solenoid for ever 3-6 sprinkler heads--- a zone. The controller turns on one zone at a time. So first you need to supply water pressure to the solenoids, then you need to turn them on. If you think you have it figured out, but then the zone does not turn on, try the next zone --- those solenoids are notorious for broken wires and other issues-- you could have at least one buggered solenoid.

Around here a sprinkler system is normally hard-piped to the house supply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, the controller not only needs to be turned on, but you need to "manually run one zone" or "manually sequence all zones". Typically, you don't have enough water supply to run all the zones at the same time, so there is a solenoid for ever 3-6 sprinkler heads--- a zone. The controller turns on one zone at a time. So first you need to supply water pressure to the solenoids, then you need to turn them on. If you think you have it figured out, but then the zone does not turn on, try the next zone --- those solenoids are notorious for broken wires and other issues-- you could have at least one buggered solenoid.

Around here a sprinkler system is normally hard-piped to the house supply.
1) The wires typically will go to a valve box that contains valves for the sprinkler heads. The cover could be buried or visible. You could have one or multiple boxes.

2) The ADV is a sprinkler head called a rotor.
http://www.evergreensprinklers.com/...inkler-rotor-w_plastic-riser-check-valve.html

3) The water source is could be a direct connection to your house water or a well.

4) Follow the black poly pipe to the house. It probably will lead you to a valve box.
I ran another test on the old sprinkler system. Connected water hose to the poly pipe beneath the control box (where the pump would normally set) and turned on controller to manual. Found two "working" sprinkler heads. I'm guessing there should be another two based on the wiring behind the control panel. Wouldit make sense to have the control box with the solenoid valves close to the control panel, or are they located near each sprinkler head.

Also, what's the purpose of the "valve common switch" on upper left of control panel.

Untitled by Larry Johnson, on Flickr
 

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That's good you found two working sprinkler heads. Now you need to find the solenoid box. Its going to be close to the sprinkler heads to minimize piping. Only 4 solenoids --- I would be expecting to find them all in one box.

If you find the solenoid box, you can manually actuate the solenoid valve, to prove water can flow. Typically, you rotate the solenoid or something like that to actuate it, but really you need to determine the model of solenoid, then google how to manually actuate it.

Don't know what the "valve common switch" is. The markings below it say "sensor / bypass" which I would guess is for a rain sensor. Sometimes systems have a rain sensor so that you are not watering during rain. You have nothing hooked up to "sensor" inputs, so you don't have a rain sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thanks for the help and info.
I'm actually more interested in figuring out how/where to turn on the suspected water supply than getting the sprinkler system working. Watering the lawn just means more mowing.

re: water supply line. I also "tested" it yesterday by putting garden hose in it at the (sprinkler pump llocation) and running water through it for 10 minutes. Didn't see water daylight anywhere and no water came back up and out of the pipe. Any thoughts about this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can you post some pics of your setup?
It's described in item 4 of my initial post. There's a 1.25" pvc pipe coming out of the ground that connected to a pump. There's a black poly pipe sticking out of the ground that connected to the discharge side of the pump. Control panel pictured is above the pump. What do you want to see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Some pics of the pump and piping might provide some insight.
I'm skeptical, but I'll play along. The pump was in the shed when I purchased the house. The inlet of the pump is the same height as the pvc pipe coming out of the ground when it had an elbow and union on it. I concluded, that's where the pump went. I cut the pvc so I could look down and measure. It appears to turn under the driveway (where I was standing) about 18" below ground. I dug down, but didn't find it. The scattered bricks are extras that I recently placed there.

There was no indication that the pump was connected to the control panel. It received power from outlet nearby.

Untitled by Larry Johnson, on Flickr

Untitled by Larry Johnson, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Put the inlet piping back together, prime the pump and see if it starts pulling water. I don't see a relay to control the pump in the panel. Just plug the pump into a 120V receptacle.
Dan,

That's the first thing I did, before cutting the elbow off the pvc inlet. Couldn't pull a lick. My bench test on pump confirms that it pills.

Are you thinking that the PVC is a well pipe? I was hoping it was, but it has an elbow 18" below grade. I've never seen a well with a joint in it's piping before.
 
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